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Forum topic by rockom posted 03-10-2010 04:18 AM 920 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rockom

134 posts in 3332 days


03-10-2010 04:18 AM

Hi,

I’m wondering what band saw blade to use for a cut.

I’ve got the following blades:

1.) 1/8” wide, 14TPI, 0.025” gauge, raker
2.) 1/4” wide, 14TPI, 0.025” gauge, raker
3.) 1/2” wide, 7TPI, 0.025” gauge, raker
4.) 3/4” wide, 3TPI, 0.032” gauge, hook

My stock is about 1-7/8” x 6” x 15”.
I’m wondering what blade would be best to follow the curved line. This is on a Jet 14” BS.
Here is the pattern.

Leg Pattern

Photo Link

Thanks,
-Rocko

-- -> Malta, IL -<


7 replies so far

View dannymac's profile

dannymac

144 posts in 2477 days


#1 posted 03-10-2010 04:43 AM

it’s a fairly gentel curve, i’d go with the 1/2”

-- dannymac

View shopdog's profile

shopdog

576 posts in 2947 days


#2 posted 03-10-2010 01:41 PM

I might use the 1/4” for a cleaner cut, but the 1/2” will certainly work well. What kind of wood are you cutting?

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


#3 posted 03-10-2010 03:42 PM

I would use a 1/2” primarily because with wood this thick, you are better served with the 7 tpi.

There is a rule of thumb I once heard that you should never have more than 6 teeth in the wood at any one time. That rule would imply that you should use the 3/4” and the 3/4” could probably handle these curves, but I use my 3/4” strictly for straight line cutting (resawing). I’ve also heard that once you use your 3/4 for curves it compromises its ability to do straight lines well.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View rockom's profile

rockom

134 posts in 3332 days


#4 posted 03-10-2010 03:49 PM

I’m using Cherry. I could not find affordable cherry this thick so I’m using two panels face glued.

I had also read in a magazine somewhere that you can use a honing stone or something similar on the back edges of the blade to round over the edge. This allows the blade to roll smoother along the back end of the curve behind the cut leaving a smoother finish. I don’t think the curves in my pattern will run into that issue though.

Thanks all for your replies. I’ll try the 1/2” and move to the 1/4” if necessary.

-Rocko

-- -> Malta, IL -<

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


#5 posted 03-10-2010 03:58 PM

You probably know this but in case you do not – - Cherry is very vulnerable to burn marks. They are almost unavoidable. Plan on spending some time with the sander to remove these burn marks.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View rockom's profile

rockom

134 posts in 3332 days


#6 posted 03-10-2010 04:09 PM

I did not know about the burn marks. This is my first with cherry. Thank you for the heads up. The plans called for Mahogany but I live about 20min from a sawmill and they have great prices on local kiln dried cherry. I think I paid $4.30/bft for 5/4. I’ll be cutting just outside the line and then cleaning up on a drum sander where necessary. I’ll be doing some shaping with a spoke shave as well so any marks will be long gone by the time I finish.

Thanks again,
-Rocko

-- -> Malta, IL -<

View ackychris's profile

ackychris

103 posts in 2474 days


#7 posted 03-11-2010 10:40 AM

I didn’t know about the burn marks either—good to know!

-- I hate finishing. I never manage to quit while I'm ahead. --Chris

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