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Forum topic by TuffO posted 03-17-2016 05:48 AM 720 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TuffO

15 posts in 678 days


03-17-2016 05:48 AM

Hello gentleman! Long time lurker here. Finally posting and ready to ask some questions of you all. I am new to the world of traditional hand tool woodworking. I grew up in the trades and am a rough an finish carpenter by trade. I am new to the use and care of traditional woodworking tools in the aspect of furniture making (which is what I am starting to do for fun). I have accumulated a decent collection of tools and related items and it is time to start refurbishing them back to service. The main tools that I need to work on are my planes and handsaws. I have some questions about the processes of bringing these back to service.

For my hand planes I am dissembling them and doing them one at a time to keep all the parts straight. After a general light cleaning I need to get the rust off the metal parts. As far as i can tell Evapo-Rust is the best product for this, is that a correct assessment? after that I need to get everything flattened back down. I have a flat marble slab and tried to use wet/dry sandpaper on top but it is taking forever. Is there a faster or more effective way to true the sole? Can I lap it? Or is there a more effective way like a diamond plate or something? (I need to be able to do sizes from a small block plane up to a Stanley No 6). After that i need to sharpen the blades and tune the chip breaker. What systems do you guys use to do this? Got Links?

After my planes I need to work on my hand saws. I want to get all the rust off of the plates and all the dirt and grim off of the tote. I have heard of guys using WD40 and wet/dry sand paper to clean up the plate. I was wondering if there is a more efficient way to clean the plates like using the Evapo-Rust. My concern is that it will remove the etchings though, which I of course want to leave in tacked. I have also heard of using navel jelly to remove rust but again in don’t want the etchings affected and I don’t know how it would affect wood if I happened to get some on the tote for example.

Thank you for reading through this long winded post and I really appreciate any information, links or other pages you guys can provide. These are not all the questions I have but a good starting point to help me get started in this journey. You all are great bunch of people on here and I can’t wait to show off the newly restored tools thanks to you all. Cheers!


14 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#1 posted 03-17-2016 11:03 AM

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2385 posts in 744 days


#2 posted 03-17-2016 11:18 AM

Don’s the master. I have been using evap-o-rust, but I don’t like using liquids in the winter. Too cold in my garage shop. So I am coverting to the no soak method Don W and also Paul Sellers advocate. Check out both Don W website above and search out Paul Sellers video on restoring a bench plane.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1063 posts in 1456 days


#3 posted 03-17-2016 11:44 AM

How to Evaporust. Tuning hand planes. Some use a belt sander to speed up sole flattening. I’ve used my 3×21 handheld on a few that were significantly out of flat, but the platen isn’t big enough – a larger belt sander will help. You will need to finish by hand on a flat surface with paper/belt. Even 50-60 grit can take a while, especially for 6 and 7’s – that’s a lot of cast iron. Sometimes the sole needs a bit of touch up, in particular the longer ones and if it warped significantly to begin with. Cast iron can take some time to relieve stresses.

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chrisstef

15676 posts in 2473 days


#4 posted 03-17-2016 12:28 PM

I’m not a huge fan of evaporust on saws. Sometimes it will leave staining where the rust has lifted off and settled back down on the plate. Harbor freight makes some decent sanding wheels that ill chuck up in a corded drill to remove the heavy rust and then ill use their sanding balls in a drill to finish. With that said you may not find an etch on every saw so I like to investigate with some 320 sandpaper by hand first. If its there, ill be careful, if not, ill go hog wild.

As to the handles its best to take them off before working on the plate if you can. I typically use a card scraper to remove any finish on the handle then ill sand a bit with 220 and finish with shellac and wax.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2385 posts in 744 days


#5 posted 03-17-2016 11:46 PM

Concerning Saws. I have used evap-o-prust, navel jelly, and scarping. With evap-o-rust I laid two saws in a boot tray. One lost an etch the other gained an etch (I did not see). With navel jelly I have lost an etch. Scraping with a razor I have not lost an etch. It is however slower.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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TuffO

15 posts in 678 days


#6 posted 03-18-2016 01:40 AM

Awesome thank you guys! Some other questions I have since starting off from the guidance is what do you use on bare steel once you have cleaned and restored it to prevent the rust from coming back? Also how does Evapo-Rust affect wood? I have a brace that needs cleaned up but obviously cant remove the wooden handles. Have any suggestions for saving it? Additionally I have a couple planes that the enamel has chipped off a lot of the plane body. What do you prefer to do if you decide to remove the old enamel? Re-enamel, paint, powder coat?

Thank you for all the help you have already provided!

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1063 posts in 1456 days


#7 posted 03-18-2016 11:39 AM

I use this, Alox, on all bare steel and cast iron in the shop, except areas that need to be slick, like a plane sole ot saw top, there just use furniture paste wax. As for repairing/replacing japanning on planes, unless you are concerned about historical correctness just black semi-gloss enamel in a rattle can. Not sure about wood in evaporust – it can be applied with a rag or paper towel wet with it and wrapped around the tool, so that may be the best approach.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#8 posted 03-18-2016 12:05 PM

Jotoba and Camella oil are used by many people for oiling planes between uses.

For the brace I believe a bench grinder with a wire brush or flap wheel will clean it up quite well.

I generally try working with it by hand first just to see how far I can get. Only very few times will I need to resort to Evapo rust or electrolysis. The little sanding disks that go on a drill or die grinder along with a little PB Blaster or similar work quite well. Follow up with sandpaper in increasing grits.

I also have a little media blaster which is really good for the frog and inside the sole casting.

Engine spray paint will simulate the jappanning quite well. I use gloss and apply 5-6 coats. Make sure you’ve cleaned it well to remove any oil residues and rinse with a solvent.

There’s lots of ways to do it. Good Luck hope this helps.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2442 days


#9 posted 03-18-2016 12:24 PM

I use the Camellia oil for hand tools. I just spray a little on piece of an old white t-shirt and wipe them down. I really don’t know if that is the best option but for what the oil costs, I’m going to use it!

For bigger cast iron tops, I use Boeshield T9 and/or Johnson’s paste wax.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#10 posted 03-18-2016 12:25 PM

I use fluid film.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2385 posts in 744 days


#11 posted 03-18-2016 02:48 PM

There seems to be little effect to wood in New evap-o-rust otherthen the wood gets wet. You can reuse evao-o-rust over and over again. When it becomes black it makes a nice gray stain on new wood. :-].

Last time I bought evap-o-rust. I bought a 5 galleon drum with free shipping to the True Value Hardware store. This I think is the about the cheapest way to get it. Well you could buy a 55 galleon drum from “the rust store”, but thats a lot of evap-o-rust to have.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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TuffO

15 posts in 678 days


#12 posted 03-20-2016 01:17 AM

Is there anything wrong with using white vinegar instead of Evapo-Rust? Would this affect etchings? I use it all the time for cleaning axe heads is there any detriment for planes or saw plates?

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2385 posts in 744 days


#13 posted 03-20-2016 02:06 AM

you can use white vinegar you can also use molasses but it is slower. I don’t know how it will effect an etch. Brit and Summerfi are the masters at saw restoration. Check out the Saws, using collecting, cleaning and buying forum and ask your questions there.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 293 days


#14 posted 04-18-2016 05:20 PM

Sounds like you are doing everything right. It takes a long time to get stuff right but once it’s right you’ll be amazed at how well things work for you!

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

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