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Can you recommend a ROS for rubbing out

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Forum topic by Rob posted 03-04-2016 09:42 AM 742 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rob

216 posts in 3132 days


03-04-2016 09:42 AM

I’m looking for a sander to help rub out finishes faster. I’m assuming I’ll need a disc type ROS. I’ve never owned one of these and currently use a Milwaulkee 1/4 sheet sander (they call it a ROS but I don’t think its really the same as the circle type). Anyway, I think I should base my purchase somewhat off of the discs that are compatible with the sander. For example, I looked on Bosch’s site and saw that their discs went to 320 grit, but I will need to go to at least 2000 for my purposes. I see that the Festool discs get into the 1000’s but I’m not sure if they fit other sanders or not. I don’t want to pay Festool prices if I can avoid it.

Any recommendations?

And a long shot question here … I have a dual action polisher. Can I just put sanding discs on it?

Thanks.


17 replies so far

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Rob

216 posts in 3132 days


#1 posted 03-04-2016 10:27 AM

I suppose it doesn’t matter what discs the sander takes as I get beyond 320 I will be wet sanding anyway. Ok, so I’ll probably just get a Bosch then.

So then my next question is 5 or 6 inch and why? I assume one is a little more powerful and covers a little more area faster, but a little harder to control. So if my objective is speed then that’s what I should get? As long as it finishes as well.

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2546 days


#2 posted 03-04-2016 01:07 PM

I use a Dewalt 5” ROS. It is an 8 hole hook and loop. It is one of the standard sizes. I do not know if you get much above 600. Sanding and polishing are not quite the same. I would assume the dual action polisher runs slower than a ROS so it does not burn the finish. Can you use rubbing compound when you get to 1000 and higher?

-- Chris K

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1979 days


#3 posted 03-04-2016 01:25 PM

I own eight ROS units. Don’t ask why, most of them just hang there in the ceiling hooks.

My go-to units are three, all Bosch, the BOSCH ROS20VSC 5 which is available at Lowe’s for $59.

It has a superior filter, sands evenly, and doesn’t have a tendency to jump when pressured a bit.

As far as the discs, you can buy a 25 pack of 2000 grit off Amazon for under twelve bucks.
http://www.amazon.com/Sungold-Abrasives-024264-5-Inch-Premium/dp/B008JT789U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1457097859&sr=8-1&keywords=2000+grit+sanding+disc

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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TMGStudioFurniture

55 posts in 283 days


#4 posted 03-04-2016 05:41 PM

For the higher grits, you might consider using the micromesh products. You can use these with water, and a small amount of soap for lubricant. I don’t think you want holes with these, since they will be wet.

http://www.amazon.com/MICRO-MESH-NO-HOLE-SANDING-COMBO/dp/B000H6JDDC/ref=sr_1_6?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1457113133&sr=1-6&keywords=micro+mesh+5%22

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TMGStudioFurniture

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pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2277 days


#5 posted 03-04-2016 06:11 PM

I feel like a ROS is much too aggressive for rubbing out a finish. I use 1500 grit soft sanding sponges to wet sand by hand. I have to wonder what is your finishing technique that still requires such aggressive sanding?
Just curious.

I did recently use a ROS with synthetic abrasive pad to clean a cast iron tool surface and that worked like a charm!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2088 days


#6 posted 03-04-2016 06:51 PM

For anything finer than 400 I would hand sand. You just can’t eliminate the swirl marks left by a ROS.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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Rob

216 posts in 3132 days


#7 posted 03-04-2016 06:58 PM



I feel like a ROS is much too aggressive for rubbing out a finish. I use 1500 grit soft sanding sponges to wet sand by hand. I have to wonder what is your finishing technique that still requires such aggressive sanding?
Just curious.

I did recently use a ROS with synthetic abrasive pad to clean a cast iron tool surface and that worked like a charm!

- pintodeluxe

It might be too aggressive but I think I’m going to find out. It just seems to take me all day to work a 66 cm diameter surface and I can still see sanding marks when I’m done. Now it could be that I’m taking to large of leaps in my grits. I was going from 400-800-1000-1500-2000-polishes. I’m happy to see the link posted above sells paper in smaller increments for the ROS (Thanks Tennessee!).

