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Forum topic by cdaniels posted 03-29-2016 04:24 AM 738 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


03-29-2016 04:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: turning milling blanks bowls woodturning lathe

Some people like to turn bowls to final thickness from green wood so it warps. my questions is in that process. When you turn to final thickness do you sand right then or do you just put it away and wait for it to dry then sand it up? if you do then there’s no way you can put it back on the lathe and sand it so would you just sand it by hand at that point once dry? if you sand it right after turning it wet doesn’t that clog up your paper really bad?

Second part is in the processing of logs into blanks, I know the process and everything but I came across this article and noticed in the first photo you get 4 bowls instead of the usual 2. why don’t people use this method regularly?

http://www.customwooddesign.com/turninggreenwood-1.html

Chris

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying


14 replies so far

View Druid's profile

Druid

1299 posts in 2256 days


#1 posted 03-29-2016 04:38 AM

Hi Chris, I have not tried this method, even though I am also interested in hearing how this is best achieved.
Just in case you have heard of turners using a microwave oven to speed up the drying, I would suggest that a lot of caution be used if you decide to try this. Here is an example of what can happen . . .
http://lumberjocks.com/Druid/blog/79450

Hope that all is going well with you.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1191 days


#2 posted 03-29-2016 05:25 AM

Hey Chris, you must sand it thoroughly while it’s still an option. It will look a little like wrinkled leather after it’s done drying and shrinking. It won’t be possible to sand it without destroying the leather look.

Sanding wet will clog paper, but I use cloth backed sanding media. When it’s clogged, I blow it off with a blast of air, and continue. When done, I put the media where the sun will get to it, and in 2 days time, the stuff just blows off, and I reuse the sanding media again. It’s tossed after that.

Palo Verde and Eucalyptus will do wonderful things when drying if turned wet. Crotch wood does wonders also in shrinking and warping

If you use Mesquite, it can be done from start to finish in one day, and will not warp more than 1/16” on a 15” bowl. ............... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 762 days


#3 posted 03-29-2016 11:57 AM

The turning green (complete) I have done I have always sanded on the lathe to 220 which is fine enough.
Normally you turn to very thin to hopefully stop cracking as it dries. I use a 3M product for automotive which looks like drywall sanding sheets but much more refined. Be careful of using water on the lathe and make sure your electrics are protected. Michael O’Donnell has a good book/video on turning green.
Make sure you leave the foot deep enough to sand it flat when dry, the object will probably warp but it should still sit without a wobble.

As far a cutting the log there is no set rules. Many cut the log in half because this yields the largest bowl and it is most often a good place to start.
In books by Richard Raffan and Michael O’Donnel they show different cut and how it affects the grain pattern in the finished item.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Bruyet's profile

Bruyet

34 posts in 604 days


#4 posted 03-29-2016 12:08 PM

This is my favorite part of woodturning. It is predictably unpredictable what the wood will do as it dries out. This is a cottonwood burl that I had thrown out twice, thinking it wouldn’t survive. Keep in mind that the bowl bottom will warp, too. I usually us a jam chuck and true the bottom after the piece is dry.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#5 posted 03-29-2016 01:04 PM

At some point will learn about grain orientation as important as form.

http://www.ghwg.ca/techniques/Todd%20Hoyer%20-%20Grain%20Orientation.pdf

Turning wet bowls and finishing in one day involves some luck and turning uniform thickness of ¼” or less. I am lucky to get ¼” usually more like 5/16” to 3/8” my bowl bottoms usually thicker! Jerry lives in a dry climate, I live on the east coast with lots of humidity our approach to wood lot different.

I have destroyed as many as successfully turned thin bowls. Though lot better at it now because of skill set learned along the way don’t turn thin bowls any more. Find it easier to rough turn and set aside to dry.

Good luck with it.

-- Bill

View cdaniels's profile

cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


#6 posted 03-29-2016 02:10 PM

Bill thanks for that link that is something i’ve been looking for, still learning the grain orientation and it’s nice to have a reference to go back to.

we normally have winter for 6-7 months up here and the humidity sits around 50%, I have turned a few natural edge bowls now but not sure how they will turn out once dry. maple and poplar are the most common woods up here and they both have pretty boring grain but makes for good practice.

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

207 posts in 923 days


#7 posted 03-29-2016 03:30 PM

I think green wood turning is the best, most fun for me. What I know I learned from Jimmy Clewes.
I have done several natural edge vases with green wood. And a couple of bowls.
What I have learned is once you start turning you must finish. No stopping and picking it up tomorrow. The green wood will move to much. Also turn it thin, and more importantly turn it to a uniform thickness. This will let it dry evenly. Keep a spray bottle of water handy and keep the wood wet. Once you are ready to sand, get a bowl of water and wet sand it. Keep cleaning the sand paper in the bowl of water as it clogs up. As soon as you are done sanding, and it dries for a moment. Oil it.
I really like how the wood moves as it dries. I tend to shoot for about an 1/8” thickness. Sometimes it works, and sometimes, ...... It gets a little ugly. Always turn safe.
Good luck.

-- John

View cdaniels's profile

cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


#8 posted 03-29-2016 03:33 PM

john those are awesome! I want to tru turnings like those but I figure bowls are a safer bet for me to learn first.

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying

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bigJohninvegas

207 posts in 923 days


#9 posted 03-29-2016 04:08 PM

Bruyet, I love it when the piece gets that potato chip warp to it.
Cdaniels, thanks. Funny the bowls are what I have the most trouble with. I keep getting to thin in the bottom.

-- John

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#10 posted 03-31-2016 02:44 AM

+1 to what Jerry said, sand while it’s on the lathe. It will get a texture but still be fairly smooth.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View cdaniels's profile

cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


#11 posted 04-09-2016 08:10 PM

so I got this end cut from a logging site, a piece of silky oak and cut it into bowl blanks and sealed them all up with anchorseal. I kept 1-8” blank out and turned a bowl with it last night to about 1/4” thickness and wrapped the rim in plastic wrap at around 0300. When I got up at 0700 I went to check on the bowl and it was covered in mold. not just under the plastic but all over the whole bowl. It has never happened with anything else i’ve turned so i’m wondering what’s going on?

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

207 posts in 923 days


#12 posted 04-09-2016 10:38 PM

Ya, it does that, and its ok. I would leave it alone till your ready to work on it again. Then mix up a little bleach and water in a spray bottle. Will kill the mold almost on contact.
I would wear a resperator or at least a dust mask while you finish turning it too.
When you are done sanding I let it spin dry on the lathe till it starts to look dry, then I oil it with your favorite oil finish. Danish oil for me.

-- John

View cdaniels's profile

cdaniels

1311 posts in 962 days


#13 posted 04-10-2016 06:09 PM

will the bleach mess with the color of the oak?

-- Jesus was a carpenter... I'm just saying

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

207 posts in 923 days


#14 posted 04-10-2016 11:02 PM

I’ve never had any problems with the bleach. I have used it on misquite, and apple wood before.
You are using a very small amount. Like a couple table spoons to a couple cups of water in a spray bottle, or even a bowl if you don’t have a small bottle. Mix up a small bowl and wipe it down with a rag. Will take all that fuzz right off.
Wipe it down with plain wet rag so you don’t sling bleach water all over the shop. I also put a towel across the lathe bed to keep rust under control.

-- John

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