LumberJocks

need help deciding

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by westside posted 02-26-2010 04:11 AM 996 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View westside's profile

westside

77 posts in 2578 days


02-26-2010 04:11 AM

I have a basement woodshop, I can’t decide if I should buy an electric planer or use that money and buy a nice Lie-Nelson smoothing plane. I am worried about the dust and the noise from an electric planer. Are they loud? i have never used one before so I can’t compare the noise to a tablesaw or a router. I am thinking I could probably get a really nice lie-Nelson plane for the price of an electric one. How would a hand plane compare to a electric plane? i am willing to do the work necessary to make it smooth.

i have access to a lot of slats from pallets at my work that look pretty nice. I am just wondering what would be the best option.

Thanks in advance, Rich


12 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#1 posted 02-26-2010 04:21 AM

That’s kind of like asking if you should fly or take the train to your next vacation destination. They are two totally different experiences, and it all depends on what you want to do.

Electric planers are noisy… much more than a table saw. But they are also quick and easy. I personally can’t imagine using a hand plane to change the thickness of a board, but some guys really enjoy hand planing.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3559 days


#2 posted 02-26-2010 04:21 AM

What are you trying to build? With handplanes, you usually need 3 planes to work rough stock.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View westside's profile

westside

77 posts in 2578 days


#3 posted 02-26-2010 04:28 AM

thanks guys, Not sure what. i just want to find better prices than at the big box stores. I really like using handplanes though. Wayne, are you saying I need a smoothing plane and what else?

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3559 days


#4 posted 02-26-2010 04:29 AM

Jointer and a Fore or Jack plane tuned for rough work.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 02-26-2010 04:30 AM

When you say “electric planer” are you talking about a thickness planer or a hand held planer? For what it is worth, I own a hand held planer and I find it very difficult to work with. In retrospect, I wish I had remained focused on hand held non-electric planes. On the other hand, I really like my bench top Dewalt thickness planer. It is loud (very loud) but it does a great job.

If you want a hand held electric planer, I have one I will gladly sell for half of my original cost.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View patron's profile

patron

13535 posts in 2803 days


#6 posted 02-26-2010 04:30 AM

you are talking about a hand electric planer ,

not a machine ?

the hand plane is very labor intensive ,
and as stated you need more than one .

the electric hand plane is much faster ,
but as such is easier to overdo it .

the machine planer , makes your boards parallel ,
but best used in conjunction with a jointer .

what are you planing on doing ?
that will have a bearing on the tools you need .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3559 days


#7 posted 02-26-2010 04:31 AM

Also for a power planer to really be effective you need a jointer. Joint edge, joint face, plane to parallel rip to width.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View westside's profile

westside

77 posts in 2578 days


#8 posted 02-26-2010 04:37 AM

Sorry for the confusion. i meant a thickness planer, not the handheld electric planer. I could not for the life of me think of the name thickness planer. A senior moment. LOL!

What would the price difference be between buying a thickness planer and some really good hand planers? I really don’t want to run a thickness planer in my basement. I guess if I had to, I could put it in my garage and just use it during the non winter months.

thanks for your help, rich

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2537 days


#9 posted 02-26-2010 04:48 AM

In my opinion, a thickness planer and a non-electric plane are two very different tools for two very different purposes. I don’t really understand comparing the two. This is the classic case of “what do you want to do?”. A thickness planer is great for smoothing boards up to 12+ inches wide and/or reducing the thickness of a board. A non-electric planer is more for making clean edges and a few other miscellaneous tasks. Decide what you want to do and what you should buy will be obvious.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3559 days


#10 posted 02-26-2010 04:56 AM

I am going to low end with a reasonable price. Dewalt is a nice choice but over $600. Lots of other nice 6” and 8” jointers.

Planer
http://www.amazon.com/DELTA-ShopMaster-TP305-2-Inch-Portable/dp/B0007DFWR6/ref=sr_1_20?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1267152343&sr=1-20

Jointer
http://www.amazon.com/Grizzly-G0654-6-22-46-22-Jointer/dp/B0017IF2NE/ref=sr_1_38?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1267152483&sr=1-38

Handplanes – LV is less expensive than LN so will list some of them.

Smoother
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=51870&cat=1,41182,52515

Jointer
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=52414&cat=1,41182,52515

Jack
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=49708&cat=1,41182,52515

You could get an extra blade for your Jack and use it as a smoother. Also you could find and tune a set of pre-WW2 stanleys if you wanted to take the time.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View patron's profile

patron

13535 posts in 2803 days


#11 posted 02-26-2010 05:27 AM

if noise is a problem ,
you can go this route .

http://lumberjocks.com/brklnguy/blog/13733

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1546 posts in 3223 days


#12 posted 02-26-2010 05:41 AM

All of the popular bench top thickness planers on the market today are powered with universal type electric motors at speeds 10,000 rpm and higher. They are very loud, to the point of causing hearing loss to those who do not like to wear hearing protection. Unless you put some soundproofing on the ceiling of the basement, your woodworking is not going to be popular with the rest of the family.

Chris Schwartz, the editor of “Popular Woodworking” magazine is the guru of hand planes. Invest in his book, “Handplane essentials” or his DVD. To plane rough sawn boards he uses three planes; first, the #6 fore plane to quickly remove material, then the #7 jointer plane to flatten the board, and then the #4 smoothing plane which gives the board a final finish.

The Lie-Nielsen planes are certainly super to use. However, on this LJ site there are a great many posting of guys who have refurbished old and neglected Stanley/Bailey planes, and have made useful tools out of them once again. This would be a great way to obtain the planes that you need at modest cost. The work that you put into them will serve to improve your skills in using them as well. Good luck.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com