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quarter and flat sawn oak

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Forum topic by Fireguy posted 02-26-2010 03:25 PM 1288 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Fireguy

132 posts in 1990 days


02-26-2010 03:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip

I am planning on building a storage bench for my mother and I am planning to use quarter sawn red oak for the Legs, front, drawer fronts, and top and using oak for the sides and back.

Has anyone mixed these? I am wondering how it will look.

-- Alex


8 replies so far

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4525 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 02-26-2010 03:35 PM

If the design will allow me to hide the edges, I would probably use oak plywood on the sides and back. It will be more stable and you won’t have to worry much, if any, about wood movement.

Personally, I see nothing wrong with combining QS red oak and oak (or oak plywood).

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Fireguy's profile

Fireguy

132 posts in 1990 days


#2 posted 02-26-2010 07:09 PM

thanks Rich,

the sides are set in about 1 1/2” form the edge of the front so the side will not be very visable. I was thinking of using plywood for cost and sability.

-- Alex

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#3 posted 03-04-2010 01:52 AM

Although I am new to woodworking, one of the next projects I’m going to tackle is a set of built-in bookcases with doors, and an adjoining mantel.

I mention this because I am in the same boat as you. I was going back on forth on whether or not to use a combination of plywood and oak, or all hardwood. I think I’ve finally decided that I’m going to build the carcasses out of plywood, then use riftsawn white oak for the faceframes, top, doorframes, etc. This will give me the quality look of the riftsawn white oak on the most prevalent surfaces, with the benefit of stability and cost savings on the carcasses.

I had thought about using quartersawn plywood. It wouldn’t really have saved me much money, so to speak, as that stuff is really expensive, but it would’ve given me stability and less joinery required.

And I suppose the combination together is a personal preference thing, but I think it’ll look fine and might actually make the frame “pop” a bit more as the flecking/ribbon will only be on that part of the bench.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1823 days


#4 posted 03-04-2010 02:07 AM

I think that you need to check this website to understand the differences in how plywood is “sawn”. Its’ stability is about the core material and construction – not how the veneer was sawn.

http://www.industrialplywood.com/04prod_cab_oak_r.html

Rotary sawn just means the the log was cut like unrolling toilet paper. This is the least expensive, but gives the “wildest” grain pattern. Other cutting methods give grain patterns more like solid boards.

Personally, I wouldn’t like the look of QS boards and rotary sawn ply – but that’s just me. – lol

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 03-04-2010 02:25 AM

Well I was thinking it was a built-in bench, but he didn’t specify, just said the sides wouldn’t be very visible. Guess I put my own “built-in” twist on it?

Will you see the oak plywood, or not?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Fireguy's profile

Fireguy

132 posts in 1990 days


#6 posted 03-04-2010 04:51 PM

My bench is not a built in but the sides will no be visible when it is put where it is going ( small room with furniture on either side of it). From what I have found quarter sawn plywood or veneer is very expensive, I could build the sides out of the hard wood but that would add cost to the project as well. So I am just looking to get some thoughts on this, I have not started the project yet, still waiting for warm weather so I can get started working in the shop again.

-- Alex

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1823 days


#7 posted 03-04-2010 05:09 PM

You can control costs to some extent by making a cutting plan that will wring the maximum number of the most visible pieces from a sheet of the primo plywood. Then, “cherry-pick” a sheet of less expensive ply for an acceptable grain pattern for the less visible pieces.

This takes a bit of planning and scheming, but often works pretty well.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 2541 days


#8 posted 03-06-2010 02:54 AM

I also do not see anything wrong with mixing the ply with the solid wood.

However: You will have to take wood movement into consideration if you are planning a solid wood top going onto ply sides. The sides won’t expand, but the top will, so plan on using figure eights or table top “s” clips, etc when attaching it. To eliminate wood movement as a consideration, the top will need to be ply also. Nothing wrong with a flat-sawn ply top with QS edge banding.

Another consideration: With red oak, you have quite a few different species of tree that fall into the “red oak” category. (black oak, blue oak, water oak, Spanish oak, spotted oak,possum oak, swamp oak, etc). The colorations range considerably, so you may want to take a sample of the ply and try to get a close color match on the solid wood. At the lumber store, all you will see is “red oak”, and may see different colorations in the lumber pile, depending on the trees the loggers supplied.

I also think a good look is using flat sawn for door/drawer faces, with a quarter-sawn face frame.

JMTCW

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

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