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Delta 6 inch jointer 37-205 motor smokes

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Forum topic by turnerbjt posted 03-29-2016 02:20 AM 693 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


03-29-2016 02:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer

I brought home my grandfather’s 1950 6 inch Delta jointer that has been sitting in storage at my dad’s. I cleaned it up to a usable condition and plugged it in to a 110 outlet with an extension cord.

It would run for a a couple minutes and then kick the breaker in my garage (20 amp circuit). So I thought it was because I was running it with an extension cord and the only outlet that I could put it by easily in my garage is a 220 outlet that I wired in for my table saw. So on the motor it shows a schematic for changing to 220 and I changed the wires in the switch box and changed the plug from the little 110 plug to a 220 plug that would fit my 220 receptacle. There is no ground wire to this motor which scares me so I haven’t touched the thing except with a plastic wood pusher so far.

So I plugged it in to my 220 outlet, and turned it on. It ran very smooth and I turned it off after about 30 seconds or so. I saw a very small amount of smoke from both side of the motor for a few seconds, I was unsure if this was a motor problem or a dust/grime on the motor problem. So let it sit and tried it again and ran it for a few minutes this time, I ran a board of the jointer and then turned it off. And again there was a small amount of smoke from the motor sides again.

My question is what are the main possibilities for the smoke. If I wired it wrong would it even run?
And what is the best way to add a ground to this type of motor?

And has anyone ever seen this type of base under a delta jointer before?


20 replies so far

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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


#1 posted 03-29-2016 02:27 AM

Where exactly is the smoke coming from? Could it be bad bearings where the shaft comes out the end? If they get hot, the leftover grease can smoke.

If its electrical smoke, make sure you check your connections. Does the motor get too hot? If you have it on and running, can you get a voltage from the motor case to ground? That could indicate a short somewhere in there too.

Just trying to spitball some things to check.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


#2 posted 03-29-2016 03:50 AM

The smoke was coming from mainly the accessory shaft area. The whole motor felt pretty warm.

I took the motor off and dismantled it. It had a lot of old sawdust built up inside of it. It was like a dust storm when I blew it out. The bearings don’t turn real easily and have a grinding feel to them but no play, so I need to replace those. I could not find any burned marks around any wiring, but I did see a small black area on the back side of a board with soldered wires on it. I may have damaged a contact point when I removed the shaft and pulled it away from the board.

The motor info is this
Model: FC82A910
3/4 hp, 1725 rpm, type SCS, frame 173

Is there anywhere to find a number for ordering bearings?

I’m pretty sure the bearings were getting hot and all the dust was smoking. I could be wrong though.

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MrUnix

4209 posts in 1660 days


#3 posted 03-29-2016 04:13 AM

Pull the bearings and look at the numbers stamped on the side… and measure them (O.D., bore, and both inner and outer race width) with some callipers just to verify. Then give Lynne a call at Accurate bearings and she will hook you up.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


#4 posted 03-30-2016 07:21 PM

I’ve decided to not resurrect this motor and replace it. I need a motor to run the 6 inch jointer only. It looks like the original jointer 6 inch delta jointers came with a 1/2 hp motor and the one I took off was a 3/4 hp because my stand had an accessory arbor on it, which i will not use. Should I get a 1/2 hp or go bigger for better performance or is 1/2 sufficient.
And any recommendation on motor brand, i want to go with a totally enclosed fan cooled motor dual voltage.

Thanks,
Brett

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MrUnix

4209 posts in 1660 days


#5 posted 03-30-2016 07:37 PM

I would be more inclined to spend the $10 to fix that motor if it’s an original Delta (looks like it is). Otherwise, just about any TEFC motor with the same mount, direction, speed and shaft diameter would work. Then sell that one over at the OWWM site – you will find plenty of takers, as those are sought after and coveted motors by many, and they clean up really nice.

That jointer looks like it might have originally been part of a 37-595 “Combo” machine… but the table saw has been removed and replaced with – ummm, who knows what that was used for. And they did offer a 3/4hp motor for it (motors had to be purchased separately).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#6 posted 03-30-2016 08:48 PM

1950…before I was born but I do recall some machines having an “oil cap” that required a few drops of light weight oil periodically (before the newer “sealed for life” bearings). Your motor starts with FC (fan cooled)...newer motors will add the E (enclosed)...note to Brad…I like that pix you posted…fore-runner to the Shop-smith maybe?

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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


#7 posted 03-30-2016 09:19 PM

I’m intrigued, I will replace the bearings and put it back together, and see what happens. This morning I was envisioning that after I replace the bearings that the centrifugal switch would go bad and then the contact plate and then the capacitor. I just felt like I was in over my head, so I got a little discouraged. This is the first time I have ever worked on a motor, so I’m learning as I go. I just picked up this woodworking hobby but I feel like I’ve learned more about machines than wood so far, which is okay too, it is all fun to me. I work all day in an office and an operating room, so this stuff has been relaxing for me. I acquired a Grizzly 10 inch table saw G1023 2 weeks ago and replaced the arbor shaft bearings and pully on that and cleaned it up real nice. I got it for 375 dollars, so I think i got a fair deal on that. I like having some of these older tools, they seem so robust and solid.

