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Forum topic by B Woodruff posted 03-21-2016 11:48 AM 1417 views 0 times favorited 74 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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B Woodruff

65 posts in 1043 days


03-21-2016 11:48 AM

So with the help of Knotscott and a few others on this forum I was able to pick up a Delta contractor saw with a Unifence. Thank you so much for all the assistance. It took several weeks to finally get one I was happy with. (anybody wanting to read throw that thread or a see a pic of my Delta at the bottom, just follow this link: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/145106#reply-2544178).

Now with that said, onto my next question regarding the saw…the Unifence. My Unifence seems hard to lock into place. I know once it’s locked on, it does stay put and is accurate. However, there is a lot of fuss for me trying to lock it down or move it to a new position. It doesn’t really “slide down the rail”. I’m not sure if this is normal or if there is some “tweaking” I need to do with the fence. I have looked through the forums to see if others have mentioned this (before I bugged everybody) but didn’t see anything that was really related to my questions. Oh yeah, and I also did Google and YouTube searches. LOL. The next step is taking a look at the online user manual (or maybe downloading one) and reading through it.

But if anybody has a spare second and would like to throw out some guidance or knowledge my way (or can provide me a link to something similar), please do. I will post the two questions below again for clarification.

1. Is it suppose to pretty much glide down the rail to the new position or is it normal for me to unlock it and pretty much take it off the rail and insert it to the new location?

2. When trying to lock it down, I have to play with the handle (like rotating it back and forth so the locking nut) can grab the rail. This causes me to not usually get it exactly on the measurement I am looking for.

Maybe its just my novice skills showing themselves…and that’s perfectly okay – but if there is a tweak I can perform, I’d like to know it.

Thanks in advance.
Regards/Bernie


74 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#1 posted 03-21-2016 12:30 PM

Yes, you unlock and it slides right down the rail. On the one I had, crud could build up inside the rail and make it not slide smoothly, but I never had to pull it out and move it. Sounds to me like the clamp is set too tight, as I recall (I sold the saw some time back) on mine they were 2 large black hex head plastic pieces on the front that were adjusted for clamp force. In my case the arbor wrench fit those hex heads. Maybe loosen those up (very slightly) until it clamps with a little less force? That same thing could (should) be causing the problem with the fence sliding back and forth on the rail. Be aware, those same bolts also align the fence to be parallel with the blade. The manual explains it better than I can. If you don’t have one click the link (start at page 10). Nice saw, I had that same one with a Unifence.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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B Woodruff

65 posts in 1043 days


#2 posted 03-21-2016 12:57 PM

Wow, great insight Fred. Exactly what I was hoping for. Thanks for those tips and the link to the manual too!

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2597 days


#3 posted 03-21-2016 07:08 PM

Be aware that those two large screws also adjust the fence alignment, so if you don’t back them out exactly the same, your fence alignment will change.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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teejk02

424 posts in 591 days


#4 posted 03-21-2016 07:32 PM

Mine is about 15 yrs old now and I have never had to touch it! But since I’m supposed to be working on tax returns I went and sat in the shop (I hate doing tax returns) and pulled out the manual (I cut my finger nails yesterday so that was not an option). Mine is adjusted so it is tight at about 4 o’clock when viewing from the front. You have the manual and it is pretty well explained in there. “Tiny” adjustments are the key…and don’t forget that changing the tension will require the fence be re-aligned to the blade…Unless you have abnormal wear I think you are going to love that fence (I do).

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B Woodruff

65 posts in 1043 days


#5 posted 03-21-2016 08:25 PM

Yeah, as novice as I am, I don’t plan on touching those big hex nuts. But whenever I unlock mine, it just seems to come off the rail. I can slide it down the rail but it’s very loose. I printed the manual and will have a looksee shortly. I have the 32in fence. Thanks for the feedback so far everyone.

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teejk02

424 posts in 591 days


#6 posted 03-21-2016 09:06 PM



Yeah, as novice as I am, I don t plan on touching those big hex nuts. But whenever I unlock mine, it just seems to come off the rail. I can slide it down the rail but it s very loose. I printed the manual and will have a looksee shortly. I have the 32in fence. Thanks for the feedback so far everyone.

- B Woodruff

Sounds like something is wrong…the system is pretty simple. You have the machined aluminum “keyed” front rail. You have the front mounted locking lever (pull it up and twist counter clock-wise just enough to move the fence…twist it far enough and the internal locking mechanism will align with the “keyed” slot on the rail so you can remove it (e.g. for longer cross-cuts or any operation where you don’t want the fence). When returned to 90 degree and tightened down the internal locking bar will be at about 10 o’clock on the top, 4 o’clock on the bottom and press against the inside walls of the aluminum rail. The locking pressure is supplied by the machined “cams” close to the locking lever.

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 355 days


#7 posted 03-21-2016 09:17 PM

I had a uni-fence on my first Unisaw and had the same issues you are experiencing,that’s why I switch to a biesemeyer (less moving parts) on my next saw.They can be very finicky,and I guess I just didn’t have the patience to deal with it.Then again I’ve used them in other shops ,and they worked like they were supposed to.So to answer your question…I DUN KNOW..

