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Forum topic by Woodchuck2010 posted 03-22-2016 03:07 AM 1177 views 1 time favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Woodchuck2010

504 posts in 319 days


03-22-2016 03:07 AM

I just made this endtable top and I love the grain. It’s a really nice birch top. I’ve been testing finishes on scrap and nothing looks good. I’ve tried pre finishes, stains, polys and am not happy with any. Everything is blotchy. I’m thinking about just varnishing it and calling it good.

-- Chuck, Michigan,


44 replies so far

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3037 days


#1 posted 03-22-2016 03:09 AM

Charles Neil Blotch control; and general finishes dye/stain.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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USAwoodArt

243 posts in 403 days


#2 posted 03-22-2016 03:09 AM

Have you tried Danish Oil?

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

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Woodchuck2010

504 posts in 319 days


#3 posted 03-22-2016 03:14 AM



Have you tried Danish Oil?

- theSoutherner


Yes. Watco. I’ve tried 2 different colors with no luck. IMO

-- Chuck, Michigan,

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Woodchuck2010

504 posts in 319 days


#4 posted 03-22-2016 03:16 AM


Charles Neil Blotch control; and general finishes dye/stain.

- a1Jim


??? I’ve never heard of it or seen it at stores.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3037 days


#5 posted 03-22-2016 03:22 AM

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Woodchuck2010

504 posts in 319 days


#6 posted 03-22-2016 03:57 AM

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bruc101

1077 posts in 3002 days


#7 posted 03-22-2016 03:59 AM

You won’ go wrong with Charles Neil’s Blotch control if you follow his instructions on how to use it.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#8 posted 03-22-2016 03:59 AM

The results I’ve seen online look awesome.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3037 days


#9 posted 03-22-2016 04:05 AM

Glad to help Chuck

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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upinflames

209 posts in 1622 days


#10 posted 03-22-2016 11:16 AM

Wash coat of 1lb. cut of de-waxed shellac sanded back with 220 grit or a 6:1 mix of pva glue and water(glue sizing, the same stuff folks try to sell at a premium) then sanded back the same as the shellac. A coat of poly should not be blotchy, stain ,maybe….

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#11 posted 03-22-2016 11:29 AM

The best pieces in the world are in museums covered in shellac and MAYBE some paste wax.

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Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#12 posted 03-22-2016 11:55 AM

“Blotching” is simply some part of the grain absorbing more color than other parts. There are a couple of solutions. One would be to use a gel stain, since it’s a gel it doesn’t get absorbed as much as the normal varieties making the color more uniform. The second is a wash coat (or sealer). Both are very thin finishes, the washcoat being thinner. A washcoat allows the color to be absorbed more evenly, a sealer prevents it being absorbed. But you can make your own but taking varnish and thinning it or using a light shellac. If you use shellac and plan on topping it with anything”poly”, it pays to use a dawaxed shellac since urethane resins often inhibit adhesion of the top coat.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#13 posted 03-22-2016 07:38 PM

About blotching.http://lumberjocks.com/OSU55/blog

Cheap easy method with products you probably already have.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3037 days


#14 posted 03-22-2016 08:25 PM

Woodchuck
Most of what OSU stated in his blog is true except he says that products he hasn’t used have certain ingredients in them which may,or may not be true. Many of the old approaches work but with different degrees of success on different woods. If you want to experiment with older versions of blotch control that others have suggested ,go for it ,but try them on a sample board first. I recommended Charles blotch control because I’ve found it be the most effective and consistent of all of the techniques I’ve used. Like many subjects on LJs finishing and it’s varies aspects have many folks saying their approach is best ,I know it’s hard to determine who knows of what the speak and who doesn’t. I’ve always looked at folks finished projects to help me evaluate who’s proof is in the pudding so to speak. Take a look at Charles finished work and read his info on finishing and I think you’ll conclude he knows what he’s talking about,this is not to say that others don’t know what they’re doing, but possibly to a lesser degree.

http://www.cn-woodworking.com/dining-furniture/

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#15 posted 03-22-2016 08:44 PM

Brush on some Rustoleum machine gray. :)

Just kidding.

I’ve used Minwax’s Pre-stain in pine and it stained up nicely. Not very sophisticated but it worked.

(Or there is always the Rustoleum.)

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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