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What saw blade?

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Forum topic by bigarm posted 03-25-2016 08:43 PM 678 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bigarm

62 posts in 568 days


03-25-2016 08:43 PM

I am going to purchase my new saw today, either the Grizzly 1023 or 0690. I bought a 24 tooth Tenryu ripping blade. What regular blade should I purchase?


24 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2276 days


#1 posted 03-25-2016 09:03 PM

Depends on who you ask. I personally have too much going on to be changing blades out so i look for a good combination blade (36-40 tooth). designated rip blades do just that very well but are often used to make up for lack of power . The best bang for the buck i have experienced is the marples combination.

Has bountiful carbide lending itself to multiple sharpenings.

performs very well in ply crosscuts as well.

The best part it can be had for 39 is dollars.

If you just want to stimulate the economy there is always forrest, and many users will claim allegiance to that one.
(I have used forrest and still have a coup;e but am not particularly impressed)

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#2 posted 03-25-2016 09:04 PM

I’m a cheapskate and use a 40t general purpose carbide blade for everything (liking the Irwins lately but they cut thinner so a little adjustment to the cursor is required). But that’s just me…my Delta saw cuts pretty true and I have never had a problem (I don’t even bother with jointing the edges before a glue-up anymore). I don’t feel bad when I have to replace a $30 blade after 2 or more years of use. I figure the fewer teeth the longer they last (somewhat self-cleaning).

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teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#3 posted 03-25-2016 09:12 PM



Depends on who you ask. I personally have too much going on to be changing blades out so i look for a good combination blade (36-40 tooth). designated rip blades do just that very well but are often used to make up for lack of power . The best bang for the buck i have experienced is the marples combination.

Has bountiful carbide lending itself to multiple sharpenings.

performs very well in ply crosscuts as well.

The best part it can be had for 39 is dollars.

If you just want to stimulate the economy there is always forrest, and many users will claim allegiance to that one.
(I have used forrest and still have a coup;e but am not particularly impressed)

- cabmaker

Never bothered to sharpen a blade around here…best price I could find was 80 cents/tooth. Cheaper to replace it! Do you do your own? Seems it would be easy if a guy was set-up properly (I do my own chain-saw blades) but I’ve never attempted it.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 03-25-2016 09:25 PM

Freud LU86 thin kerf is a good 40 tooth general purpose blade. Rips and crosscuts well.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#5 posted 03-25-2016 11:08 PM

Either of those saws should put you firmly into full kerf blade territory unless you’re working with really expensive wood. What to get depends a lot on your needs, but since you’ve got a decent 24T rip blade, it’d make sense to cover the opposite end of the spectrum with a good crosscut blade that will also shine in fine plywood cuts….60T to 80T. Infinity Ultrasmooth 010-080, Forrest Duraline, Freud LU80, CMT 210.080.10 are all great full kerf 80T Hi-ATB blades that’ll give the lowest possible tearout. These two blades will cover your heavy ripping and finer work in spades.

As an everyday general purpose blade, it’s hard to beat the value of the full kerf Delta 35-7657 40T ATB blade….made in the USA, large C4 micrograin carbide, high quality steel plate, laser cut antivibration slots. It’ll rival many of the $100 general purpose blades. At that price you can just add it to the collection, and still afford the benefits of top notch task specific blades.

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1866 days


#6 posted 03-26-2016 12:22 AM

The only blade you will ever need is the Forrest Woodworker II, This one does it all very well.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View bigarm's profile

bigarm

62 posts in 568 days


#7 posted 03-26-2016 05:49 PM

I ended up splurging and ordering the Forrest Woodworker II 60 tooth blade. Might as well be completely broke.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#8 posted 03-26-2016 07:19 PM

Is it a Woodworker I 60T?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1866 days


#9 posted 03-26-2016 09:06 PM

Good move bigarm. I don’t think you will be disappointed. I believe you may be mistaken on the tooth count, however. The 10” Woodworker II is only offered with 40 or 48 teeth. I have the 48 tooth blade on a Delta tablesaw and absolutely love the combination. By the way, my 40 tooth Woodworker II only needs sharpening about every three years.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#10 posted 03-26-2016 09:19 PM

60t may be a hair much for ripping.

Ww2 40t here. It’s still cutting clean after a year plus

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2389 days


#11 posted 03-26-2016 09:56 PM

I think it all depends on what you intend to do with your table saw. I NEVER cross cut on my table saw. I have a miter saw for that. I use a rip type blade 24 teeth. The cut surface using this blade is as smooth as a jointer will get it.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#12 posted 03-26-2016 10:11 PM

“I NEVER cross cut on my table saw.”

Wise ^^

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#13 posted 03-26-2016 10:25 PM


“I NEVER cross cut on my table saw.”

Wise ^^

- waho6o9

I don’t even have a miter saw in my shop. It’s all done on the table saw.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#14 posted 03-26-2016 10:37 PM



“I NEVER cross cut on my table saw.”

Wise ^^

- waho6o9


I think it all depends on what you intend to do with your table saw. I NEVER cross cut on my table saw. I have a miter saw for that. I use a rip type blade 24 teeth. The cut surface using this blade is as smooth as a jointer will get it.

- Jim Finn

A good table saw has a more robust arbor structure than a miter saw, and better potential for accuracy. It’d take a fairly modest table saw before the opposite is true.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

464 posts in 369 days


#15 posted 03-26-2016 10:47 PM

I have read a lot that guys on this forum that don’t own miter saws, i was shocked. coming from a carpentry background i could never imagine not owning a miter saw. for working with large amount of dimensional lumber the miter saw is king. I have been using my 45 and crosscut sled more for more accurate cuts and it is king for precision.

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