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Forum topic by Jonathan posted 03-04-2016 11:37 PM 944 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jonathan

18 posts in 774 days


03-04-2016 11:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: carving modern question trick tip resource

How is this “crater” made?
The diameters seem to be approximately 4 inches


24 replies so far

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No12

4 posts in 439 days


#1 posted 03-04-2016 11:47 PM

I did something similar by regrinding a paddle bit.

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#2 posted 03-04-2016 11:52 PM

Cove bit in a plunge router (also known as a round nose bit).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2657 posts in 2644 days


#3 posted 03-04-2016 11:52 PM

Round cutter in a drill press, or a special router bit.

-- Allen, Colorado

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

18 posts in 774 days


#4 posted 03-05-2016 01:04 AM

Since the circle is probably more than 3 inches diameter, how does one make the crater with a smaller cove bit?


Cove bit in a plunge router (also known as a round nose bit).

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2445 days


#5 posted 03-05-2016 01:17 AM

Based on the above picture, it doesn’t look 3” in diameter, perhaps 2 to me. You can get very large cove bits. other ways to get it: CNC with a ball nose end mill, make your own cutter from steel rod, or spin the board relative to a circular saw blade with the center of the divot being the right over the top of the blade. That last suggestion is insanely dangerous, and I wouldn’t recommend it in any way, shape, or form.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#6 posted 03-05-2016 01:19 AM

Since the circle is probably more than 3 inches diameter, how does one make the crater with a smaller cove bit?

Good question :) I’ve seen round nose bits up to 3 inches… can’t say I’ve seen them larger but they might be out there somewhere. Are you sure those divots are larger… kind of looks like 1x (1×6, 1×8 maybe) stock or thereabouts, so based on the scale compared to the board edge, they don’t look that large.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Jonathan

18 posts in 774 days


#7 posted 03-05-2016 01:44 AM

Thanks Brad :)
They are for dips. Guacamole and salsa for example. So the coves are 3” 3.5” or even 4”

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1180 days


#8 posted 03-05-2016 12:37 PM

I’m wondering if someone doesn’t make a bit just for this kind of application, something that certainly wouldn’t be spun as fast as a router and would require more torque, for use in a drill press for example. Below is a 2 3/4” rosette cutter designed to be used in a drill press and I would imagine it wouldn’t be too hard to get one made. It might be somewhat expensive for a custom grind from carbide, but tool steel wouldn’t be.

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1301 days


#9 posted 03-05-2016 01:03 PM

You start out by placing the dip on the flat board and let the guests dig out the hole by their fondness for dip. Hey, I didn’t have another feasible answer..lol

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bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1180 days


#10 posted 03-05-2016 01:41 PM

^ Yeah but wouldn’t you have to serve them chips made from steel or carbide? Depending on how tasty the dip is, it might still work.

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

121 posts in 933 days


#11 posted 03-05-2016 02:19 PM

I’ve done similar pieces on my lathe, using 3 or 4 different centers. It’s a bit scary having a propeller turning around, but the turning itself is quick and easy.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

605 posts in 2543 days


#12 posted 03-05-2016 03:31 PM

Holy shat!

I’m in the wrong business! Cool idea…but…?

400.00 dollars for a piece of wood…?? I’m gonna be rich…

http://www.thewoodenpalate.com/products/small-dip

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2631 posts in 2569 days


#13 posted 03-05-2016 04:28 PM

Wow! For that kind of scratch, the cost of the bit would easily be recouped.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#14 posted 03-05-2016 05:56 PM

Holy snap! That is a high mark-up.

-- Brian Noel

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#15 posted 03-05-2016 06:39 PM

you could try something like this but in your case you would have to make a jig to let a circular saw turn in circles on top of you wood ,sounds crazy but so does turning a bowl on a table saw.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv3IxAgCS2c

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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