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$2000 to spend on tools?

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Forum topic by GoatBoy posted 03-25-2016 04:22 PM 1343 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GoatBoy

5 posts in 259 days


03-25-2016 04:22 PM

Starting from scratch, how would you outfit your shop if you only had 2k to work with (not including wood)? What do you splurge on, what do you skimp on?

I’m just starting out with a plan to build simple quality furniture as well as some outdoor infrastructure around the farm such as pollished/pretty gates. I would rather put a little more time in than money and learn some hand tools, keeping the machines to a minimum. Im very interested in japanese hand tools and im thinking of investing a big chunk of the 2kids into them.

I already have the following for machines and don’t think I will invest much more for the time being

Table saw
Band saw
Drill press
Skill saw
Chop saw
Few others

But besides a hammer a square and level I’m pretty spars in the hand tools department.

So if you had 2k to put into hand tools, how do you spend it? What tools? What makes? Used? New?


43 replies so far

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 919 days


#1 posted 03-25-2016 04:30 PM

Start with a good saw & better fence. From there buy as you need. Buy cheap first, if it lasts, great, if no, buy next better model. Repeat as required. Took me a year and a half to build an 80 sq ft cabinet shop. Spent closer to $4000 than $2000 but spread out it wasn’t bad.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

250 posts in 638 days


#2 posted 03-25-2016 04:38 PM


Start with a good saw & better fence. From there buy as you need. Buy cheap first, if it lasts, great, if no, buy next better model. Repeat as required. Took me a year and a half to build an 80 sq ft cabinet shop. Spent closer to $4000 than $2000 but spread out it wasn t bad.

M

- MadMark

MadMark,

When you say an “80 sq. ft. cabinet shop” are you doing commercial work? I have seen this picture on here several times, and I honestly just don’t understand how you are able to work in that environment? To me, it just looks like chaos. To me a “cabinet shop” builds custom kitchen and bathroom cabinets, how is it even possible to outfit an entire kitchen in a 10’x8’ shop?

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#3 posted 03-25-2016 04:43 PM

I’ve never seen a cabinet shop with an incra fence.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 919 days


#4 posted 03-25-2016 04:54 PM

I build cabinets and raised panels. I have to store carcase’s elsewhere. To do a full kitchen all at once I’d need material storage. These cabs are for the landlord and had to be built over time due to cost considerations, but given the materials the shop is more than sufficient.

It looks like chaos but I’m on the disabled list so everything is where I can reach it without walking. The OSS and planer are on wheels. The base of the parts bins hold small power tools.

The shop runs every day making small items and large.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#5 posted 03-25-2016 04:59 PM

Interesting dilemma

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/153242

The Samurai workbench may give you an idea on where to start on your
journey.

Good luck and have fun.

View Babieca's profile

Babieca

120 posts in 970 days


#6 posted 03-25-2016 05:13 PM

It’s not Japanese style, but you may want to check out The Naked Woodworker by Mike Siemens http://lostartpress.com/products/the-naked-woodworker

It’s all about getting your feet wet in hand tool woodworking without breaking the bank. Includes selecting and tuning good used tools and building a hand tool workbench.

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

250 posts in 638 days


#7 posted 03-25-2016 05:34 PM

FWIW, I keep an excel spreadsheet of my shop spendings, and I am in just shy of 6k for a single-car garage shop. This is taking almost everything into account, from the floor tiles to the lighting, and everything in between. At least half of which is machinery cost… That said, size of shop shouldn’t matter a ton. If I were in a space 3x as large, my costs wouldn’t be significantly higher, lighting and floor tiles would be a bit more, I would probably have a few more machines (drum sander being a certain, and maybe a small CNC).