Anyway, I was using the 1/4 sheet sander and going over and over, perhaps 100 passes on a spot before the previous marks were gone. So I figured a ROS would just speed things up and couldn’t hurt.

This is on a surface with 10 coats of water-based lacquer by the way. I’ve tried the same technique on nitrocellulose lacquer with similar results.

Oh, regarding the Bosch. I see the ros10 model is the same as the ros20 but without variable speed. How important is variable speed for what I’m doing?

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Rob

216 posts in 3132 days


#8 posted 03-04-2016 07:03 PM



For anything finer than 400 I would hand sand. You just can t eliminate the swirl marks left by a ROS.

- jumbojack


I imagine though they become fine enough to not notice. My plan is to take it with the ROS to 2000 and then I’ll work with my DA polisher to remove the swirl. You don’t think that will work?

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Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2449 days


#9 posted 03-04-2016 07:08 PM

A ROS can leave relatively deep, swirly looking marks in the wood, even at higher grits. These can take a lot of effort to sand out. If you are wanting to do very high grit stuff, look for a variable speed ROS and get backing pads of different firmnesses. That will allow you to reduce some of those effects and not burn the finish. The big risk with a ROS on lacquer is that the edge of the disc can go so fast that it will create enough heat due to friction that it will soften and then push around the finish. Never bear down on it, let the grit do the work.

It’s not an ideal solution, but it will work. If you need to cut down finish, try a cutting compound, as it is made for that. Put it on a pad on your DA buffer and give it a whirl. There’s more than one way to skin this cat, just keep a few things in mind before going all in on it.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 394 days


#10 posted 03-04-2016 07:34 PM

I watched this video by “The Wood Whisperer” a while ago, and he used a ROS as part of the “rubbing out” process. Here’s a link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q94PuccM_s4

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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Rob

216 posts in 3132 days


#11 posted 03-04-2016 08:00 PM



I watched this video by “The Wood Whisperer” a while ago, and he used a ROS as part of the “rubbing out” process. Here s a link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q94PuccM_s4

- TheWoodRaccoon

Perfect! That only took him 7 minutes! ;)

Looks like his sander has some serious padding to it.

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 394 days


#12 posted 03-04-2016 08:12 PM


I watched this video by “The Wood Whisperer” a while ago, and he used a ROS as part of the “rubbing out” process. Here s a link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q94PuccM_s4

- TheWoodRaccoon

Perfect! That only took him 7 minutes! ;)

Looks like his sander has some serious padding to it.

- Rob

Lol sorry i should have told you…:)
My intuition tells me you don’t need the pads he has, you could probably use a soft interface hook-and-loop pad made by 3M for your ROS.

http://www.amazon.com/3M-Sanding-Interface-28321-Diameter/dp/B007ZT8YG6/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1457122344&sr=1-1&keywords=3m+clean+sanding+soft+interface+pad

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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Rob

216 posts in 3132 days


#13 posted 03-04-2016 08:18 PM



My intuition tells me you don t need the pads he has, you could probably use a soft interface hook-and-loop pad made by 3M for your ROS.

http://www.amazon.com/3M-Sanding-Interface-28321-Diameter/dp/B007ZT8YG6/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1457122344&sr=1-1&keywords=3m+clean+sanding+soft+interface+pad

- TheWoodRaccoon

That’s great! Thanks a lot!

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 394 days


#14 posted 03-04-2016 10:15 PM


My intuition tells me you don t need the pads he has, you could probably use a soft interface hook-and-loop pad made by 3M for your ROS.

http://www.amazon.com/3M-Sanding-Interface-28321-Diameter/dp/B007ZT8YG6/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1457122344&sr=1-1&keywords=3m+clean+sanding+soft+interface+pad

- TheWoodRaccoon

That s great! Thanks a lot!

- Rob

NP :)

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#15 posted 03-05-2016 09:44 PM

Another approach to consider would be to use a polisher/buffer with wool bonnet and a fine powder abrasive, like rottenstone. Just a suggestion for you to explore, since I have no expertise in this.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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