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Forum topic by BB1 posted 03-15-2016 12:08 PM 612 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

475 posts in 308 days


03-15-2016 12:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource

Looking for suggestions on “how to” books and dvds on woodturning. Have used youtube but don’t have an unlimited data plan so am looking for additional opportunities to learn about the tools and techniques.


14 replies so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3559 days


#1 posted 03-15-2016 12:33 PM

Brian Havens is a great wood turner and he puts out some excellent information on YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/user/BHavensWoodworker

He is a great combination of both artistic and technical. He is able to take the “Why” and break it down so you have a good base knowledge of what you are doing at the lathe.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1881 posts in 1594 days


#2 posted 03-15-2016 04:36 PM

Here is a free book online you can add to your favorite or save some place and check as often as need or want too.

http://www.wood.woodtools.nov.ru/books/lathe_book/lathe_book.pdf

Other than that recommend going to local library and see what they have on hand.

This site has a lot of information if want to check it out. There are so many other sites online that are very helpful too!

http://www.woodturningonline.com/Turning/Turning_projects.php

-- Bill

View sepeck's profile

sepeck

314 posts in 1601 days


#3 posted 03-15-2016 05:07 PM

Captain Eddie.
https://www.youtube.com/user/capneddie

http://www.turningforprofit.com/
I will say that I have learned a few interesting things from that site.

out of print/out of copyright books are interesting to look through.
http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/woodworking/Turning-Cutting-Spinning/
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15460

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

View bigJohninvegas's profile (online now)

bigJohninvegas

207 posts in 921 days


#4 posted 03-15-2016 05:30 PM

There are alot of books out there. What are you wanting to turn?
I have picked up a few books, but they are specific projects.
Most of what I have is on segmented turning.
The best one I have so far is woodturning with Ray Allen.
Has plans in the back of the book on how to make several detail rings.
I have a several other books. One on small toys, but overall I have not been impressed enough with my other book choices to recommend them to you.
Half a dozen segmented books. If I only I had foumd the Ray Allen book 1st.
I have taken classes with Jimmy Clewes. No books that I know of, but he has a members web site with alot of really cool tips and projects. Also DVDs.
Good luck.

-- John

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 761 days


#5 posted 03-15-2016 10:46 PM

Just based on my learning curve I suggest videos over books (I do have both).
A check on Amazon should show both books and videos by Richard Raffan and by Keith Rowley. Both give a good start into both spindle and face work turning. You can probably pick them up used for <15.00

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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BB1

475 posts in 308 days


#6 posted 03-15-2016 10:54 PM

Thank you so much for the links and suggestions. Have already starting checking them out (and downloaded one book). We have a couple of books from our local library and have been checking out YouTube enough to get started. For general woodworking, we purchased some WoodSmith Shop dvds and the information was very helpful in learning how to set up the table saw, create jigs, etc (as I knew little beyond my use of a jig saw and miter saw to do some laminate flooring). Was hoping there might be a series of a similar nature for woodturning.

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

315 posts in 2495 days


#7 posted 03-16-2016 12:54 AM

When I got into woodturning, I found some books and videos and started putting what I learned into practice. It wasn’t long before I ran into examples to prove the adage, “there are 1000 ways to do it”. Not sure how accurate that really is, but it sure seems that way. Keep this in mind as you’re learning; each turner/teacher has their own ways of doing things. I’ll quote Bruce Lee, “Adapt what is useful, reject what is useless, and add what is specifically your own.” Make sure you know the basics before doing too much of the latter.

Based on this, my advice is to try to focus on the key differences, and see how each turner/teacher approaches the fundamentals. By fundamentals, I’d include the following list:

1) safety. You’ll see videos with turners not wearing protective gear, mostly because it’s hard to talk to the camera with a face shield. But you’re still responsible for safety. The primary concerns are not getting caught up in the spinning work, and not having all or part of the workpiece come at you (including breathing dust). You won’t progress as a woodturner if you’re injured (or worse). Good technique is a big part of safety, as well.

