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Forum topic by MalcolmLaurel posted 03-25-2016 12:30 AM 696 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MalcolmLaurel

269 posts in 1091 days


03-25-2016 12:30 AM

Some wood from a local (CT) place that sells reclaimed lumber… they have a barrel of small scraps outside, $10 per wheelbarrow load, proceeds to the local soup kitchen. It’s intended for firewood, but they’re good sizes for my kinds of projects. Anyway, I’m working on a small table. The first piece I think is hickory from old floorboards; it’s certainly hard enough:

I filled the large knot and gouges with clear casting resin, but I’m leaving all the wormholes alone.

The second piece I have no idea:

It’s also quite hard, too close grained, I think, to be oak.

The twisty curved piece, of course, is my favorite mountain laurel.

Tomorrow I’ll finish sanding and start shellacking.

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com


9 replies so far

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1944 days


#1 posted 03-25-2016 01:02 AM

The first piece looks like chestnut.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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MalcolmLaurel

269 posts in 1091 days


#2 posted 03-25-2016 02:07 AM

Definitely not chestnut. I’ve worked with a lot of chestnut and this is nothing like it. Too hard and too yellow (the color doesn’t come out that good in the photos).

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1944 days


#3 posted 03-25-2016 11:38 AM

Then how about mulberry or black locust? Post a close up pic of the end grain.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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MalcolmLaurel

269 posts in 1091 days


#4 posted 03-25-2016 10:13 PM

Here’s another endgrain pic:

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

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MalcolmLaurel

269 posts in 1091 days


#5 posted 03-29-2016 10:04 PM

I showed another piece of the same stuff to a friend who recently milled a bunch of black locust from a tree in his hard and he’s of the opinion that it’s not locust… “not yellow enough”, he says. Though the piece I showed him does look more like chestnut, but it still seems too hard. He’s of the opinion that the other piece on the underside of the table is maple, and I buy that.

Whatever it is, it sure looks nice with many coats of shellac:

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1944 days


#6 posted 03-31-2016 12:12 PM

My money is still on mulberry or black locust.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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ShaneA

6476 posts in 2066 days


#7 posted 03-31-2016 01:21 PM

It does have the same grain as the mulberry I am used to seeing.

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MalcolmLaurel

269 posts in 1091 days


#8 posted 04-08-2016 12:59 AM

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Johnalan1

39 posts in 362 days


#9 posted 04-08-2016 01:09 AM

I know a guy that has a lot of wormy chestnut, and it looks exactly like it, explaining the hardness, your piece might be really dry considering it was reclaimed it might have been in a house never seeing water beside the occasional spill for years.

-- John Darlington Sc https://www.etsy.com/shop/JohnsScrollsaw

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