LumberJocks

BeadLock loose tenon joinery

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by oscorner posted 02-08-2007 12:26 PM 9707 views 1 time favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3056 days


02-08-2007 12:26 PM

I am currently making a table for my son and cut my first tenon and mortise joinery. Well I guess I did a fair job with my chisels, but there was a lot to be desired. Sorry, you won’t see any pictures of my mistakes, but I’ll post the finished table another time. Well, I purchased the,”beadLock” loose tenon joinery system months ago and desided that, now was the time to try it. Here’s the link: http://www.beadlock.com/. The site does a better job than I can at showing the proceedure and it’s applications. It is a very simple way to join two pieces of wood with a tenon. Secure clamping of the jig to the pieces is a must, because if the jig moves the beadLock tenon stock will not fit because of the shape of the tenon stock. It is shaped to correspond to the drilled tenon. It takes minutes to do, compared to the hour or more that I spent chiseling through the 1 1/4 oak at 3/4” wide. BeadLock makes both 3/8” and 1/2” tenon stock and the guide set has jigs for drilling both with very good instructions. You can also buy a router bit to make your own beadLock style tenon stock so you can make it out of different wood types. Now, I didn’t use it for through tenons, but i imagine that it can be. The shape of the beadLock stock could add a very interesting decrative look to through tenons, also. I think you owe it to yourselves to look into this type of joinery as one you may find useful in you own projects.

-- Jesus is Lord!


25 replies so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#1 posted 02-09-2007 04:24 AM

I’ve used beadlock for years. I even had my own blades made up to cut the stock, because buying the beadlock tenon were expensive. They now make routerbits to cut the stock so I’ve upgraded to them. They do a great job.

I think you will be happy with them.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2906 days


#2 posted 02-13-2007 03:14 AM

I liked what I read about the beadlock before, but have not used them. I have thought of investing in their bits to make my own tennons, and may consider that again. It would definitely save time if I just needed to drill holes instead of shaping a mortise.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3072 days


#3 posted 02-13-2007 03:35 AM

Hmmm…. I wonder if they (the Beadlock folks) will take advantage of marketing themselves as a considerably cheaper alternative to the Festool domino.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Don Mitchell's profile

Don Mitchell

40 posts in 2881 days


#4 posted 02-13-2007 04:23 AM

I’ve used the system on several projects and have been real happy with. I was considering buying their router bits to make the tenon stock. Until I got caught short one weekend without any of the tenon stock and being too lazy to go to town and buy what I needed I simply paired the sides of the mortise flush and made “dominoe’s” to fit the mortises!

-- Don

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3056 days


#5 posted 02-13-2007 04:41 PM

Don, I never thought of doing that! I could actually use my beadLock jig to make 3/8 or 1/2 inch wide mortises, since I don’t have a mortising maching, yet. :^)

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Don Mitchell's profile

Don Mitchell

40 posts in 2881 days


#6 posted 02-14-2007 01:51 AM

You sure can! And with shiims between the jig and the work piece you can make them as wide as you need. Great part about is, you still have well over $600 that you saved by not buying the festoon…...I mean festool!

-- Don

View Shawn's profile

Shawn

225 posts in 2898 days


#7 posted 02-14-2007 02:50 AM

Birthday is in May, I’m gonna ask for one…great post

-- Cheers

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#8 posted 02-14-2007 03:50 AM

If you make your own Tenons. It’s best to make them about a foot long because it’s easier to work it through the router table.

Also don’t reverse the top and bottom when doing the other side of the tenon stock, because you may not be exactly equal, so keep the bottom on the table when doing both sides.

I happened across some 1 3/8” beech in my wood stash so I made a couple of hundred feet of stock from beech. Man is it hard wood. I think that what the stock is that you buy from beadlock.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#9 posted 02-14-2007 03:51 AM

Shawn Request the router bits also for the birthday.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2736 days


#10 posted 07-21-2007 08:12 AM

Os… Have you used the Beadlock on anyother projects? I am very interested in using it to build my self a desk.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3056 days


#11 posted 07-22-2007 02:16 AM

Yes, I did use it on my Thorsen Table, too. I found that regular 3/8” dowels where a lot easier to use and line up using my SuperShop horizontal drill than the BeadLock. Also, there have been a few articles lately showing the strength of Morse and tenon, BeadLock, dowels and biscuits and I was surprised to learn that the dowels where stronger than the Beadlock tenon. I would have never guessed. I thought it would be stronger since it is almost the same size as a tenon would be. If you can make a jig that will align the BeadLock jig perfectly, then you should enjoy using it on your desk, otherwise good luck. On my Thorsen Table I had to cut my aprons because the BeadLock alignment was off, even after following the instructions and being very careful that the line was lined up in the alignment hole.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#12 posted 07-22-2007 05:07 AM

OK Mark and Chris.

I did a test of the Beadlock system that I have. I’ve had the same problem that mark has stated. Here are two pictures.

On this one I scribed a line on the wood and lined up the jig to the line the best that I could. I drilled the holes and inserted the beadlock tenon. If you notice the lines are not matching. It maybe 1/32 to 1/64 of an inch off.

Here is another picture.

This one is perfect. What I did was use a marking knife to scribe the lines. I then rubbed a pencil over the scribed lines to make them visible (Only done because of the picture. Not needed to drill the Beadlock .)

I then placed the jig on the board, put the tip of the marking knife in the mark line I scribed, and then slid the jig up to the marking knife. Tightened it down and drilled the holes. I did that on both boards. I inserted the beadlock tenon. The lines match up perfectly.

I think the problem is getting the jig to align with the necessary lines. I’ll use the marking knife from now on, when I’m using the Beadlock jig. If you buy it get the router bits to make your own stock. It makes it a lot cheaper.

PS The boards were not the same length so don’t look at the ends to see if they match up.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14426 posts in 2811 days


#13 posted 07-23-2007 08:26 AM

Thanks for starting this thread Mark. I’ve had the beadlock system for about a year now, but have not actually use it. You’ve given me the push I needed. I’m really anxious to try my had at one of the Morris chairs – wonder if the
Beadlock would make a strong enough joint for the chair? Any thoughts? Anybody got a good set of plans for a Morris Chair?

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3056 days


#14 posted 07-23-2007 04:49 PM

I believe it is strong enough, as long as you don’t skimp on the length of the tenon and you match the correct thickness for the wood that you are using. I’m sorry, but I don’t have any plans for a Morris Chair.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2906 days


#15 posted 07-23-2007 05:03 PM

I wonder how the Beadlock would compare to the DowelMax in terms of ease of use, accuracy, etc. Maybe Mot has compared the two?

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

showing 1 through 15 of 25 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase