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Forum topic by jtm posted 03-04-2016 07:57 PM 1250 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtm

218 posts in 1103 days


03-04-2016 07:57 PM

Hi all. Quick question.

I need to build a 4ft wide by 8ft tall dividing wall for my shower. I’m using large format tile, so the wall needs to be as flat as can be.

I have 2×4 and 2×6 lumber, but none of them are straight enough (and yes, I’m holding them to fine woodworking standards).

I was thinking of 2 options. I could take two 2×6, joint them, laminate, and then joint/plane/rip to 2×4 dimensions.

Or I could buy a few 2×12 and rip them to quartersawn 2×4 dimensions. This option may still have less than perfect straightness though.

Any thoughts on which way to go? I know it seems like I’m trying to apply fine woodworking techniques to framing, but I know I’ll have to true up the studs eventually, and now would be much easier than planing/shimming crowned and bowed studs in place.

Thanks


32 replies so far

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 407 days


#1 posted 03-04-2016 08:13 PM

Just plumb and square framing is all that is needed. The green board you’ll use has tapered edges so you’ll need to tape and feather them anyway. The tile set will take care of the rest.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

452 posts in 1401 days


#2 posted 03-04-2016 08:24 PM

Have to agree with above. This is a complete waste of time that in no way will influence the end product (unless you selected 2 x stock that was complete junk). In the end it will come down to your ability to lay tile that will actually determine how the final product looks (but could blame the studs if it doesn’t go well).

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2548 days


#3 posted 03-04-2016 08:25 PM

+1 for Bill. If the 2x is less than 1/8 out over the length us it. Should be able to get 5 or 6 from a big box store that are better than this. The tile set will be about 3/16” thick and the backer helps smooth any little differences from stud to stud.

-- Chris K

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splintergroup

829 posts in 689 days


#4 posted 03-04-2016 08:26 PM

For a flat wall use metal studs.

Avoid any gypsum based wall board and use cement based board as your tile underlayment.

View DirtyMike's profile (online now)

DirtyMike

463 posts in 368 days


#5 posted 03-04-2016 08:48 PM

wood working perfection is not needed when framing, build your wall on a flat surface if you can the erect it. Hardie board is my preferred backer for tile, tape and mortar screw heads. I like to use a flexible mortar when using big tile, I highly recommend back buttering your tile.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 407 days


#6 posted 03-04-2016 09:02 PM

Yeah Hardie Board would be the call here, but he’ll still need to feather the joints well. I think he’s making it more complicated than it should be. Plumb and straight will get him where he needs to be. Metal studs or wood studs will work. Personally I would use wood studs.


For a flat wall use metal studs.

Avoid any gypsum based wall board and use cement based board as your tile underlayment.

- splintergroup


-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#7 posted 03-04-2016 09:35 PM

Joint an edge of oversized stock and rip to the required dimensions. I have seen some fir that was labeled “studs” at the home center, but it looked more like KD firewood to me.

There is no harm in starting with straight lumber.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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conifur

955 posts in 618 days


#8 posted 03-04-2016 09:58 PM

As a tile installer for over 20 years, you DONT tile over green board in a wet environment, Cement Board or DenShield, tape/ fiberglass mesh, and mud the seams with thin set mortar and and thin set mortar to set the tile.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jtm's profile

jtm

218 posts in 1103 days


#9 posted 03-04-2016 10:15 PM

Thanks for the replies folks.

My biggest concern is my frameless shower door. There is no out of plumb adjustment, so the two walls need to be perfectly parallel, and perfectly square to the curb.

I’ve done plenty of drywall and rough construction, so I’m well aware of how loose tolerances can be for framing, but tileing a shower with a frameless door seems like a different ballgame.

As a woodworker, I have all the tools to make perfectly dimensioned lumber. I figured in this case it might actually be worth going the extra mile.

For reference, I didn’t want to use leviling compound on my floor since it would add too much height at the threshold. So I built a router sled and planed them down perfectly flat and level. (I have oversized joists for the span, which enabled me to do this)

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conifur

955 posts in 618 days


#10 posted 03-04-2016 10:33 PM

I did not install the shower doors if they were frameless, I had a sub that did that, Wisconsin Shower Door and Glass, but I would think there has to be some adjustment in the hinges for that and on the sweep at the bottom of the door. I do know that on framed shower doors which I would install, there is a lot of room for adjustment for square on the hinged and latch side.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jtm's profile

jtm

218 posts in 1103 days


#11 posted 03-04-2016 10:38 PM

This is the door:

http://m.homedepot.com/p/DreamLine-Enigma-X-44-to-48-in-x-76-in-Frameless-Sliding-Shower-Door-in-Brushed-Stainless-Steel-SHDR-61487610-07/204371080

The installation guide, product specs, and even some reviews describe how there is no room for error.

View GregD's profile

GregD

783 posts in 2602 days


#12 posted 03-04-2016 11:38 PM

I have only a little experience setting tile (1000 square ft floor with 17” tile , and 1 kitchen backspash with 12” tile). I find it easier to set tile flat if the substrate is flat. I tile VERY slowly.

I see no harm in ripping 2×6’s down to 2×4 size to minimize the curve of the wall. If you find the backer board comes out a little more curved than you like you can flatten the wall with thin set using a level. First define the plane of the wall with dots of thin set. Let them set up good. Then fill in lines of thin set between adjacent dots, screeding the thin set to be level with the reference dots. Let them set up hard. Finally, fill in the area between adjacent reference lines with thin set and use the reference lines and a straight edge to screed the thin set to the correct thickness. This process eats up a lot of drying time (3 days or 3 half days), but is easy to get good results – flat to within 1/16” or less. At a minimum you can precisely control the opening for your door assembly.

The main advantage to having a flat substrate is that if you are consistent with the amount of thin set you put down, the tile will, on average, land in about the right spot (distance from the wall). But you still have to work pretty hard to make sure you get the tile parallel to the wall and even with the adjacent tile. I imagine people experienced with setting tile can make adjustments on-the-fly and get good results. I am not one of them.

My shower has a frameless door (hinged, not sliding) that was installed in March. During summer droughts the house (2 story brick) shifts enough that the door won’t clear the fixed panel.

-- Greg D.

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 618 days


#13 posted 03-04-2016 11:49 PM

JTM, if you can return it or not buy it yet, I would find a glass/custom shower door place in your local, and get a quote, 650 seems like alot with that risk, even if they cost a bit more, and install it, it is guaranteed, this HD is all on you, what is that worth to you?

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jtm's profile

jtm

218 posts in 1103 days


#14 posted 03-05-2016 12:15 AM

I checked custom enclosures.

They were in the multiple thousand dollar range.

I actually decided on a shower size to fit this door specifically due to the reviews.

I picked it up a few months ago, so I can’t return it.

I don’t question my ability to install it. If anyone can get plumb, level, square wood, its a Lumberjock.

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

321 posts in 2501 days


#15 posted 03-05-2016 12:24 AM

I’d buy 2×8’s and rip them into two “2×4”’s (1.5×3.5). The lumber for 2×8’s is almost always better wood than 2×4’s. A lot of 2×8’s have pith in the middle, but if it’ well centered, it will be in the waste. Then you’ll have quartersawn 2×4’s!

I would generally not bother with doing this, but I totally get that it’s a special project.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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