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Natural cherry finish: Use CN Blotch control?

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Forum topic by Jthomps123 posted 03-17-2016 11:41 PM 956 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jthomps123

3 posts in 1451 days


03-17-2016 11:41 PM

Im working on a cherry tv stand using aged cherry. My plan was just to use ArmRSeal topcoat.

Its a bit ‘figured’ here and there, i dabbed some MinWax wipe on poly onto a scrap piece and the client would prefer not to see much of the figure (the part that lightens/darkens depending on light and angle).

Would Charles Neil blotch control have any effect on this?

Also has anyone else used CN Blotch Control when finishing cherry naturally? If so how applications coats worked best? Thanks for any input!

Jason


14 replies so far

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

818 posts in 2019 days


#1 posted 03-18-2016 12:25 AM

I have used CN Blotch Control many times and I love it. I used it on poplar when I was making a mockup chest and used BC as directed and then applied water based dye to mimic aged cherry. No blotching period. I have also used it on cherry and pine with the same results.
I highly recommend it.

-- Jerry

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upinflames

217 posts in 1946 days


#2 posted 03-18-2016 12:36 AM

Waste of time and money if you do just topcoat, glue sizing is used when you stain or dye a blotch prone wood.

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CharlesA

3286 posts in 1582 days


#3 posted 03-18-2016 01:49 AM

the cherry will even out over time.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4651 posts in 2278 days


#4 posted 03-18-2016 11:22 AM

Any of the sealing products are just very thin finish, and they will do what you want. Since it’s a customer, I’d say you have to do as they wish…but to me “blotching” is just figure in the wood that should be seen. As Charles said, this will even out some over time

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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OSU55

1364 posts in 1774 days


#5 posted 03-18-2016 11:49 AM

I haven’t used CN blotch control, but I’ve used glue sizing which works the same and is much cheaper, and yes, it works even with OB poly to control the blotching on cherry. ~ 1 to 5 Elmer’s glue all with water, one coat, allow to completely soak the wood and wipe off. Using a clear, non ambering WB finish vs ob poly would work as well.

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jklingel

53 posts in 941 days


#6 posted 03-19-2016 06:45 PM

“Glue sizing”? Learn something every day here. Do you just use it on woods that tend to blotch, or is it useful for other purposes? How long do you wait after applying the mix before you apply finish? Overnight? Will other glues, like Titebond III, work as well?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4651 posts in 2278 days


#7 posted 03-19-2016 06:50 PM

I’ve never used as OSU55 described, but it’s great for sealing the milled ends of MDF panels to get them to hold a smooth finish, like on raised panels or a bevel cut and such.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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jbay

1741 posts in 684 days


#8 posted 03-19-2016 07:03 PM



Any of the sealing products are just very thin finish, and they will do what you want. Since it s a customer, I d say you have to do as they wish…but to me “blotching” is just figure in the wood that should be seen. As Charles said, this will even out some over time

- Fred Hargis

I agree!
I think most of the problem comes from the stain application. If you’re wiping on stain, everywhere you overlap darkens the wood and leaves a blotching look, depending on the type stain. JMO
I spray the stain so that I can cover the whole panel, then wipe off keeping everything consistent.
On larger panels I do half the panel (with the grain) wipe, then the other half. I like the Natural Absorption that the wood takes on.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1364 posts in 1774 days


#9 posted 03-19-2016 09:11 PM

The glue sizing acts as a sealer, and is used as any other sealer: for blotch control, end grain, mdf, etc. Wait until dry – depends on temp, humidity, and how much the wood soaked up. Anywhere from 1-4 hrs usually. Any pva glue works, I use Elmer’s glue all because it dries clear and doesn’t effect color.

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bonesbr549

1437 posts in 2851 days


#10 posted 03-20-2016 12:40 AM

I’ve used his BC and it works as advertised. I don’t call it blotching myself but blushing and like it myself. However I’ve had clients that prefer the even look and it will help. You can minimize with dyes and never use a stain. When I want to color to get that 100 year look with out the waiting, his is an excellent product and is worth it.

That’s my opinion and that and a buck fifty will get you a cup of coffee.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View jklingel's profile

jklingel

53 posts in 941 days


#11 posted 03-20-2016 03:30 AM

thanks for the info on glue sizing. i would have never guessed what it does from the name. i will add it to my small data bank of knowledge…. on another note, is there anything to be gained by using glue sizing, then sanding, to minimize grain raising before you add finish? an old woodshop teacher told me to do that, but he did not call it by name. he said the grain will raise, then get sanded off, not to raise again. it does not seem to do much in my limited attempts. cheers. j

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1364 posts in 1774 days


#12 posted 03-20-2016 01:09 PM

Water and water based products cause grain raising, oil or alcohol based do not. If you are using a water based stain/dye, after your final sanding, squirt water, distilled if your tap water leaves stains (test it!), all over the project surface (do one side/section at a time) until absorption stops, then wipe off. Usually 5 min or so. Let dry. Use the next grit up to lightly sand the raised grain smooth. If it hasn’t helped, either you didn’t soak the wood enough, or over sanded the raised grain, which is easy to do. If blotching is a concern, use glue sizing instead of plain water.

If you are applying a WB finish on bare wood, most all are self sealing. Just apply the first coat of finish, let dry, then sand smooth and apply another coat. Nothing really gained by using plain water first to raise the grain.

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Fred Hargis

4651 posts in 2278 days


#13 posted 03-20-2016 02:20 PM


If you are applying a WB finish on bare wood, most all are self sealing. Just apply the first coat of finish, let dry, then sand smooth and apply another coat. Nothing really gained by using plain water first to raise the grain.

- OSU55

This is worth repeating. After the first coat of finish is applied to a surface with reaised grain, the finish locks the fibers in place…sand it smooth and apply whatever additional coats you need.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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jklingel

53 posts in 941 days


#14 posted 03-20-2016 04:07 PM

Thanks, once again! john

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