LumberJocks

Miterd Corners For Box

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Maveric777 posted 1608 days ago 970 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1677 days


1608 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hey everyone, I was looking to get some advice as for the best way to get crisp mitered corners. I’m about to attempt a couple of keepsake boxes and possible urn in the near future. Just trying to avoid some “Trial and Error” efforts on my part…lol

I have a miter saw, but fear the tear out I get at the end of the cut. I have tried the tape technique with better but not perfect results. I am thinking about building a 45 deg angle miter slide for my table saw. Basically I was going to put a fence on it with a stop (to make exact matching cuts). My thought process is I can use it like a normal miter sled but incorporate a 45 instead of a 90. I’m thinking that could be a good way to duplicate cuts and greatly reduce tear out. Would this work?

If you have any examples or ideas I would love to hear them. Thanks for any input and help….

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.


10 replies so far

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1675 days


#1 posted 1608 days ago

I think the best strategy is a miter slide jig that has a 90% angle and cuts through the blade at a 45% angle into the corner. If your 90% measurement is dead on, it is okay if the 45% alignment is off by a hair. Cut one piece of wood from each side of the jig. They will be a perfect match.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1677 days


#2 posted 1608 days ago

Ohhh so are you saying make a big “V” type jig for the slide? So each corner is cut off the same 90? If I understand you correctly…

That makes perfect sense to me. I’m thinking I could build a normal slide with a stop so I can get duplicate cuts. Then add my “V” jig and cut the corners on both side. I would have to take into account the smidgen I would loose cutting the mitered corner, but that is very do-able…..

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View alanealane's profile

alanealane

365 posts in 2491 days


#3 posted 1608 days ago

If your jig works for you, great. But I can’t rave about Freud’s saw blades enough!! Their product called the Sliding Compound Miter blade is fantastic!! I use it on my Radial Arm Saw and its -5 degree negative tooth hook shear cuts the wood and leaves a glass-smooth finish. I recently cut some miters for edge trimming a desk top. They came out nearly perfect. The little fuzz that existed at the end of the cut was easily brushed away with my fingers only. It should take no more than some 400 grit sandpaper and a feather-light touch applied to the fuzz and it will be gone. No splintering, no tearing. Just as long as you don’t feed the blade through the wood too fast (which is true of all blades), then the cut will come out beautifully. Click on the picture below for more info…

If you use your miter saw, set up some sort of cutoff system where you can rest the wood against a stop and cut each piece identically. If you don’t feel like setting up stops, then be very careful with your measurements, cut slightly over-sized, test-fit the pieces, and trim them until they make perfectly tight and square miters.

I hope everything works out well for you.

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View Fireguy's profile

Fireguy

132 posts in 1836 days


#4 posted 1608 days ago

I just put a sacrificial fence on my miter gauge and lay the blade over at 45deg. Make some test cuts on scrap and lay the 45’s together to make a 90 and lay them on the saw table to check the gap, fine tune the angle and you get nice joints with out a lot of trouble. The sacrificial fence will keep you from getting tear out.

-- Alex

View bayspt's profile

bayspt

292 posts in 2305 days


#5 posted 1608 days ago

Click for details
Third picture is a jig like Rich is talking about. I made mine with an adjustable stop on the one side. Process is to 45 on the right then trim to final length on the left. as long as the fron is a perfect 90* you will get 90 with any 2 pieces cut.

-- Jimmy, Oklahoma "It's a dog-eat-dog world, and I'm wearing milkbone underwear!"

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1677 days


#6 posted 1608 days ago

Thanks for all the info everyone. I been looking at those Freud blades for a while now. My only real issue with that set up I haven’t made my miter saw stand with the arms built yet (I plan making one with the T-Tracks down the arms for stops…yet another “Thing To Do”...lol) So I am worried about making solid stops to duplicate cuts. I honestly don’t trust myself enough to make duplicate measured cut…. and be exact.

Now the slide idea sounds like it may be the right direction (thanks Jimmy for showing me an example). My question is how could I make that cut with a 4 to 5 inch board? I have read up and see how cutting the angles on both sides of the jig makes a perfect 90 even if it is a smidgen off. With this setup i would have to lay the board on its side to get a 45 all the way down the thickness. .... Sorry I’m just thinking out loud here…lol

I am wondering if I could incinerate the same theory as the jig, but make a jig where it cuts down the width with a cut? ..... Does that make sense?

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View bayspt's profile

bayspt

292 posts in 2305 days


#7 posted 1608 days ago

ah yea, guess I should have read the post better. For a box side, I would use Alex’s method. It will take some test cuts to get setup perfect though. Like he says, you can check the setup with cuts laid end to end against a dead flat referance surface.

-- Jimmy, Oklahoma "It's a dog-eat-dog world, and I'm wearing milkbone underwear!"

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1675 days


#8 posted 1608 days ago

I think you understand me correctly. I don’t have a picture, but that jig has worked for me very well. In my experience, it is pretty easy to get an almost perfect 90 degree angle and more difficult to get an almost perfect 45 degree angle. This technique allows you to be slightly off on the 45 and still have, what appears to be, a perfect miter.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Mike's profile

Mike

91 posts in 1766 days


#9 posted 1608 days ago

Maveric I went thru the same thing. The miter saw was a little scary with the small sides for the ring boxes and I couldn’t come up with a good enough jig.

I ended up with a simple sled on the table saw. I dedicated it to 45 cuts. I tilt my blade to 45 ( I have a mark on my table saw angle gauge) run a couple test cuts, check with a square, adjust as needed and ready to go. I cut one end, flip it over and push it agenst a stop block I clamp to the fence at the back of the slide and cut the other end.

Works preatty well. Somebody did suggest finishing off with the disk sander with a miter gauge but I don’t have a great disk sander and no miter gauge for it so I haven’t tried that.

Good luck
Mike

-- Mike, Cantral Oregon

View GregD's profile

GregD

606 posts in 1737 days


#10 posted 1608 days ago

I’ve used Alex’s method also, with good results, for sides up to about 3” or so. And I’m rather inexperienced. I was using a good blade but not a particularly great saw. I aligned the blade to the miter slot – that saw would slip out of alignment pretty regularly. You will also want your miter gauge to fit with no slop. Set the gauge to a 90 deg crosscut, check & adjust as necessary to get it spot-on. Then tilt the blade for the 45 deg bevel, again check & adjust as necessary. Now add an aux fence to the miter gauge and run it through the blade to give you zero clearance and also a clear idea of where the cut will be when you cut the work. On the test cuts use stock that is about the same size as the work. Relax and take plenty of time. Start with square stock.

-- Greg D.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase