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Drillpres speed

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Forum topic by majuvla posted 03-04-2016 02:13 PM 681 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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majuvla

9935 posts in 2445 days


03-04-2016 02:13 PM

Hello all LJs,

I would like to know, from your own experience, which drillpress speed is comonly used for most of woodworking project?
I want to avoid constantly changing of top belt set-up and adjust one speed which will be sufficient for most of projects – so drilling from 3 – 40mm holes.

Thanks for all answers and suggestions.
Cheers,
Ivan

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted


14 replies so far

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1061 posts in 2708 days


#1 posted 03-04-2016 02:27 PM

You’re not going to get good results when using one speed for 3mm to 40mm.

You can maybe get away with 1200-1500rpm for bits 20mm and smaller, but you really need to slow down with larger bits, or you’ll overheat them and ruin them.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 729 days


#2 posted 03-04-2016 02:40 PM

Also makes a big difference in speed with what kind of bit is being used, you would not want to run a Forstner bit as fast as a twist bit of the same size for example.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

338 posts in 1109 days


#3 posted 03-04-2016 03:02 PM

Ivan,

You could shoot for something in the middle, but you are giving a wide variety of sizes. Changing speeds to match the bit and task will give you the best results and increasing your bit life and safety. You can use large forstner bit at high speed, but it will ruin the bit due to heat and could scorch your project in addition to possibly ripping it out of you hands. Consider taking the time to change speeds for the task or get a second drill press, one set for slow speed, the other set for fast.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

921 posts in 1862 days


#4 posted 03-04-2016 04:22 PM

Not sure if this helps, but I find it useful:

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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SuperCubber

921 posts in 1862 days


#5 posted 03-04-2016 04:22 PM

Well, it looks difficult to read. If you want the PDF, PM me with your email.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View RichCMD's profile

RichCMD

349 posts in 1518 days


#6 posted 03-04-2016 04:43 PM

I like the chart, but never thought to look for something like it. I found a pdf version on-line without much trouble. Thanks for the idea.

-- Ride the bevel!

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1030 days


#7 posted 03-04-2016 04:52 PM

I leave my drill press on the middle setting for 95% of my work. I drop to the slowest speed for forstners over 1”

It seems to work well on my cheap Skil 5 speed press. I’ve done a lot of drilling with it over the past 2 years and has served me well.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

8668 posts in 1957 days


#8 posted 03-04-2016 11:35 PM

Mine is either on the fastest or slowest speed all the time. If I need it slow then I move it to slow where it stays until I need it fast. I’m too lazy to move belts all the time.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 729 days


#9 posted 03-05-2016 12:19 AM

I have an Shop Smith ER 10 with the speed changer, on low speed setting it goes from 425 to 1100 rpm variable speed, for a dedicated DP love it.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

6561 posts in 1063 days


#10 posted 03-05-2016 01:11 AM

First 3 speeds for wood. Last for wire wheels

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1037 posts in 497 days


#11 posted 03-05-2016 01:44 AM

majuvla,

I set mine up at slow speed back years ago when I bought the drill press and have never changed the speed. Changing pulley locations to adjust the speed is time consuming, a little confusing, and just something I do not want to do whenever I drill a hole. I cut mostly wood, but on rare occasion a little metal. I drill at this same low speed regardless of material, hole size, or bit type. I watch the cut and adjust the rate of feed based on my observations. Am I getting the very best rests? I do not know but my holes are just fine and my bits continue to cut well.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9935 posts in 2445 days


#12 posted 03-05-2016 07:48 AM

Thanks all for useful advices.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View REO's profile

REO

900 posts in 1651 days


#13 posted 03-05-2016 12:48 PM

Successful drilling is also a function of feed speed. The heat builds up not only because one has the speed is to fast bu also advancing the it through the material too slow. when feed slowly the chip created is smaller making it difficult to move or keep out of the way. The heat from the cutting edge is able to build up ahead of the advancing cutting edge and is not removed with the chip causing burnishing instead of a good cut. This heat is also hard on the cutting tool as well. when boring the hole for door handles with a forstner our machine is direct drive at 1725 rpm! But the typical drill press wouldn’t be powerful enough to match the feed and speed.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2911 days


#14 posted 03-31-2016 02:10 PM

I like to change my speed to suit the job, but it is a bit tiring, so I only change it when great accuracy is an issue. Otherwise, I normally keep a medium speed, but I almost always change the belt to slow it down for large diameter work.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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