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Ridge Carbide Table Saw Blades

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Forum topic by jay443 posted 03-16-2016 05:08 PM 442 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jay443

10 posts in 265 days


03-16-2016 05:08 PM

I’ve been looking at the Ridge Carbide blades for my table saw, and I discovered that they also have an “industrial” line that’s made in Germany. Does anyone have experience with those? They are quite a bit less than the premium blades. Just wondering about quality compared to Freud Industrial and others in that price range. Thanks.


7 replies so far

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2838 days


#1 posted 03-16-2016 06:30 PM

The TS2000 is right up there with the WWII, Super General, Gold Medal, et al, but I’ve never tried their blades from Germany. They might be fine….probably are, but are an unknown. Since there are so many well proven good choices from Infinity, Freud Industrial, CMT Industrial, and others, I don’t see a reason to be the guinnea pig.

What saw do you have?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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chiseler

121 posts in 351 days


#2 posted 03-16-2016 07:06 PM

I have both a Ridge 40T,and the Forest WWII,the results are identical except the Ridge was cheaper.There was a comparison done by FWW a number of years ago(I don’t remember what issue),and Ridge ran neck and neck with the Forest.I happen to know their dados are just as good also.I will continue to buy the Ridge carbide blades over the Forest for this reason.it is my understanding , they both use the same grade carbide,and that’s what separates a long lasting blade from the rest.I used my Forest daily for 8 yrs. before its first sharpening (and boy was it dull Lol) But on a serious note:you can’t go wrong with a Ridge carbide blade.

I hope this helps

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

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jay443

10 posts in 265 days


#3 posted 03-16-2016 07:42 PM

Thanks for the tips. I just bought my first table saw, a Ridgid TS2424 I found on Craigslist for $200. It was in perfect condition so I jumped on the deal. It’s no 3hp cabinet saw, but I think it will be respectable for a hobbyist. I got it all cleaned and aligned, bought a ZC insert, and am now trying to find a good blade. Of course I’ve seen the Forrest and Ridge premium blades. Was just wondering if I wanted to buy a blade that’s worth half my saw’s value!

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2838 days


#4 posted 03-16-2016 08:48 PM

If you want top performance for your new saw, I’d go with a good 60T or 80T crosscut blade, and a decent 24T rip blade instead. The best analogy I can use is to compare the general purpose blade to an all season radial tire. General purpose blades are good at just about everything, but excel at none, so I don’t generally advocate spending big bucks for what’s an intended compromise by design. A great 40T general purpose blade won’t crosscut as cleanly as a good task specific 60T to 80T crosscut blade, and won’t rip nearly as efficiently as a decent 24T bulk rip blade. You can always pick up a $30 Freud Diablo or Irwin Marples general purpose blade down the road if you feel a need….those blades can come surprisingly close to a TS2000 or WWII for much less, and are more cost appropriate for your saw IMO.

This 80T Oldham Pro blade is $20 plus s/h, and will give super fine crosscuts as well as excellent plywood/sheetgood cuts. Made in the USA. Forget the name, buy the blade (not all Oldham blades are this good). The Freud Diablo 60T D1060X for $39, or the comparable Irwin Marples would also be a good choice for a crosscut blade (don’t confuse the Marples line with the Irwin Marathon line….again, buy the blade, not the brand)

Add a decent 24T thin kerf rip blade like the Diablo or Marples for $27-$30, and you’ll have a lot your of cutting needs covered quite well. That should even leave funds a decent 40T or 50T general purpose combo blade if you still want to pick one up.

Tips For Picking Saw Blades

My list of bargain blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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jay443

10 posts in 265 days


#5 posted 03-16-2016 10:09 PM

Awesome, thanks. What do you think about running a full kerf blade? Reason I ask is because a friend gave me a free MJ splitter kit, full kerf. Thought it would be nice to use.

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2838 days


#6 posted 03-16-2016 10:17 PM

Full kerf is 33% wider than their 3/32” thin kerf counterpart. If you won’t be pushing your saw hard, full kerf will be fine, but when the going gets tough the TK is simply easier to spin.

If you pursue full kerf, one of the better bargains on the market is the full kerf Delta 35-7657 40T? general purpose blade. C4 micrograin carbide, made in the USA, high grade steel and precision manufacturing, and gives everyone of the premium $100 an impressive run for the money. It still won’t offer the performance of good task specific blades, but it’s hard to argue with the value vs $100+.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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chiseler

121 posts in 351 days


#7 posted 03-16-2016 11:15 PM

In my experience,a full kerf blade on a smaller TS will eventually blow out the bearings.It has nothing to do with how hard you push the saw(even though I’d think twice about 12/4 maple or oak).It’s that initial jerk when you first hit the switch.I know this from experience,I’ve burned out at least 3 jobsite saws that way.IMHO,stick with the thin kerf blades.

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

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