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Thin Strip Jig Experiment #2

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Forum topic by Tony_912 posted 03-16-2016 05:09 PM 650 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tony_912

32 posts in 269 days


03-16-2016 05:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig oak tablesaw

Created this thin strip jig for table saw

Details in this video


14 replies so far

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#1 posted 03-16-2016 07:17 PM

My Incra LS-III cuts 1/32” strips all day …

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#2 posted 03-16-2016 07:34 PM

My Incra LS-III cuts 1/32” strips all day …

LOL – yeah, that’s the ticket – for about 250 times the money ;-)
And kind of a PITA if you want to use it on multiple machines though (if even possible).

I like the design. I made one a long time ago that I use frequently on my table saws as well as my band saw (and even my disc sander), particularly for ripping stuff to be used as inlays. But mine was more of a quick-n-cheap version using scrap wood and an old bearing – however, it can also be used for a lot of other things besides a thin rip:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Tony_912

32 posts in 269 days


#3 posted 03-16-2016 08:53 PM



My Incra LS-III cuts 1/32” strips all day …

M

- MadMark


Nice tool. but it seems to be attachment to inca fence. Also it has 1/32” presision and this one has 1/64”. Also the dial for 1” is exactly 1” on inca LS-III and on my thin strip jig it is 4”. Basically it is much easier to read.

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Tony_912

32 posts in 269 days


#4 posted 03-16-2016 08:54 PM


My Incra LS-III cuts 1/32” strips all day …

LOL – yeah, that s the ticket – for about 250 times the money ;-)
And kind of a PITA if you want to use it on multiple machines though (if even possible).

I like the design. I made one a long time ago that I use frequently on my table saws as well as my band saw (and even my disc sander), particularly for ripping stuff to be used as inlays. But mine was more of a quick-n-cheap version using scrap wood and an old bearing – however, it can also be used for a lot of other things besides a thin rip:

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


Very nice and practical design. I like the way yo drill holes to stop the board from splitting.

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2442 days


#5 posted 03-16-2016 09:23 PM

Cool design!

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#6 posted 03-16-2016 09:58 PM

Tony,

You’ve never used one.

The red knob partially visible at left is the .001” per click adjuster.

The cutoff is not trapped by the incra and cannot kick back when used with a ZCI.

Yes, you have to move the fence after each cut, but you get perfect glue ready slices at any desired dimension. Oh yeah, it brings this repeatability to my table router too.

No, its not cheap, but if your work needs repeatability the incra is the only tool to use. Even their marking scales will up your workmanship.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#7 posted 03-17-2016 12:52 AM

I just don’t get thin strip jigs. Why not just use your fence? That’s what it’s for. ...... and it’s free.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#8 posted 03-17-2016 01:00 AM

I just don’t get thin strip jigs. Why not just use your fence? That’s what it’s for. ...... and it’s free.

Because cutting a thin strip between the fence and blade isn’t exactly fun (or particularly safe).

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You can usually make one for free, and they can be used for lots of other useful functions as well :)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#9 posted 03-17-2016 03:00 AM

I find it just fine. The blade is buried in the shoe and not exposed at all.
We will have to agree to disagree. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#10 posted 03-17-2016 03:25 AM

... or … you could keep the big side of the stock against the fence and just shave a strip. Much safer that way, no trapped cut, no kickback. Just move the fence 1/8” to give a 1/32” cutoff from my 3/32” thin kerf blade. Repeat for as many slices as you need. Oh, you can’t index the fence by precise steps? Guess you’ll continue to do it the dangerous way with trapped cuts and the random shop block.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#11 posted 03-17-2016 03:36 AM

... or … you could keep the big side of the stock against the fence and just shave a strip. [...] Oh, you can’t index the fence by precise steps? Guess you’ll continue to do it the dangerous way with trapped cuts and the random shop block.

Or use the jig being discussed, which is what it does. Exact same width every time, and you don’t have to go out and spend hundreds of dollars for it :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#12 posted 03-17-2016 04:10 AM

Or just keep doing it safely and accurately as I hvpave done for the last forty years.
I thought we were going to agree to disagree …..

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#13 posted 03-17-2016 04:21 AM

Or just keep doing it safely and accurately as I hvpave done for the last forty years.
I thought we were going to agree to disagree …..
- shipwright

I agree :)

What this really demonstrates though, is that there are several different ways to accomplish the task, and in the end, it’s whatever you feel most comfortable with!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Tony_912's profile

Tony_912

32 posts in 269 days


#14 posted 03-17-2016 05:07 AM



... or … you could keep the big side of the stock against the fence and just shave a strip. Much safer that way, no trapped cut, no kickback. Just move the fence 1/8” to give a 1/32” cutoff from my 3/32” thin kerf blade. Repeat for as many slices as you need. Oh, you can t index the fence by precise steps? Guess you ll continue to do it the dangerous way with trapped cuts and the random shop block.

M

- MadMark


I had to do better introduction. I like the inca fence, nice tools. But I am more interested in making things. I started my youtube channel to explore the woodworking hobby and share what I learned. I can afford to buy a new table saw and all the inca accessories but that is not my path. I have much fun buying old contractors saw and spending hundreds of dollars to fix it. The best part is that I had great time restoring that saw. Woodworking
is not a cheap hobby but I started it for just fun. It is something I do when want to relax and spend some quality time. As for this jig I love it because it is unique, I used transversal scale in its design. That scale was abandoned around 18th century, since everyone switched to vernier scale. The reason I love transversial is that you can make it readable. As I mentioned before, to read 1” measurement I read 4” dial and if you like it can be 10” or 1 foot. I am kind of tired reading those tiny numbers or vernier scales on instruments.

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