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Odd table saw trunnion design.. Is it ok?

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Forum topic by noons posted 03-07-2016 02:03 PM 767 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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noons

5 posts in 273 days


03-07-2016 02:03 PM

Hi all,

Long time lurker, first time poster. So please be kind! :)

I’m in Australia and looking at buying a new table saw.

I’m currently looking at the following.
http://www.timbecon.com.au/sawing/table-saws/10in-hybrid-cabinet-saw

However, it has a strange trunnion design. The drive belt is INSIDE the dust shroud.

I’ve not seen a design like this before and am worried about dust build up on the drive shafts and possibly damaging the belt if larger peices of timber slide down the insert plate opening and jamming the drive mechanism.

Does anyone here have any comments on this?

It appears to be the best “bang-for-buck” saw available in Australia at the moment.

Thanks for the help!


7 replies so far

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#1 posted 03-07-2016 02:41 PM

That’s a good observation….I can’t imagine that it’d be an advantage where it is. Most are on the opposite side. That model isnt’ available in the US, but it looks to come from the same factory as the General International 50-200R, which was rated highly by Wood Magazine several months ago. I definitely think it’s worth more research. Maybe some research on the GI version could shed some light on the concern. The GI manual online….it’s hard to determine whether the drive belt is inside the dust shroud from a glance, but it can’t hurt to take a look.

One other minor concern I have is that the fence head is bolt to the t-square instead of welded.


The pic below is of the trunnions of the Laguna Fusion hybrid saw, and are nearly identical to the Baileigh and Jet Proshop hybrids. The drive belt is clearly on the opposite side of the blade:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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noons

5 posts in 273 days


#2 posted 03-08-2016 03:02 AM

Thanks for the reply! I really appreciate the input.

The General International does get a good wrap. It’s an odd design and I would prefer the design of the Laguna/Harvey/Baileigh but the price difference in Australia for those is a good $700.

I think I might end up getting the equivalent of the GI. It’s comes with a 3 year warranty, so if anything does happen, hopefully it will be covered.

The red colour is quite gross though!

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noons

5 posts in 273 days


#3 posted 03-08-2016 03:31 AM

From looking at the GI manual, it’s got the same design (belt inside dust shroud).

Maybe it’s not a issue… It just doesn’t look right!

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noons

5 posts in 273 days


#4 posted 03-10-2016 09:42 AM

I’ve got 3 options:

1. Ridgid R4512 (rebadged in Australia as a Sherwood) for $1079
2. Rikon 10-201 (Steel City 35990c) for $1669
3. This Sherwood/General International 50-200R for $1599

Can anyone point me in the direction I should go?
I’m leaning heavily towards this saw (General International/Sherwood) but just don’t want to be disappointed with it.

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#5 posted 03-10-2016 10:29 AM

With a good blade and good setup, all three have potential to be serviceable saws. There will be pros and cons with each. Which to get is going to be subjective.

Steel City is no longer in business, so long term parts availability might not be great. The fence is decent but great for a saw in this price range. Solid cast wings and cabinet mounted trunnions are a plus.

The R4512 had a history of alignment problems that’s supposedly been fixed, but it also has a pretty modest fence, steel wings, and a 13 amp motor. Price is attractive

The GI is pretty well received. The full enclosure, cabinet mounted trunnions, solid wings, and fence are pluses. I’m not sure what to make of that belt location….I never noticed it before, but now that I’ve looked for it, I see it these two hybrids, plus others like the Powermatic PM64B. It’s not optimum in my view, and I wouldn’t recommend running it without DC, but it might not be an issue.

If you have 240v available in your shop I’d consider going with the full 3hp cabinet saw in the Sherwood line. Otherwise, I still prefer this one, unless their hybrid, unless the price of the R4512 equivalent is pulling heavily on you….that one at least leaves funds for a better blade, wood, maybe a better miter gauge, etc.

Good luck!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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noons

5 posts in 273 days


#6 posted 03-10-2016 11:41 AM

Interesting you mention the PM64B. I’ve just had a look at the exploded view of the trunnion in the manual and it’s actually the EXACT same schematics as the General International.

I do have 240v (standard here in Australia) and it’s tempting to get the 3hp unit, however I need it to be semi-portable and the 3hp machine comes with a cast iron base for stability (you’re obviously paying for that).

For the price of the 3hp ($2k), I would probably just get the Baileigh/Harvey for $2.3k (even know that’s 2hp).

But unfortunately, I can’t justify spending that much – and I know I couldn’t get it past the Mrs!

Just not sure the Hybrid is worth the extra $520 over the Ridgid…

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#7 posted 03-10-2016 01:30 PM


...Just not sure the Hybrid is worth the extra $520 over the Ridgid…
- noons

I hear ya! 3hp is not a necessity, but at some point they have appeal and long term value relative to what you get for the money spent. At the end of the day when you go to glue up your boards, you won’t be able to tell which saw made the cut if you use a good blade on each. You might notice some difference while operating the saw, but the end result is the same. If you’re main objective is to cut pieces to make something, any of them will do fine, so it doesn’t make sense to spend a bunch more if you can’t justify it. If you’re like me, I not only want to cut boards, I also enjoy using and owning a superb machine that I know will last a lifetime and never flinch…there’s a fascination that’s nearly as much about the tool itself as it is the end results of woodworking. When I bought my 3hp cabinet saw I wasn’t really TS shopping….an awesome deal came up, and I was able to sell a couple of handplanes to cover the added cost, so I went for it. All of my previous saws could get the same end result, but the enjoyment of using and owning them varied. Only you can decide which one best suits you and your situation.

Keep us posted about what you end up with!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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