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Gluing oily, exotic veneers

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Forum topic by CNCSteve posted 03-10-2010 02:50 AM 3008 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CNCSteve

16 posts in 2471 days


03-10-2010 02:50 AM

Topic tags/keywords: veneering teak cocobolo

Has anyone ever had success bonding teak, cocobolo, or any other troublesome exotic veneers to a substrate? I know they say to wipe joining edges with acetone or denatured alcohol before you glue oily woods together, but can you get away with cleaning a veneer with solvent and press it down with unibond 800?

-- Steve, Wisconsin A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; but a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist.


5 replies so far

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#1 posted 03-10-2010 04:25 AM

I’ve used rosewood and teak veneer, and didn’t notice any oiliness at all. I believe they boils the logs when they slice the veneer, and I think that removes a lot of the oiliness. I’ve just used titebond cold press glue with no problems.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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CNCSteve

16 posts in 2471 days


#2 posted 03-11-2010 02:10 AM

When I worked at Burger Boat they went threw teak like it was red oak. Burger liked to do everything backwards though, so I know how one place does it but a few more opinions never hurt. If it was paperbacked veneer it was pressed with unibond otherwise the next closest thing was 1/8inch thick teak wiped with denatured alcohol and pressed with west system. But I never saw raw teak pressed with unibond, so I just wanted to put a feeler out just to see if anyone has had success with other methods. My forman, at Burger, said a person might be able to get away with unibond on raw teak veneer. But why go with one man’s assumption with an expensive material and have it fail in front of a client or go ahead and spend massive amounts of money and time using a west system epoxy when you can use unibond? I hope I did come off like a jerk but Im just looking for people to share the learning curve without the pocketbook being drained.

P.S thanks Ger21 for the input.

-- Steve, Wisconsin A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; but a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist.

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#3 posted 03-11-2010 02:27 AM

You can get good quality epoxy for 1/3 the price of West Systems. I’ve been using this for about a year now with great results. 3 quarts for about $40.
http://www.shopmaninc.com/epoxy.html

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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Breadboard

7 posts in 2470 days


#4 posted 12-05-2010 04:53 PM

Teak appears to have more of a wax-like characteristic to the wood, in my opinion, rather than what is described as olily. I scuff sanded by hand the glue side of .032 thick teak veneer with 60 grit sandpaper before vacuum pressing to MDF core using tite bond II. Three years later it’s still stuck on good.
You pose good questions. There is a risk. What do the manufactures of Architecturally matched veneered teak panels use for adhesive? Run some test pieces using Unibond 800, tite bond and perhaps some other adhesive then after curing for a week try peeling the veneer off the core to find which holds best.

I saw your cinnamon cherry furniture projects with veneered panels, awesome! You should post them here.

CNC Steve, I’m working on ideas (in me head) to make ‘end grain’ veneer for smaller projects. I hope to be able to run some test pieces soon. I’ll keep you informed.
Breadboard

-- "Beauty is in the Details"

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3199 days


#5 posted 12-05-2010 06:07 PM

I wipe oily woods with acetone just before gluing. Never have had any problems. It is important to try to remove some of the oils prior to gluing.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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