LumberJocks

Newbie Questions

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by John posted 03-10-2016 03:25 AM 692 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2867 days


03-10-2016 03:25 AM

I’ve been woodworking for over 30 years and have never touched a lathe. I think mostly due a accident about 45 years ago in shop class where another student split his head open when the bowl flew off the lathe at full speed. Anyway, I want to make tool handles mostly but can’t justify buying a lathe that just may be more of a shop decoration. So, i built a lathe using a Dewalt Hammer Drill and turned a couple of handles but my 25 year old drill doesn’t have much life left in it so i’m thinking of replacing the drill with this motor i just picked up. The only problem is it’s top speed is 1710 RPM . Is that fast enough for my needs/wants? Any help from you turners would be appreciated.

John

-- John


15 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#1 posted 03-10-2016 03:28 AM

You bet. Mine goes to 2400 but I rarely go there.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1460 days


#2 posted 03-10-2016 03:34 AM

Sounds like a great project, building a wood lathe. Harbor Freight has a small wood lathe that gets pretty decent reviews that can be had for about $100 with a coupon. You may consider that as another alternative. Doesn’t have the bragging rights of making your own, but also less work than making something you won’t use very much.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2867 days


#3 posted 03-10-2016 04:55 AM

Great, looks like i’ll building me another lathe and I can leave out the mistakes that I made on the first one.

John

-- John

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#4 posted 03-10-2016 05:12 AM

While I love building stuff… in the case of a lathe, particularly for what you are looking to do, it would probably be easier (and maybe cheaper) to just get an older tube type lathe on CL for cheap. Finding one without a motor would be even cheaper and you can use your existing one to power it. That would give you the base frame, an already built spindle with speed change ability (stepped pulleys), a tail stock, tool rest(s) and probably some centers and other stuff. The tubes can be left as is, or you can cut them shorter if needed. Put it on a 1×8 or similar and you can clamp it to a bench when needed, and stand it up out of the way in a closet when not needed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2867 days


#5 posted 03-10-2016 07:58 AM

I’ver been searching craigslist but the only one in my area was sold before I got to it. I’m a builder with access to alot of scrap material and I enjoy the build. What exactly is a tube lathe though?

-- John

View Jeff2016's profile

Jeff2016

72 posts in 330 days


#6 posted 03-10-2016 12:03 PM

A tube lathe has a bed made of 2 tubes of some sort. A buddy of mine came across an old sears and roebuck companion lathe a couple weeks ago, and brought it to me for the price of a six pack.

I posted a pic of it here.

The lathe is set on 2 conduit tubes which I am debating upgrading to black pipe or solid steel bar stock for better rigidity when I finally decide where it will be going in the shop.

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2867 days


#7 posted 03-10-2016 03:34 PM

Price of a six pack? I’ll gladly give you a case for it. That’s a nice little lathe. I’m not interested in turning bowls, at least not now anyway. My main concern is 1710 RPM won’t be fast enough for turning spindles.

-- John

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1600 days


#8 posted 03-10-2016 05:23 PM

Have no knowledge of what tool vendors you have in Ecuador or prices. Your motor should be fine for a homemade wood lathe. For ideas might check out Google Images “homemade wood lathes.”

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1536&bih=762&q=homemade+wood+lathe&oq=homemade+wood+lathe&gs_l=img.3..0l8j0i30l2.218.17576.0.18946.29.20.4.5.5.0.273.2275.1j16j2.19.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..1.25.2285.ZKw_kC35XPU#imgrc=_

If click on any lathe that interest you there can give information you need to get started. You can always modify to meet your need and available materials you have.

Good luck with it.

-- Bill

View Jeff2016's profile

Jeff2016

72 posts in 330 days


#9 posted 03-10-2016 05:28 PM

I’m not sure on speeds yet myself. Most of my research has found recommendations of 1750 rpm or 3/4 horse motor.
Don’t hold me to it, but I would say you are in the ball park. I have an old air compressor 2hp motor laying around, just need to find a 4 step pulley for it.
My concern is too much speed, as I plan on turning mostly fishing lures and bobbers.

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#10 posted 03-10-2016 05:35 PM

I have the Large HF lathe with a 3/4 hp motor. It’s plenty for turning between centers especially without a reeves drive.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View JayCop's profile

JayCop

35 posts in 1899 days


#11 posted 03-10-2016 05:48 PM

1700 is enough. When I am production turning I usually spin at 3200rpm but that isn’t necessary to get the job done. Remember you can always use a pulley to make that 1700rpm higher just like my powermatic does. The motor on my lathe is 1700rpm but change the pulley setting and there you go 3200rpm.

View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2867 days


#12 posted 03-11-2016 12:53 AM

Ecuador? I live in Bakersfield, CA
Jaycop, didn’t know that was even possible. I don’t think I need 3200 rpm but then again, i’ve never used a lathe.
Thanks again for everyones responces. I’ll try to post some pics of what i’ve turned already with my “drill” lathe.

-- John

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#13 posted 03-11-2016 01:50 AM

That’s why I mentioned looking into getting a cheap lathe with all the parts you will need… you don’t really want to be limited to just a single speed. I guess you could get by with one speed, but it will make roughing out stuff rather interesting. With a 4 step pulley (on both motor and lathe spindle), you can start off slow until roughed out and then speed it up once it gets balanced. Around here, those tube type C-man and AMT type lathes show up in the $20-$50 range quite frequently. That would also get you a ready made headstock and tailstock, which will be the bulk of what you would need to build yourself otherwise.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 333 days


#14 posted 03-11-2016 02:15 AM

I use 3200 for roughing spindles. It’s totally awesome, like taking a shower in sawdust.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

View John 's profile

John

219 posts in 2867 days


#15 posted 03-11-2016 02:45 AM

Unfortunatly, Bakersfield is very limited in many ways. At least now I know my 1710 will ok for starts and I can just upgrade the motor later. Thanks again.

-- John

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com