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Forum topic by JosephNY posted 03-14-2016 05:41 PM 1035 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


03-14-2016 05:41 PM

Boy oh boy am I pitiful!

I dabbled a tiny bit for a while making a table here and there, etc. but I really know just a hair over nothing.

But I really want to woodwork.

So I went out and bought thousands of board feet of air-dried hardwood, found some space and set up a large worktable w/bench holes and made my workshop with the following:

Dewalt 7480 table saw
Jet 22-44 drum sander
10×36 HF lathe
10” drill press
double sided grinder
air compressor
Nice little bandsaw
Router
Mig welder (no, not for the wood (;-)
Overhead lights, shopvac and hoses, lots of cool clamps, tons of power and manual handtools, etc.

I decided today would be the day I’d actually do a little project: An end grain cutting board.

Well, I messed up every single step of the way.

First I took a live edge cherry board and wanted to cut it down into strips. That’s when I realized I don’t know how to make such a straight cut.

So I tried to just push the wood through the table saw straight. No surprise to you, I suspect, but that failed.

So I grabbed a piece of spalted maple and tried the same thing. No luck.

So I tried to get it flat with the drum sander. Not so good.

So I used my router jig to make it into a planer. Failed.

Mind you, I’m a middle aged guy who has been working with my hands all my life. I’m otherwise considered skilled.

But not today. Not working with wood.

Anyone have any suggestions?

Is a planer a must have?

BTW, I’ve read hundreds of posts here, watched dozens of youtube videos, read all sorts of tutorials and project instructions, so it’s not like I went in blind.

Thanks very much!


20 replies so far

View TMGStudioFurniture's profile

TMGStudioFurniture

55 posts in 281 days


#1 posted 03-14-2016 05:50 PM

My semi-obnoxious saying is that ‘it is a lot easier to buy a set of tools than build a set of skills’.

In other words, focus on building skills first, then buy tools as needed.

I’d start out building an edge grain cutting board, as the pieces will be bigger. As a decent cook, I don’t see the excitement over end grain anyway – I’ve got a 12 year old edge grain cutting board that still looks great.

I’ve never made a cutting board, but there must be loads of videos on youtube on how to make one. Focus on the knowledge/skills first.

Make test cuts with MDF or some other cheap wood. Don’t make good hardwood into scrap.

Try learning how to use/master one tool at a time, there’s no reason to be switching between so many tools if you don’t know how to use any of them.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TMGStudioFurniture

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patron

13535 posts in 2803 days


#2 posted 03-14-2016 06:05 PM

to straighten a wonky edge
attach a straight board to the edge one side
(nails or screws)
and holding that edge against the fence
(table saw or band saw)
cut the other side of the board

then remove straight edge
and spin board around
and rip as needed

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 402 days


#3 posted 03-14-2016 06:21 PM

Joe maybe just take the day off and start over tomorrow. We all have bad days and today could be yours. Working when things aren’t going well is a recipe for something bad to happen. Don’t force it. Tomorrow is another day and maybe you’ll get some mojo back.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#4 posted 03-14-2016 06:31 PM

End grain cutting boards are not easy, I do not think they make a good beginner project. I would really try to make a couple of edge grain boards first. Yes, a planer is going to be an asset but you should master the tools you have first. You need to learn how joint an edge before you feed it into the table saw. It can be done as patron suggests or w/ a handplane or with a joiner or various shop made work arounds. Reading and you tube are going to be your friends. Start out slow and build confidence as you go.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


#5 posted 03-14-2016 09:22 PM

Not obnoxious at all—you’re right, it’s good advice, and I believe you meant it to be helpful. So thank you!

From what I read online, end grain is easier on the knife. But there’s opinions on both sides. I just thought it was cool and I thought I could do it.

I definitely need to learn how to use these tools.

I actually spent several hours with a hand plane, just for the fun of doing it.


My semi-obnoxious saying is that it is a lot easier to buy a set of tools than build a set of skills .

In other words, focus on building skills first, then buy tools as needed.

I d start out building an edge grain cutting board, as the pieces will be bigger. As a decent cook, I don t see the excitement over end grain anyway – I ve got a 12 year old edge grain cutting board that still looks great.

I ve never made a cutting board, but there must be loads of videos on youtube on how to make one. Focus on the knowledge/skills first.

Make test cuts with MDF or some other cheap wood. Don t make good hardwood into scrap.

