LumberJocks

Treated lumber dry time

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Brian posted 03-02-2016 10:47 PM 441 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Brian's profile

Brian

177 posts in 1499 days


03-02-2016 10:47 PM

I’ve got some treated decking to make chairs with at a customers request. I know this stuff is going to dry pretty bad but I’ve never built furniture with treated lumber. I typically use cypress or cedar for outside. Any ideas on what I can do to prevent my end products from being ruined when they dry? I can’t wait 3 months to start the projects unfortunately.

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor


10 replies so far

View Brian's profile

Brian

177 posts in 1499 days


#1 posted 03-02-2016 10:54 PM

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1944 days


#2 posted 03-03-2016 01:43 AM

Sticker the boards with 1” x 1” stickers every 12”. Put some weight on the top. Like cinder blocks if you have them. Run a box fan blowing through the stack. Your current spacing is too wide, and the boards will be more prone to bow and warp. Even without any top weight, the 12’ sticker spacing will give you flatter boards.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#3 posted 03-03-2016 03:48 AM

If I was you, I would put it together right away. As long as the boards have the same moisture content, they should all shrink together and not affect the end result.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

466 posts in 370 days


#4 posted 03-03-2016 04:19 AM

Brain I am currently doing the exact same thing as you right up the road. I will be building a prototype chair out of treated decking and 2×4’s to save money. Most of treated lumber i get is super wet. stacking with stickers with a fan on for just 2 weeks will do wonders before building. I have made projects with it fresh from the store but the shrinkage is terrible. here are some benches i made for the city of conway, decking boards were butted together when built, 3 months later..

View Dave G's profile

Dave G

303 posts in 1516 days


#5 posted 03-03-2016 10:09 AM

I did what you guys are discussing for the structure of a porch. I built wet and painted when dry 8 months later and it held paint. There were some pretty good drying cracks that I spackled with caulk while painting.

The reason I’m weighing in is I have concerns about using treated lumber with furniture. A chair has a person potentially in intimate contact with some nasty chemicals. I wouldn’t consider it at all for a picnic table, for instance. What’s the plan for that? Are the latest treatments less toxic? The old stuff I used had arsenic in it.

-- Dave, New England - “We are made to persist. that's how we find out who we are.” ― Tobias Wolff

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1982 days


#6 posted 03-03-2016 12:47 PM

They stopped using arsenic, chromium, or chromated copper arsenate at the end of 2003.
Currently they are using mostly copper based pesticides, which are considered minimal risk. There are exceptions, like truck beds, and non-residential applications like dock posts.
I don’t know much beyond what you buy at any lumber store for residential use is not going to have a chemical that is considered harmful to humans in it.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Brian's profile

Brian

177 posts in 1499 days


#7 posted 03-03-2016 02:10 PM

I’ll restack my lumber lumber tonight and put a box fan on it. I’d rather wait a couple weeks than have to throw them away and start over when it shrinks like a dry sponge.

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1944 days


#8 posted 03-05-2016 04:30 PM

The good thing is that pine dries fast, and the box fan will help that even more. Like Alton Brown saws on Good Eats on the Food Network, “Your patience will be rewarded.”

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

262 posts in 1286 days


#9 posted 03-05-2016 05:07 PM

I built a couple of Norm Abrams Andironak Chairs with wet 1×6 decking. After the wood dried out I had to go back and tighten the bolts and some screws. No big deal.
I would suggest that you not leave the wet wood on any cast iron surface over night.

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#10 posted 03-06-2016 01:53 AM

I’m not sure I’d use PT lumber for this kind of thing anyway. You are right to use Cedar which gains its rot resistance from its natural oils. Lumber used for pressure treating is typically porous (easily penetrated) and subsequently less stable stuff like balsam and hemlock. Not only does it typically warp but it will always swell and shrink with moisture content. Not to even mention the toxins…...

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com