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New woodworker... Band Saw motor replacement question - AC to DC?

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Forum topic by 13o13 posted 03-23-2016 04:16 PM 442 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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13o13

5 posts in 255 days


03-23-2016 04:16 PM

New guy here… moving from lurking/learning to my first post!

I am very new to woodworking, and have recently acquired a 10” Rockwell 28-113 BS for a very low price. In addition to the 3/8 blade, it also came with a brand new Olson 1/2” blade. It’s powered by a 1/3 HP motor. I’ve had a lot of fun learning on it, and of course am now wishing for a much larger BS.

A couple of weekends ago, at an estate sale, I picked up a few decent size osage orange logs. They are quite old/seasoned. Everything that I’ve read about resawing recommends having, in addition to a bigger BS, which, sadly, is not an option for me right now, at least a 1 HP motor to handle bigger/more dense wood.

I have a line on a 1 HP, 10amp/90 volt DC motor, for a reasonable price. I have read on various forums that DC motors and an electronic speed controller are great for converting a wood BS to a metal BS. I have zero interest in using my BS to cut metal, therefore reducing the speed is not an issue for me.

My question is simple… hopefully the answer is, too. Will I be able to simply swap the 1/3 HP AC motor with the 1 HP DC motor, or are there additional steps or equipment I would need to take care of, as well?

Any help/insight you all can provide is greatly appreciated!

-Bob


6 replies so far

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 03-23-2016 04:19 PM

I’m not an electrician or an EE, but AFAIK you’ll need to add a rectifier (or some way) to switch AC from the wall to DC.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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13o13

5 posts in 255 days


#2 posted 03-23-2016 05:24 PM

...that’s the simple answer I was hoping for. Thanks so much!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#3 posted 03-23-2016 05:38 PM

Just as a reference, the manual for a 14” Delta recommends a 1/3hp motor for normal use, and a 1/2hp motor for heavy duty use or thick resaws with a riser block. As long as your blade is sharp, you can resaw almost anything, although perhaps not as fast.

That said, why buy a DC motor when you can get one for free or really, really cheap? Find a used treadmill on CL, and it will have pretty much everything you need – motor, power supply, speed control, wiring, etc… and they are typically around 2hp +/-:

I’ve found 4 for free in the last year or so, and in addition to the motor stuff, you get a ton of extra goodies as well, such as all kinds of hardware, bearing mounted rollers, stepper motor, material suitable for use as a router table top, and on and on….

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2542 days


#4 posted 03-23-2016 05:52 PM

Not sure how the connects to the wheel that drives the blade, but a 1 HP should have a bigger diameter shaft and you will need to adapt something for it to fit.

-- Chris K

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13o13

5 posts in 255 days


#5 posted 03-23-2016 08:11 PM



Just as a reference, the manual for a 14” Delta recommends a 1/3hp motor for normal use, and a 1/2hp motor for heavy duty use or thick resaws with a riser block. As long as your blade is sharp, you can resaw almost anything, although perhaps not as fast.

I was hoping for 3/4 or more horses… I’ll expand my search to include 1/2. Should make it easier, and less $$.


That said, why buy a DC motor when you can get one for free or really, really cheap? Find a used treadmill on CL, and it will have pretty much everything you need – motor, power supply, speed control, wiring, etc… and they are typically around 2hp +/-:
Good tip… I’ll keep that in mind, as well.


Not sure how the connects to the wheel that drives the blade, but a 1 HP should have a bigger diameter shaft and you will need to adapt something for it to fit.

- ChrisK

The 1 HP DC motor I referenced above has a 5/8” shaft, which is the same size as the 1/3 HP motor I currently use. If it was different size, an appropriately sized motor pulley isn’t that difficult to acquire.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

754 posts in 1455 days


#6 posted 03-23-2016 10:04 PM

If you have any mechanical engineering saavy friends, you may ask the to look at the rest of the drive train and see if it can handle 3x the power. If its belt driven you may be OK as the belt might just slip. But there could be a scenario where you push the wood harder/faster, the motor is trying to push more HP to make the cut, and the weak point gives.

Kinda like how you have to beef up the clutch plates on a car when you install certain turbo or supercharger kits.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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