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Sliding table saw question (ShopNotes #138)

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Forum topic by trevor7428 posted 03-31-2016 08:55 AM 1129 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trevor7428

146 posts in 420 days


03-31-2016 08:55 AM

So I want to build this sliding table for my table saw from ShopNotes #138. Ill post pics of plans, if anyone is interested in building themselves (sorry for being in black and white lol)

My question before I start building is how far is the sliding table going to slide out the back of the saw. Unfortunately I already build an outfeed table. I dont want the outfeed table to interfere with the sliding table.

Anybody have any ideas how far away my table saw and outfeed table have to be away from each other, so this sliding table has full travel with no interference from outfeed

...if I do make this sliding table. I would remove the left wood storage wing I made.

?

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion


9 replies so far

View tamtum's profile

tamtum

181 posts in 1299 days


#1 posted 03-31-2016 09:22 AM

I’m planning to make one this time. I think the sliding must have the same distance before and after the saw. Think that you have to cut 50cm of wood so you need 50cm before and 50cm after the saw So you need 1m of sliding. I will make the mechanism with linear bearing. I haven’t too much space in my workshop so I will try to make a small (about 1 meter) and a vertical panel saw for the big panels.

-- Alexander , Greece, http://alekosbiki.wordpress.com/

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#2 posted 03-31-2016 04:27 PM

Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn’t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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trevor7428

146 posts in 420 days


#3 posted 04-01-2016 02:23 AM



Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen

Thanks for the reply, any sled I’ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you’re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don’t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

View trevor7428's profile

trevor7428

146 posts in 420 days


#4 posted 04-01-2016 02:29 AM



I m planning to make one this time. I think the sliding must have the same distance before and after the saw. Think that you have to cut 50cm of wood so you need 50cm before and 50cm after the saw So you need 1m of sliding. I will make the mechanism with linear bearing. I haven t too much space in my workshop so I will try to make a small (about 1 meter) and a vertical panel saw for the big panels.

- tamtum

Thinking about it, I think you might be right. This might not work for me then :/
Not unless I move my outgrew table pretty far away from my table saw. Or modify it somehow. I guess I could shift the whole outfeed table to the right too.

If anyone this moving or modifying my outfreed table is not necessary. I would love to know

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 348 days


#5 posted 04-02-2016 04:58 AM


Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen
I have a sled that will cross cut 30”..and to keep the sled from tipping when pulled all the forward I mortised some washers into the leading end of the runners that fit in the “T” shaped miter slots of my saw..even though I yearn for an Altendorf with an 8’ sliding table Lol

Thanks for the reply, any sled I ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

- trevor7428

Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen

Thanks for the reply, any sled I ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

- trevor7428


-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 348 days


#6 posted 04-02-2016 04:59 AM


Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen
I have a sled that will cross cut 30”..and to keep the sled from tipping when pulled all the forward I mortised some washers into the leading end of the runners that fit in the “T” shaped miter slots of my saw..even though I yearn for an Altendorf with an 8’ sliding table Lol

Thanks for the reply, any sled I ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

- trevor7428

Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen

Thanks for the reply, any sled I ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

- trevor7428


-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 348 days


#7 posted 04-02-2016 05:06 AM

Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen

Thanks for the reply, any sled I ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

- trevor7428

Is there any advantage other than cutting depth over a crosscut sled? If you make a sled instead, you could use the miter slots and wouldn t need to alter your current setup since you cut the miter slots into the outfeed table.

- HokieKen

Thanks for the reply, any sled I ve seen/ used your limited by the distance between fence in front and fence in back of sled. Even if there is no back fence. Ur cross cut width is limited by how long the miter slides are.

So if you want to cross cut a piece 24 inches wide you only have such little amount of miter slides in the miter track its hard to keep the cross cut sled level as you re trying to push it Forward at the same time, but if you had the sliding table. You can Crosscut 30 inches wide, no problem because the sliding table is flat and level. Also, you don t have to worry about miter slides coming out of tracks or balancing it when cross cutting huge pieces as you would a cross cut sled.

- trevor7428


I have a sled that can cross cut 30”and to keep it from tipping when pulled forward of the blade I mortised washers into the leading end of the runners that fit in the miter guage”T”slots and it works great.Not saying I don’t still yearn for an Altendorf with an 8’ sliding table.LOL

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

View tamtum's profile

tamtum

181 posts in 1299 days


#8 posted 04-21-2016 03:03 PM

This time I construct the sliding table for the dewalt dw744. The total sliding length is 150cm and the clear cut of the sliding table is 120cm So I lost 30cm of the sliding (about the fence + saw)

-- Alexander , Greece, http://alekosbiki.wordpress.com/

View trevor7428's profile

trevor7428

146 posts in 420 days


#9 posted 05-11-2016 05:21 AM



This time I construct the sliding table for the dewalt dw744. The total sliding length is 150cm and the clear cut of the sliding table is 120cm So I lost 30cm of the sliding (about the fence + saw)

- tamtum

WOW!

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

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