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Advice on how to do these doors or similar......

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Forum topic by Rovster posted 03-07-2016 02:02 PM 408 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rovster

4 posts in 278 days


03-07-2016 02:02 PM

New here but have been lurking for some time. First of all I’m no expert, but I have done a few projects that turned out great. For my next project I want to build an aquarium cabinet in a tropical or African theme. I got inspiration from the cabinets at Disneys Animal Kingdom Lodge. Here are the pics

http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff370/rovster/86E34344-CB1D-4F9C-A4DA-C777B9CFE26C_zpsdvf10kkc.jpg

http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff370/rovster/A626F181-DD30-4141-96A9-EC4EA45EB483_zpsvfaeeysn.jpg

Now I don’t have the woodworking vocabulary to describe the finish and door inserts so I’ve been having trouble even looking things up. I love the door inserts but I have no idea what it’s called or where to start. I was even thinking some rattan as a runner up. I also saw some videos on YouTube on how to “age” wood both physically by beating it with several objects and different ways of finishing it.

Any tips, insights, suggestions on how to carry out a piece like the above would be great. The last aquarium stand I built turned out great, “almost” furniture grade but it seems I get better and better with each project. I have access to basic tools but nothing fancy, but I’m not opposed to buying tools to finish a project. Thanks all!!!


9 replies so far

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#1 posted 03-07-2016 03:11 PM

That’s a very cool idea. Maybe a veining bit in a router? I distressed my pirate bar with a torch, beat it with a chain and randomly drilled worm holes into it.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1732 days


#2 posted 03-07-2016 03:24 PM

Sounds the Capt’s idea is the easiest.

View Rovster's profile

Rovster

4 posts in 278 days


#3 posted 03-07-2016 04:37 PM



That s a very cool idea. Maybe a veining bit in a router? I distressed my pirate bar with a torch, beat it with a chain and randomly drilled worm holes into it.

- CaptainSkully

I have a router, never heard of a veining bit but will look into it thanks. The other thing I thought of was just getting some round 1/4 stock and just gluing it in place? Sounds like a lot of work but whatever it takes! I’m going to take a piece of stock and beat the crap out of it this weekend and try some test finishes. Any suggestions on the carving? What kind of tools will I need for that? I’m pretty artistic, just have to know how to apply it. Thanks so far. I’m really excited to take things to the next level. Here is how my last project turned out….
[URL=http://s1232.photobucket.com/user/rovster/media/Stand%20Build/IMG1595.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff370/rovster/Stand%20Build/IMG_1595.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

[URL=http://s1232.photobucket.com/user/rovster/media/Stand%20Build%20complete/IMG1709zps60389cf1.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff370/rovster/Stand%20Build%20complete/IMG_1709_zps60389cf1.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

[URL=http://s1232.photobucket.com/user/rovster/media/Stand%20Build%20complete/IMG6036_zpsf1144b7d.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff370/rovster/Stand%20Build%20complete/IMG_6036_zpsf1144b7d.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1807 posts in 605 days


#4 posted 03-07-2016 04:57 PM

The “point cutting roundover” bits here should do the job.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Rovster's profile

Rovster

4 posts in 278 days


#5 posted 03-07-2016 05:28 PM

Thanks! Time to build a router table! Cant imagine doing that with a strait edge. That’s all I’ve been using until now.

View ddockstader's profile

ddockstader

151 posts in 2728 days


#6 posted 03-07-2016 06:54 PM

Before you try to make these out of a solid piece of wood, it looks to me (based on the grain and number of nail holes) that these are made by just pin nailing pieces of half-round at a 45 degree angle. You could make the half-round by running a board past a bull nose bit on your router and then slicing it off on the table saw and pinning it to the base piece behind it.

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Rovster

4 posts in 278 days


#7 posted 03-09-2016 11:19 PM

Not sure if this helps, but it felt like the diagonal pieces were “hollow”. I wonder if it was molded? Either way I’ve got some good ideas to work with and some mock fabricating I need to do. Thanks all!

Another question, what is the best tool to do the carvings on the trim pieces? I picture a V-shaped carver but I know nothing about carving wood, but I can make a heck of a Jackolantern! Thanks!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

700 posts in 854 days


#8 posted 03-09-2016 11:49 PM

Pretty sure that it is just made with dowels or half rounds attached to a piece of plywood that was painted black and then framed with the door frame. Or the half rounds or dowels could have been attached to the frame and then backed with the black plywood for the same net design.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#9 posted 03-12-2016 04:00 PM

Due to the overwhelmingly better advice above, I retract my veining bit suggestion. I thought the slats weren’t straight. After looking at it a second time, I think thin wood stock, with a bullnose bit on both edges, then ripping off the quarter-round at the table saw, glue and brad into position inside the face frame, then distress.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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