*Edit – Well, just realized this is in the HAND TOOL sub-forum. DOH! This post probably doesn’t apply.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23189 posts in 2333 days


#8 posted 03-25-2016 05:48 PM

I would buy a reasonably good set of hand tools. You can make just about anything that you want to with hand tools and they won’t break your bank account. You will also need some clamps and a workbench. Until you can do better you can build a reasonably good heavy duty bench with construction grade lumber and plywood for the top You can laminate two to three pcs of plywood together for a heavy top and cover the edges with hardwood. You’ll need a woodworking vise too. For your second project you can build a wall cabinet for your shop and tools.

The next step would be to buy a set of basic portable power tools. You can do it one at a time if you need to. Again, you won’t break your bank account this way. You can easily make anything that you want to with your hand tools and your portable power tools. If you wanted to make tables you could look for a small lathe new or used. Other wise you can just use square legs.

The last step would be to buy your stationary power tools one at a time. Once again, you won’t break the bank account this way.

When your just starting out you can really get into the hand tools and enjoy it. Having some had tool skills will always pay off no matter what you end up doing.

You’ll end up with a complete shop eventually and won’t break your bank account.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2548 days


#9 posted 03-25-2016 05:49 PM

A good 10” table saw. I have a Craftsman that is now almost 20 years old with the Better Sears fence. 12” SCRS with laser, 5” ROS, 1/2” and 3/8” VS Drill, 2HP plunge fixed base combo router, router table and a work bench or 2.

I use my rounout table as a work area. It can be a pain when I have to rip something on the table saw mid build, but i get by.

-- Chris K

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

844 posts in 2442 days


#10 posted 03-25-2016 05:56 PM

As I was getting into WW in mid/late 80’s, I bought a few small benchtop tools from Sears. They were only a few miles away and I’d never seen or visited a “real” WW store at the time. Plus, we had no internet to google on. I bought a small 8” drill press which I still use because it functions/run fine but wish it were larger. I also bought a small benchtop jointer which works great for making my workbench heavier and stay in place :)

So, even if you buy lesser expensive tools, at least buy regular sized ones.

NO WAY…too big a risk the wife would see it! :)

FWIW, I keep an excel spreadsheet of my shop spendings, and I am in just shy of 6k for a single-car garage shop. This is taking almost everything into account, from the floor tiles to the lighting, and everything in between. At least half of which is machinery cost… That said, size of shop shouldn t matter a ton. If I were in a space 3x as large, my costs wouldn t be significantly higher, lighting and floor tiles would be a bit more, I would probably have a few more machines (drum sander being a certain, and maybe a small CNC).

*Edit – Well, just realized this is in the HAND TOOL sub-forum. DOH! This post probably doesn t apply.

- ste6168


View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#11 posted 03-25-2016 06:27 PM

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#12 posted 03-25-2016 06:43 PM

From the ‘already have’ list I see NO routers. I think at least two routers are needed in every shop. One for a table and one for hand. I rare build anything that does not involve a router. After that I would buy as needed tools for the job at hand.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#13 posted 03-25-2016 06:44 PM

AND I like your organised chaos!

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#14 posted 03-25-2016 07:02 PM

For me, I’d get a TS, and a jointer and a planer. Milling your work is huge step.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#15 posted 03-25-2016 07:13 PM

Why are people recommending power tools? He has power tools. He wants hand tools.

$2k would be way more than you’d need for used hand tools. I’d get used hand tools to start. Clean them up, get them working well. Stanley’s pre-WWII for planes, Disston saws, old stanley 750’s for chisels, make a couple mallets, get a couple more good squares in various sizes, etc.

For planes, I’d get a block plane (#65 is my personal choice), smoother (#4 or #4 1/2), Jack (#5), and Jointer (#7 or #8). You will also greatly benefit from a router plane and potentially a shoulder plane. If you want to cut molding profiles, beads, and dadoes/rabbets by hand, then a #45 would be a good choice.

Chisels, you could go with the 750’s like I mentioned, or used Japanese chisels from ebay since you wanted Japanese tools.

If you want to buy new japanese tools, your best bet is to get them directly from Japan. Cheaper, even with shipping, though it takes longer to get here.

http://toolsfromjapan.com/store/

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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