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Forum topic by ghazard posted 03-09-2010 02:40 AM 992 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ghazard

382 posts in 2977 days


03-09-2010 02:40 AM

Hi all. I am in the shop trying to get some work on a chess board done tonight and I need advise before I make the next cut.

See here for the whole story…

but basically this…I have a 14×14x7/8 thick slab of paudk that I need to keep from warping (it warped overnight after I planed it flat) so I will cut it into a few smaller pieces to break up the large slab and glue in some decorative accent strips.

Should I rip or cross cut the paduk?

I think cross cut so that the accent pieces, which will be oriented 90deg from the grain of the paduk will help stop any warp tendency.

What say you, oh wise ones?

Thanks!

Greg

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"


5 replies so far

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JuniorJoiner

463 posts in 2908 days


#1 posted 03-09-2010 02:56 AM

ripping will help relieve the tension for cupping, but not warping. if it is truely warping and twisting, I say find a different piece to use, or wait for the piece to settle down.

Did you only plane one side flat? because that is the problem if you did. if you expose wetter wood on one side and not the other, the wet side dries out and shrinks, cupping to that side.

-- Junior -Quality is never an accident-it is the reward for the effort involved.

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ghazard

382 posts in 2977 days


#2 posted 03-09-2010 03:02 AM

I’m sorry…I should have said cupping. It is cupping only.

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

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wdwrkr

26 posts in 2469 days


#3 posted 03-09-2010 03:22 AM

The best thing to do is wait for the material to stabilize before trying to flatten it. Each time you remove material, you expose surfaces that contain their own stresses. These stresses always balance out in any board. But if you remove material, say from one side only, you may lose the balance, hence the need to wait until the board achieves its balance again. That’s not to say the board will be flat, just that it will stop moving (assuming the moisture content stays constant). That said, when you plane the board to flatten it again you might well have the problem again. Someone posted before me that you should remove material from each side of your board in equal amounts and they are right. That will help a lot.
If you cut the board into strips, cut it so the strips are each as close to riftsawn as possible (quartersawn is best, but you can’t get there with the board you have). This will force you to lose the middle section of the board (nearest the pith – it’s also the least stable).

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ghazard

382 posts in 2977 days


#4 posted 03-11-2010 03:38 PM

thanks for the help on this guys. I ripped the paduk into 4 pieces, removed some additional material nearest the pith, per wdwrkr’s suggestion, alternated grain on every other strip and glued back together with 2 strips of maple and one cherry to build back the width I lost. It held stable overnight…so we’ll see.

I’m not very good at taking pictures during a project but I’m trying to during this build. I’ll put a little blog together about how I layout the squares…assuming it works as planed!

Thanks again.

Greg

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

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wdwrkr

26 posts in 2469 days


#5 posted 03-12-2010 12:33 AM

Sounds great. Once you take the clamps off, it will need more time to dry to allow the moisture in the glue to make its way out. During that time, the board can distort, so clamp some boards across both faces to keep your board in-plane during this time. Two days should be more than plenty, but if you can’t get back to the project, keep it clamped up until you’re ready to work on it. Sounds like it is going to be beautiful. Can’t wait to see.

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