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This wood is dulling my blades

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Forum topic by Putttn posted 03-20-2016 01:29 PM 859 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Putttn

53 posts in 1739 days


03-20-2016 01:29 PM

I’ve got a bunch of pallets that I cut up to make a outdoor “Workbench” and yesterday I was running one of the shorter pieces through my Ridgid jointer and ended up with some really dull blades. What the heck to they make these pallets with. Nailing into the pallets was really difficult and drilling was also a pretty good challenge. My blades were sharp but wow this stuff is tough.

-- Bill eastern Washington


19 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#1 posted 03-20-2016 01:38 PM

Might be Ash.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4449 posts in 3421 days


#2 posted 03-20-2016 01:47 PM

Did you clean the wood first?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 03-20-2016 01:52 PM

I’d hit any found wood with a pressure washer first. When I did a fieldstone patio the pallets the stone came on were all four quarter hardwood for the slats – great to reuse but really dusty and gritty.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3928 posts in 1954 days


#4 posted 03-20-2016 02:18 PM



Did you clean the wood first?
Bill

- Bill White


Good question, the dirt and embedded grit is harder on the knives than the wood.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#5 posted 03-20-2016 02:41 PM

I think a lot of pallets use what we call “scrub oak”. Long twisting fibers. Wonder if some might use what we call rock elm (try to burn some and you’ll know it…that smell of a dirty mens room)?

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Putttn

53 posts in 1739 days


#6 posted 03-20-2016 05:24 PM

All I know is this wood is almost impossible to pound a nail into and can really take a beating. My outdoor workbench has really taken a beating and all I do is throw some oil on the surface a it looks great.
I wondered what I could make with this stuff and someone suggested a mallet. It would be perfect for that.

-- Bill eastern Washington

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teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#7 posted 03-20-2016 05:51 PM



All I know is this wood is almost impossible to pound a nail into and can really take a beating. My outdoor workbench has really taken a beating and all I do is throw some oil on the surface a it looks great.
I wondered what I could make with this stuff and someone suggested a mallet. It would be perfect for that.

- Putttn

Might be one of the elm’s I was thinking…hard as a rock https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_thomasii

View ShipWreck's profile

ShipWreck

557 posts in 3213 days


#8 posted 03-20-2016 05:54 PM

Definitely pressure wash any pallet wood. The semi vans get a lot of dust floating around, and pallete are often left in the dirt. I nicked up a couple No#5 plane blades by skipping the pressure washing.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#9 posted 03-20-2016 06:06 PM

I use a scrub plane or an old planer to with dull knives to surface all of the faces of any dirty wood. Only after that will I send it through a good blade or set a lot knives.

Dirt and sand kill blades.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Andre's profile

Andre

1021 posts in 1267 days


#10 posted 03-20-2016 06:54 PM

I toasted the HSS inserts on my General planer by running a bunch of Mahogany and Teak through it! Mahogany was about 50 years old and had a varnish finish.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

393 posts in 680 days


#11 posted 03-20-2016 09:00 PM

sounds like hard maple.
pics would help us.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1636 posts in 1777 days


#12 posted 03-20-2016 09:15 PM

Never put dirty wood through your good machines. It you really want to do a lot of reclaimed projects, it might be worthwhile to invest in a cheap, handheld planer to clean up the surface before going to the machines.

I can see ironwood damaging blades but none of the domestics should cause that much damage. I plane and joint ash, oak, hickory and plenty of hard maple and only sharpen the blade once a year at the most. This is in a shop that goes through at least 3,000bf in a year.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#13 posted 03-20-2016 10:40 PM

JAAune makes a great case for hitting Harbor Freight for a handheld planer and buying the extended warranty for it.

View Putttn's profile

Putttn

53 posts in 1739 days


#14 posted 03-21-2016 12:08 AM

I’ve got a good old Craftsman planer from the 70’s that hasn’t seen hardly any action so I’ll getit our and get after this stuff. Also have a good Lie Nielsen scrub that could use some exercise

-- Bill eastern Washington

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#15 posted 03-21-2016 12:13 AM

Looks like red oak. Whatever it is, those huge pores collect a lot of dirt and crap. Especially as a pallet. Scrub planes work but an unused planer would make quick work of it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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