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

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B Woodruff

65 posts in 1043 days


#8 posted 03-21-2016 10:00 PM

Wait…could this be the problem. Is the clamp bracket (or whatever it is called that I’m pointing at) suppose to be able to move front to back as well as rotating with the handle? See how in the pic it is diagonal and not parallel to the fence back (or level with the thin red line I added). I wonder if there is a way to lock that bracket so that it doesn’t move (other than to rotate)...thoughts?

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teejk02

424 posts in 591 days


#9 posted 03-21-2016 10:04 PM



I had a uni-fence on my first Unisaw and had the same issues you are experiencing,that s why I switch to a biesemeyer (less moving parts) on my next saw.They can be very finicky,and I guess I just didn t have the patience to deal with it.Then again I ve used them in other shops ,and they worked like they were supposed to.So to answer your question…I DUN KNOW..

- chiseler

Guess I got a good one! Have never had to touch the factory settings in 15 years. Of course that doesn’t mean I have not moved the fence front/back or side to side but those are all external parts and easy to do. When I bought the saw I had the choice between the Beis and the Uni (at the time both owned by the same company and no difference in price)...no regrets in opting for the latter. I think it is a much more versatile fence when I comes to feather boards and such. Now I can see where the Uni could be ruined if abused…the internal locking channel is extruded aluminum and I guess a person might be able to mess it up.

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teejk02

424 posts in 591 days


#10 posted 03-21-2016 10:09 PM



Wait…could this be the problem. Is the clamp bracket (or whatever it is called that I m pointing at) suppose to be able to move front to back as well as rotating with the handle? See how in the pic it is diagonal and not parallel to the fence back (or level with the thin red line I added). I wonder if there is a way to lock that bracket so that it doesn t move (other than to rotate)...thoughts?

- B Woodruff

I don’t that is “factory issue”. Will look at mine tomorrow but I don’t think it is a flat bar, rather more of a “butterfly” shape.

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B Woodruff

65 posts in 1043 days


#11 posted 03-21-2016 10:54 PM

Here is pic from a different angle. I think I’ve seen this same bracket on other Unifence’s here on Lumberjocks…but you are thinking its not? Yes, let me know if you get a chance to look at yours later teejk02.

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teejk02

424 posts in 591 days


#12 posted 03-21-2016 11:26 PM



Here is pic from a different angle. I think I ve seen this same bracket on other Unifence s here on Lumberjocks…but you are thinking its not? Yes, let me know if you get a chance to look at yours later teejk02.

- B Woodruff

Will do! Your last pix shows what I was used to seeing…not happy to see all that abuse on that part though. That is hardened steel whereas your rail is extruded aluminum (or if you live in the UK you would say aluminium) and the latter should be the weak link. But it doesn’t look too bad. Check your front rail channel for obvious signs of deflection (doubtful…is pretty heavy duty stuff). Then just follow the book. If not clear, holler and I can scan and send pages from mine (relevant parts only a 2-3 pages).

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 355 days


#13 posted 03-22-2016 03:15 AM



Wait…could this be the problem. Is the clamp bracket (or whatever it is called that I m pointing at) suppose to be able to move front to back as well as rotating with the handle? See how in the pic it is diagonal and not parallel to the fence back (or level with the thin red line I added). I wonder if there is a way to lock that bracket so that it doesn t move (other than to rotate)...thoughts?

you are supposed to be able to rotate that piece with the handle in order to remove the fence, it is part of the clamping mechanism.the problem I had was keeping it from rotating while sliding the fence back and forth so the fence wouldn’t disconnect every time I moved it,a real PITA

- B Woodruff


-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 355 days


#14 posted 03-22-2016 03:26 AM


I had a uni-fence on my first Unisaw and had the same issues you are experiencing,that s why I switch to a biesemeyer (less moving parts) on my next saw.They can be very finicky,and I guess I just didn t have the patience to deal with it.Then again I ve used them in other shops ,and they worked like they were supposed to.So to answer your question…I DUN KNOW..

- chiseler
Guess I got a good one! Have never had to touch the factory settings in 15 years. Of course that doesn t mean I have not moved the fence front/back or side to side but those are all external parts and easy to do. When I bought the saw I had the choice between the Beis and the Uni (at the time both owned by the same company and no difference in price)...no regrets in opting for the latter. I think it is a much more versatile fence when I comes to feather boards and such. Now I can see where the Uni could be ruined if abused…the internal locking channel is extruded aluminum and I guess a person might be able to mess it up.

- teejk02


Yeah I hear,ya, I don’t know what the problem was with mine all I do know is ,it was frustrating,and you sorta touch on it Tee,I didn’t get it brand new,so maybe it got tweeked in a bad way.I know a number of people that swear by them

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#15 posted 03-22-2016 11:09 AM

I don’t remember my clamp finger moving that way, but I never looked at it that closely. If you look at the hole (second photo) it’s drilled wide to allow for that movement (I would think). I’d guess you’re imagining problems when there aren’t any. Making the adjustments to get the right clamping pressure and alignment should have you in good shape. I suppose it’s possible the too-tight clamping pressure from the current setup may have damaged something, but if it did someone really put the force to it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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