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40 oak tables refinishing for a restraunt

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Forum topic by Hoosier1989 posted 03-06-2016 02:29 AM 670 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hoosier1989

4 posts in 276 days


03-06-2016 02:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: refinish durable oil poly

So I have a job for a restraunt of 40 oak butcher block tables. The old finish is a old oil base poly but on with one thick by the owner 7 years ago. Let’s just the finish is not pretty. Pizza pans stick, cups, napkins and menus all stick to this massive failure of finish. The first finish I tried was rubio mono coat, it turned out nice but not near as durable or water proof as I wanted. Rubio is convient but the price, durableity and almost “ashy” dry look I’m not a fan of. 1 coat seems to scare me too. So I switched to a oily poly blend. 2 coats 1/3 BLO 1/3 mineral spirits 1/3 satin poly. Then 2 coats of 45% poly 45% mineral spirits 10% BLO. All using the wipe on wipe off Sam maloof technique. I’m letting the tables set after final coat for 3-5 days before I deliver. I’m slowly but surely doing 4 tables a week and my third cycle. They are happy with the new finish. My question is do you guys think it is durable enough, if it will hold up against food, alcohol, water and wear well? Do you think applying coats 8-12 hours apart is ok and if less it’s a no no or ok. Is 3-5 days cure time enough or should I let it cure longer? All tables are going into direct use after the cure. I put some before and after pictures of the tables.


-- cashcow, Indiana


7 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

686 posts in 1258 days


#1 posted 03-06-2016 02:53 AM

No it’s not goods enough.There’s just no solids in that’s finish. I have passed on jobs like that’s because I don’t spray conversion varnish with high solid content.

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Hoosier1989

4 posts in 276 days


#2 posted 03-06-2016 04:13 AM

Well what do you think I can do? I’m 1/4 done with the project? Is it workable or a complete failure?

-- cashcow, Indiana

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#3 posted 03-06-2016 02:00 PM

Maybe you can top them off with a coat of Cabot poly. It is very thick.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1111 days


#4 posted 03-06-2016 02:15 PM

I think you’d be done much more quickly and have better results if you spent a few hundred bucks on a hvlp gun and sprayed conversion varnish. You could shoot all 40 tables in a day or two, and the finish would be rock solid.

However, if you’ve already started….not sure you can switch midway without redoing the ones you’ve already refinished. That’s a personal choice.

Commercial tables will last a year or so with regular poly. Plus the BLO is weakening the poly so maybe less.

-- -Dan

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

303 posts in 1922 days


#5 posted 03-06-2016 02:54 PM



I think you d be done much more quickly and have better results if you spent a few hundred bucks on a hvlp gun and sprayed conversion varnish. You could shoot all 40 tables in a day or two, and the finish would be rock solid.

However, if you ve already started….not sure you can switch midway without redoing the ones you ve already refinished. That s a personal choice.

Commercial tables will last a year or so with regular poly. Plus the BLO is weakening the poly so maybe less.

Yep, CV would be the way to go. Once you’ve used it, you’re addicted.

Honestly, that job has take the top to a shop with a time saver and find a pro sprayer to lay the CV all over it… To set up spraying would an ordeal for someone who doesn’t have a booth, compressor big enough to spray that much, etc. I’ll bet you could charge enough to make some money and have the worked farmed out… Most shop just don’t want to move all that stuff, but ate glad to process it.

- Pezking7p


View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1449 days


#6 posted 03-07-2016 12:57 PM

Have to agree with all of the above. Don’t see a reason for the BLO in any of the coats. If you can’t figure out a reasonable way to do the CV, at the least remove the BLO from the equation, using just the thinned poly. An uncut (or 10%) satin poly final coat or 2 brushed on will hold up better.

View CueballRosendaul's profile

CueballRosendaul

484 posts in 1600 days


#7 posted 03-13-2016 12:59 AM

Use a good hardwood floor finish. They’re bullproof.

-- Matt CueBall Rosendaul. I don't think I've ever had a cup of coffee that didn't have cat hair or sawdust in it.

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