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Forum topic by trevor7428 posted 04-01-2016 10:21 AM 831 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trevor7428

149 posts in 425 days


04-01-2016 10:21 AM

So when my grandfather passed away, I got some of his tools he had.

Just wondering what this item is worth. I found the exact same item in Lee Valleys Woodworking Catalog, but $200 seems crazy over priced. Do people actually buy these still to this day? Even when you can get the digital counterpart for $30

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion


11 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#1 posted 04-01-2016 10:28 AM

Well heck yeah, Pablo. Micrometers are nice to have and can be quite expensive. I prefer dial calipers but Mikes can measure down to past the thou more accurately. They also have a built in clutch so that you get the same pressure on the piece measured.

Yours looks like a 0 – 1” which means it measures anything from 0 to 1.000”.

And Starrett…thats currency.

I hate digital. Take a bit of time to learn to read this one and you will never go digital.

Starretts web site shows these going for just over 200.

Steve

EDIT: Never fully close them and leave them closed. Dad was a machinest and told me that. I dont know if it has to do with thermal expansion or what.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View trevor7428's profile

trevor7428

149 posts in 425 days


#2 posted 04-01-2016 10:37 AM



Well heck yeah, Pablo. Micrometers are nice to have and can be quite expensive. I prefer dial calipers but Mikes can measure down to past the thou more accurately. They also have a built in clutch so that you get the same pressure on the piece measured.

Yours looks like a 0 – 1” which means it measures anything from 0 to 1.000”.

And Starrett…thats currency.

I hate digital. Take a bit of time to learn to read this one and you will never go digital.

Starretts web site shows these going for just over 200.

Steve

EDIT: Never fully close them and leave them closed. Dad was a machinest and told me that. I dont know if it has to do with thermal expansion or what.

- SirIrb

Oh wow! I had no idea it was that sensitive. I don’t know if I would need to be that precise for my woodworking needs. But as of now, I couldn’t use it if I wanted too. Lol have no idea how to use/ read the damn thing. Will check out their website. Thanks

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#3 posted 04-01-2016 10:52 AM

you dont really need to use this for woodworking. But as far as machinery goes and any metal you are set.

study up.
http://www.linnbenton.edu/auto/day/mike/read.html

It will pay off.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#4 posted 04-01-2016 01:26 PM

Easily worth a hundred to the right person, maybe a touch more. Lee Valley is way overpriced in my opinion.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 686 days


#5 posted 04-01-2016 02:29 PM

I
EDIT: Never fully close them and leave them closed. Dad was a machinest and told me that. I dont know if it has to do with thermal expansion or what.

- SirIrb

My take on it was to allow airflow which would prevent moisture/rust from forming at the gap. The thermal expansion reasoning seems plausible as well.

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#6 posted 04-01-2016 02:32 PM

Sounds right. He would smack my hands (once I set it down) if I closed them fully.

Now I look at fellow engineers with a bit of that when they return my calipers fully closed.
“Hey, Paco, leave .010 between the jaws on my calipers next time!”

I
EDIT: Never fully close them and leave them closed. Dad was a machinest and told me that. I dont know if it has to do with thermal expansion or what.

- SirIrb

My take on it was to allow airflow which would prevent moisture/rust from forming at the gap. The thermal expansion reasoning seems plausible as well.

- splintergroup


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 686 days


#7 posted 04-01-2016 03:58 PM



Sounds right. He would smack my hands (once I set it down) if I closed them fully.

Now I look at fellow engineers with a bit of that when they return my calipers fully closed.
“Hey, Paco, leave .010 between the jaws on my calipers next time!”

- SirIrb

I still remember when I was little and thought my Dad’s micrometers were just fancy “C” clamps. Fortunately he stopped me before I committed them 8^0

View lndfilwiz's profile

lndfilwiz

90 posts in 1065 days


#8 posted 04-01-2016 04:06 PM

Trevor, It won’t hurt to throw one of those silicate packs into the box to help keep moisture to a minimum.

-- Smile, it makes people wander what you are up to.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

273 posts in 307 days


#9 posted 04-01-2016 04:36 PM

Learn to use the vernier scale and impress all others!! This is as accurate or more accurate than a dial version, and a lot more rugged. It fits in the pocket easier too. But you have to learn to read the vernier scale (easy enough). Others will be confused but it adds to your prestige. Sort of like using a slide rule to do calculations.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1762 posts in 603 days


#10 posted 04-01-2016 06:00 PM

Those mic’s are invaluable to machinists and Starrett’s definitely the one to have. Not much use for wood working but for precision, can’t be beat.

You’ll find digital mic’s in QA offices, never in a machinists or an engineers box. At least in my experience!


Now I look at fellow engineers with a bit of that when they return my calipers fully closed.
“Hey, Paco, leave .010 between the jaws on my calipers next time!”

- SirIrb

Funny… I always close all my mic’s and calipers completely. Why? To make sure there’s not a small chip or grease or something on the jaws/faces that might initiate corrosion. Not saying it’s right, just found it amusing :)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#11 posted 04-01-2016 07:25 PM

That is a very nice tool and I would love to have it. I lost all of my machinist tools in our plant fire. BTW, don’t loose the box. It makes it worth even more – especially if it’s the original box for that mike.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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