2) Grain orientation. Every time you make a cut, (and every time you watch someone do it in a video) know the grain orientation. If you’re turning in spindle mode, know which way is downhill and how to deal with end grain. If you’re turning with side grain orientation (bowls), then know that it’s not the same. There will be “rules” for different types of grain that violating will either be messy or dangerous, depending on the circumstance. Brian Haven’s videos (on YT, as mentioned above) go a long way to discussing this.

3) Know the difference between a bevel supported cut vs. a scraping cut. Every time you present the tool to the wood (and every time you watch someone do it in a video), know which one it is. Again, there are “rules” for these that can be either messy or dangerous. Lyle Jamieson has some free articles on his website that cover this. Another vote for Brian Haven’s videos.

4) Learn how to sharpen your tools. It’s a skill, like woodturning itself, and one that you will need to do every time you turn. Turning with dull tools is no fun and also dangerous.

5) Learn different ways to securely mount your work pieces. Most people go directly to either turning between centers and/or mounting in a 4 jaw chuck. Sometimes that’s the best way, and sometimes it isn’t. Knowing other ways of mounting the work will help your creativity and skills, IMHO.

The above list isn’t to tell you all you need to know. But as you’re accessing these resources, these are some things you’ll want to keep in mind, to hopefully enhance the quality (and rate) of your learning.

Check out your local library. I have read several books that I got there (no charge). The “Getting Started in Woodturning” has some good articles, for example.

My last suggestion is to start with spindle turning, with the workpiece between centers. I personally think it’s easier to think about the grain orientation and the type of cut. Plus I think it’s generally safer to have the workpiece between centers. And the type of catches you’ll get in spindle mode aren’t USUALLY as dramatic (dangerous) as when you get a catch on a bowl mounted in a chuck.

Happy turning. It’s a wonderful hobby and a wonderful way to spend your time!

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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BB1

475 posts in 308 days


#8 posted 03-16-2016 01:03 AM

Barry – thank you for your list of fundamentals. My husband has already watched a couple of the Brian Haven videos as suggested by Todd Clippinger and he found them very helpful. I have a list of names to check from the other LJ replies. Lot’s more to watch and learn. Understanding the techniques is key to safety with anything in the shop and your points are appreciated!

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

736 posts in 2046 days


#9 posted 03-16-2016 01:26 AM

Look for a woodturning club. The woodworking club I belong to has hands on teaching sessions from excellent turners. I have learned a lot in the last six months and still learning. Practice and more practice will be the best learning tool.

View BB1's profile (online now)

BB1

475 posts in 308 days


#10 posted 03-16-2016 12:57 PM

Used the name suggestions and have few dvds and a book ordered from amazon. Thanks to all who gave us insights. Considered this one but didn’t order yet…is this one to add : Doc Green
Fixtures and Chucks for Woodturning: Everything You Need to Know to Secure Wood on Your Lathe

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

315 posts in 2495 days


#11 posted 03-16-2016 01:07 PM

I keep looking at that book but haven’t ordered it yet. It appears to be comprehensive, although some of what it contains is available from other sources. I might get it someday after I exhaust all the other ideas.

Mostly, though, I’ve made the decision to limit the number of physical books I buy because of space issues. If it were available in e-book form, I’d probably already have it.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2992 days


#12 posted 03-16-2016 01:13 PM

Lots of good info here

http://nealaddy.org/node/7

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3559 days


#13 posted 03-16-2016 02:08 PM

BB1 – Looks like you are getting some great resources. Good Luck on your woodturning journey!

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 761 days


#14 posted 03-16-2016 02:36 PM



is this one to add : Doc Green
Fixtures and Chucks for Woodturning: Everything You Need to Know to Secure Wood on Your Lathe
- BB1

I haven’t read/see the one from Doc Green.
If you have the data available on your plan this link is to a very inclusive video on almost every holding/chucking method; about 1.5 hours.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUXil-5dEeo

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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