Ya this motor since it had opening on the under surface of both end caps was really dirty inside, that’s why I thought a TEFC motor may be better, BUT i do think keeping the original motor would be the best and most true to the machine, I’ll still work on this and not give up yet.

Thanks,
Brett

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MrUnix

4209 posts in 1660 days


#8 posted 03-30-2016 09:55 PM

Induction motors are pretty durable, and there isn’t much that can go wrong with them if properly maintained. Clean it out really good, clean the centrifugal switch contacts and replace the bearings. Should be good for another 50 years after that. Don’t worry about the start cap… those are on the outside, easy to get to, easy to replace, and are pretty cheap as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#9 posted 03-30-2016 10:44 PM



I m intrigued, I will replace the bearings and put it back together, and see what happens. This morning I was envisioning that after I replace the bearings that the centrifugal switch would go bad and then the contact plate and then the capacitor. I just felt like I was in over my head, so I got a little discouraged. This is the first time I have ever worked on a motor, so I m learning as I go. I just picked up this woodworking hobby but I feel like I ve learned more about machines than wood so far, which is okay too, it is all fun to me. I work all day in an office and an operating room, so this stuff has been relaxing for me. I acquired a Grizzly 10 inch table saw G1023 2 weeks ago and replaced the arbor shaft bearings and pully on that and cleaned it up real nice. I got it for 375 dollars, so I think i got a fair deal on that. I like having some of these older tools, they seem so robust and solid.

Ya this motor since it had opening on the under surface of both end caps was really dirty inside, that s why I thought a TEFC motor may be better, BUT i do think keeping the original motor would be the best and most true to the machine, I ll still work on this and not give up yet.

Thanks,
Brett

- turnerbjt

You worrying about switches and such on the vintage machine says you are thinking too much! They were solid but not complicated in the old days. So one step at a time I think. Now just from experience, be careful around those knives (some of the nastiest cuts I have ever experienced were from trying to clean off factory surfaces from a jointer that was not even running). Your tables still need a lot of work…guess I’d start with a rust remover and a pile of paper towels, then follow up with a ROS sander with a 500 grit disk (onlineindustrialsupply.com is my preferred choice for most sanding needs), then wax it. Motor…if you have an air compressor put on an air nozzle and go to work and get it cleaned out. Looks like a neat machine and I hope you get it work!

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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


#10 posted 03-30-2016 11:13 PM

Thanks for the picture Brad of the 37-595 combo. This machine was from my grandfather and my dad had it in a back room of a shop for the last 20 years unused. My father did not know much more than that about it. The area where the table saw would be is a single arbor shaft that has what looks like a broken off abrasive disc in it. The is a 1/2 thick plate of steel on the table that I could barely lift off of it when I was taking it apart. At first I thought they used that thick of steel as a counter weight, but it was plenty stable with out it, I guess someone had an extra piece 1/2 thick steel plate to use. It’s also interesting that this was a jointer TS combo because to save space in my garage I had placed it next to my TS with the jointer stand tucked under my TS right side table extension to save space. I ordered the bearings today. Hopefully i can get this back together and running right again.

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McFly

188 posts in 489 days


#11 posted 03-31-2016 04:03 AM

Cool tool made even cooler with some family history.

About that poor steel…if it were mine, I would see if I could find someone local to re-mill it back to glory. If not, after a session with dome rust remover, I would check to see how deep the pitting is and how widely prevalent it has gotten. If it was really gnarly, I might TIG weld a few dots into the deepest craters and grind them back down with abrasive pads.

Once I had a reasonably smooth surface all the way across, I’d step up through the grit range – just like sanding lumber – until I got somewhere between 1,000-1500 and then swap over to a polishing wheel to finish it off with a little green Jackson polishing compound and a coat of wax. Then it would be good for another hundred years or so!

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MrUnix

4209 posts in 1660 days


#12 posted 03-31-2016 04:21 AM

There is nothing wrong with that table and it will clean up nice. Pitting is not a problem worth worrying about in the least. Razor blade most of the built up rust/gunk off, then hit it with some WD40 and/or other solvents and a scotch brite pad under a vibrating sander. I’ve had tables far worse than that, and have never needed to do anything else. It doesn’t need to be perfectly smooth, just flat. This jointer was far worse off, and it cleaned up nice with nothing more than what I mentioned above:


(before)


(after)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


#13 posted 03-31-2016 04:21 AM

I’m gonna try the rust remover and sanding first. I ordered the bearings! I’m gonna get a new electrical cord with a ground wire and attach the ground somewhere on the motor. I see this coming together now in my mind, thanks guys for helping me see the light.

Brett

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turnerbjt

9 posts in 251 days


#14 posted 03-31-2016 04:35 AM

Here are some better pics of the table. I’m excited to get to work on it.

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MrUnix

4209 posts in 1660 days


#15 posted 03-31-2016 04:48 AM

Those tables (and fence) are in fantastic shape – they will clean up nice without much effort.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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