Try learning how to use/master one tool at a time, there s no reason to be switching between so many tools if you don t know how to use any of them.

- TMGStudioFurniture


View JosephNY's profile

JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


#6 posted 03-14-2016 09:25 PM

Use an MDF board’s factory edge against the fence?

I’ve been looking at table saw jointer jigs that use a flat piece on the table saw top with a small piece glued on the bottom to ride in the table track (I know there’s a better name, but I don’t know it), and another narrower piece on top with clamps mounted on it to hold the work piece in place. Is this the idea?

Thank you!


to straighten a wonky edge
attach a straight board to the edge one side
(nails or screws)
and holding that edge against the fence
(table saw or band saw)
cut the other side of the board

then remove straight edge
and spin board around
and rip as needed

- patron


View JosephNY's profile

JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


#7 posted 03-14-2016 09:26 PM

That’s great advice. I was there from 8am to 1pm today and knew there was nothing productive that would come from sticking around.

BTW, my shopis in Brooklyn.


Joe maybe just take the day off and start over tomorrow. We all have bad days and today could be yours. Working when things aren t going well is a recipe for something bad to happen. Don t force it. Tomorrow is another day and maybe you ll get some mojo back.

- builtinbkyn


View JosephNY's profile

JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


#8 posted 03-14-2016 09:30 PM

Aha! I’m very glad to hear it.

I think I need to make a table saw jointer jig.

But I think you’ve hit on a big problem for me: I don’t know what order in which to do things.

If I’m starting with rough cut, live edge wood, I don’t know if I sand, plane, table saw, joint or cry as a first step.

Thank you.


End grain cutting boards are not easy, I do not think they make a good beginner project. I would really try to make a couple of edge grain boards first. Yes, a planer is going to be an asset but you should master the tools you have first. You need to learn how joint an edge before you feed it into the table saw. It can be done as patron suggests or w/ a handplane or with a joiner or various shop made work arounds. Reading and you tube are going to be your friends. Start out slow and build confidence as you go.

- bondogaposis


View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#9 posted 03-14-2016 10:33 PM

With rough wood, you start with a jointer, or a hand plane to get it flat on one face. (You’ll need a lot of practice if you decide on the hand plane route)

Next step is to run it through a planer to get two parallel, clean faces.

Step 3 is back to the jointer to get a straight edge.

Then you can cut to width on the table saw.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View JosephNY's profile

JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


#10 posted 03-14-2016 11:07 PM

That’s a great help!

Can I use a planer sled for jointing (adjustable supports under work piece to keep non-flatness as it rides through planer)?

Sounds like I need a Dewalt 735x

Thank you


With rough wood, you start with a jointer, or a hand plane to get it flat on one face. (You ll need a lot of practice if you decide on the hand plane route)

Next step is to run it through a planer to get two parallel, clean faces.

Step 3 is back to the jointer to get a straight edge.

Then you can cut to width on the table saw.

- Ger21


View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 402 days


#11 posted 03-14-2016 11:30 PM

Hey Joe I’m in Brooklyn too. If you want to come by and run some boards thru the J&P send me a PM and we’ll try to work something out that fits both our schedules. The shop is in Williamsburg.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View pumperdude's profile

pumperdude

24 posts in 1480 days


#12 posted 03-15-2016 01:28 AM

Buy a jointer. It is where the action begins. Start out straight, end straight.

View TMGStudioFurniture's profile

TMGStudioFurniture

55 posts in 281 days


#13 posted 03-15-2016 03:34 AM

I think you’d be best off to start with dimensioned wood, that will simplify the process. I think Rockler or Woodcraft sells a cutting board kit of wood – it’s probably ‘overpriced’ relative to the market, but it might be a good place to start anyway.

I also have quite a few books, buy some and start reading. They all discuss how to handle rough lumber, and overall tool use, etc.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TMGStudioFurniture

View JosephNY's profile

JosephNY

31 posts in 1629 days


#14 posted 03-15-2016 12:52 PM

I already have quite a lot of hardwood, so maybe I’ll get lucky and not waste too much (more).

I ordered a planer (CUTECH 40200H-CT) and Jointer (CUTECH 40160H-CT) last night.

That should sink me nicely further the curve of capability.

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#15 posted 03-15-2016 02:44 PM

A benchtop jointer is not very useful except for short pieces of wood (~2 ft) For longer boards, you’ll want longer tables.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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