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How would you cut these splines?

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Forum topic by ravensrock posted 03-30-2016 11:50 PM 956 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


03-30-2016 11:50 PM

So I had this piece of walnut with nice straight grain and I thought I’d make a simple box. Then I decided to try veneering for the first time so veneered the top. Then I saw these cool splines online (see the pic) and thought I’d like to try them. So this simple box is becoming more complex.

I built a jig to cut them on the table saw. I used maple and want to now add a second spline of wenge in each one to match the wenge lift I plan to add. The maple splines are 1/4” thick and came out fine. I’d like to add a 1/8” piece of wenge to each but the cut has to be centered perfectly. I don’t think the jig I built can be used for this since I can’t see the maple spline being cut. I could try to line it up perfectly but that seems difficult. I also have a 1/8” upcut spiral bit for my router. Maybe another jig of some kind for the router table?

Any thoughts?

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking


19 replies so far

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joey502

487 posts in 985 days


#1 posted 03-31-2016 04:19 AM

I would have laminated the spline stock beforehand. You could still do that, cut out the spline you have added and glue in the new ones.

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#2 posted 03-31-2016 05:57 AM

I’d leave them as is… they look perfect and you would kick yourself if you messed them up trying to do what you are considering. Leave the wenge for your next box and plan ahead :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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pete724

36 posts in 276 days


#3 posted 03-31-2016 07:56 AM



I would have laminated the spline stock beforehand. You could still do that, cut out the spline you have added and glue in the new ones.

- joey502

That’s a good start but not quite so simple.

He also would have needed to edgeband the splines or install the splines in 2 stages.

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pete724

36 posts in 276 days


#4 posted 03-31-2016 08:03 AM

Ravensrock,

You need resettable ( with stop blocks?) fences on your jig to get the box exactly in the previous position to be able to “spline the spline”.

Could be done but would be difficult after the fact.

Doesn’t matter whether done on router table or tablesaw or whatever.
Those spacer blocks or whatever sets the fences, need to be setup before doing any of the splining.

Maybe you can do it after the fact but its gonna be much harder.

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#5 posted 03-31-2016 12:33 PM

My original thought was to laminate them before. But as pete724 said that would have not worked for the vertical edge of the spline. Thanks for the suggestions.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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joey502

487 posts in 985 days


#6 posted 03-31-2016 12:40 PM


I would have laminated the spline stock beforehand. You could still do that, cut out the spline you have added and glue in the new ones.

- joey502

That s a good start but not quite so simple.

He also would have needed to edgeband the splines or install the splines in 2 stages.

- pete724


My original thought was to laminate them before. But as pete724 said that would have not worked for the vertical edge of the spline. Thanks for the suggestions.

- ravensrock

My apologies, i did not look at the pic closely enough the first time.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1812 posts in 606 days


#7 posted 03-31-2016 04:51 PM

There’s always a handsaw and chisel. You could knife your lines and saw a kerf and then pare the waste with a 1/8 chisel. So you’d be removing a triangular section. Quite a bit of work but might be the “safest” method. You could also use your jig and a thin kerf blade so even if you missed dead center, you could finish the waste with a file or sandpaper to center it up.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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KnickKnack

1062 posts in 3034 days


#8 posted 03-31-2016 05:06 PM

I’ve done this a couple of times – it’s a breeze on a router table…

1. You need a jig that will hold your piece at 45° – I made one of these a while back, and it’s a very useful big of jigware – my 45° router jig
2. Start with (say) a 5mm bit – cut 4 (or 8, if the distances from top and bottom are the same) spline slots. Do NOT move the fence. Apply splines, and sand/plane/scrape smooth
3. Change to a (say) 3mm bit – redo those same cuts, which will be exactly in the centre of the first cuts. Obviously you will need to set the height carefully, but you can “sneak up” on the right height, or not – maybe a slightly fatter vertical would look good?

You could, of course, if you wanted, have a whole set of woods in the spline – 8mm, 6mm, 5mm, 4mm, 3mm :-)

I see you also have a “central” spline, 2 ways for this…
1. Do the above to get yourself 8, then simply reposition the fence for the last 4 – I think this is best myself, but takes a little longer, or
2. Position the central one, and use a spacer block on the fence to do the others.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#9 posted 03-31-2016 05:19 PM

HokieKen- I thought about doing them by hand but don’t have a 1/8” chisel and thought getting the bottoms flat would be tough.

KnickKnack- Something like this is what I was leaning toward. The cuts in your pic are longer and with the grain. I’m thinking this jig would have to straddle the bit in a 90 degree cradle so the box is more straight up and down like the table saw jig.

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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KnickKnack

1062 posts in 3034 days


#10 posted 03-31-2016 05:38 PM


The cuts in your pic are longer and with the grain. I m thinking this jig would have to straddle the bit in a 90 degree cradle so the box is more straight up and down like the table saw jig.

- ravensrock

Yes indeed, but I used the same jig to make these splines.
I just run the flat surface of the jig against the fence (which was why I built it that way :-))

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#11 posted 03-31-2016 06:54 PM

Thanks KnickKnack. Still trying to picture this though. First of all my top and bottom splines aren’t the same distance from the edge so I guess I can only do 4 at a time. Would have been smart like you suggest to use a router table jig to start, keep the fence in the same location and just change bits. But I used a table saw jig so will have to set up 3 separate locations to cut.

Not sure what you mean by “just run the flat surface of the jig against the fence” to do splines on a box. It looks like that’s what you’re doing in the pictures and I don’t see how a rectangular box would be placed to cut the splines. It seems like the corner of the box needs to somehow be perpendicular to the bit. It’s likely obvious and I’m just a little slow today!

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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KnickKnack

1062 posts in 3034 days


#12 posted 03-31-2016 07:10 PM


Not sure what you mean by “just run the flat surface of the jig against the fence” to do splines on a box. It looks like that s what you re doing in the pictures and I don t see how a rectangular box would be placed to cut the splines. It seems like the corner of the box needs to somehow be perpendicular to the bit. It s likely obvious and I m just a little slow today!
- ravensrock

Well, by the miracles of modern technology, and never having ever deleted anything in my life, here are some “how I did it” making that box…

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#13 posted 03-31-2016 09:46 PM

Ahhhh….now I see what you mean by the flat surface. So you push the whole jig along the fence and into the bit instead of sliding the workpiece along the jig as you did on the other project. With some carefully placed stop blocks I think that could work. And I’ll even be able to see where it will cut which is what I was hoping to be able to do. Thanks a bunch!

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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KnickKnack

1062 posts in 3034 days


#14 posted 03-31-2016 10:03 PM

...So you push the whole jig along the fence and into the bit instead of sliding the workpiece along the jig as you did on the other project.
- ravensrock

Yes, and no.
In the first case the wood is clamped to the jig and the whole jig slides too, just like in this case.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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ravensrock

337 posts in 1110 days


#15 posted 03-31-2016 10:31 PM

Okay. I see it now. So it’s MDF- (2) 45 degree angles, (2) pieces to support the project screwed to the 45’s, and an end support? What’s the notch in the end for? I could add a stop block for repeatability. But I guess you don’t have to now that I look at it again. Looks like you just adjust the position of the fence?

-- Dave, York, PA, WildSide Woodworking

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