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Help-How do I recreate this cabinet outer edge stile profile?

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Forum topic by HandyFrank posted 03-02-2016 07:29 PM 682 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


03-02-2016 07:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: beating bit cabinet stile router molding profiles

I’m new to woodworking, can someone help me understand how I can match this existing cabinet door’s outer edge stile profile? The bit I attempted to use that I thought I could cheat a bit ended up being far too deep.

Here are some pictures to show what I mean. Can anyone help me understand how I can achieve a matching edge stile profile? Is there a specialty bit that can do this, or a technique?

In the first pictures the white painted cabinet is the one I am attempting to match, and the oak sample is the piece I was hoping would match and does not match at all.

All tips appreciated!


17 replies so far

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chrisstef

15672 posts in 2472 days


#1 posted 03-02-2016 07:33 PM

Id say a scratch stock for the little depression there and a roundover bit for the edge.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


#2 posted 03-02-2016 07:44 PM


Id say a scratch stock for the little depression there and a roundover bit for the edge.

- chrisstef


Can you explain this more in detail? Sorry i’m new to woodworking so I’m note sure I know how, or have the tools. So I read up on scratch stock technique which lead me to Hock Tools and some great info. From what I gather I need to make the scratch stock blade for the depression, and then would use a roundover bit for the curve.

Could the scratch stock be custom cut and do the entire profile or would it be too difficult?

Any specific roundover bit you recommend or estimate I would need to match what I have?

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pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#3 posted 03-02-2016 08:35 PM

That’s just a roundover bit set deep enough to create a small shoulder. You can find a roundover bit at any home center or woodworking store.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#4 posted 03-02-2016 08:54 PM



That s just a roundover bit set deep enough to create a small shoulder. You can find a roundover bit at any home center or woodworking store.

- pintodeluxe


Agree…not so sure it can be done with the planned stock…that “bead” is already there and has to go away which will take a bit off the thickness. After that shallow passes with maybe a 1/2” round over cutter (hard to tell but just measure the distance from the edge to the shoulder to determine size). As the cutter gets progressively lower the shoulder will appear. Working in red oak…move slow enough to get a clean cut but fast enough to prevent burning.

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teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#5 posted 03-02-2016 08:54 PM

Double post day…sorry…

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2441 days


#6 posted 03-02-2016 09:06 PM

I need new eyes :( Pic 1 and 3 look like a groove on the face while pic 2 does look like a roundover with a shoulder…I think the light reflecting off white paint is messing me up.

Also, I can’t make out if it is a mitered corners or cope & stick.

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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


#7 posted 03-02-2016 09:06 PM



That s just a roundover bit set deep enough to create a small shoulder. You can find a roundover bit at any home center or woodworking store.

- pintodeluxe

That s just a roundover bit set deep enough to create a small shoulder. You can find a roundover bit at any home center or woodworking store.

- pintodeluxe

Agree…not so sure it can be done with the planned stock…that “bead” is already there and has to go away which will take a bit off the thickness. After that shallow passes with maybe a 1/2” round over cutter (hard to tell but just measure the distance from the edge to the shoulder to determine size). As the cutter gets progressively lower the shoulder will appear. Working in red oak…move slow enough to get a clean cut but fast enough to prevent burning.

- teejk02

Thanks guys. So the roundover if you look close is not a true round over, looks more like if you took and egg/oval and looked at 1 of the ends. Are roundovers with that sharper profile usually sold? With the technique you guys are mentioning if the roundover was slightly sharper of an angle (More egg shaped) it would definitely do the trick I think. I’m going to do some more testing with a plain roundover and see if I can get it to partially match.

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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


#8 posted 03-02-2016 09:12 PM


I need new eyes :( Pic 1 and 3 look like a groove on the face while pic 2 does look like a roundover with a shoulder…I think the light reflecting off white paint is messing me up.

Also, I can t make out if it is a mitered corners or cope & stick.

- hotbyte


It is mitered corners. The paint layers and color itself definitely make it harder to make out. The profile looks like an oval/egg standing tall, and it goes into an angled groove, so the groove isn’t a flat channel like the new bit cut, instead it is angled from the roundover. Hope that isn’t confusing you even more.

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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


#9 posted 03-02-2016 09:22 PM

Here is what it looks like in profile view, I think….

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pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#10 posted 03-02-2016 09:35 PM

Oh, okay I see it now. That’s not a profile I see very often these days. I’m sure an Infinity or Freud catalog would have a matching profile. Prepare to open your wallet for some of those specialty bits. Last time I went shopping for a specialty router bit they were asking more than I paid for my router table.

Generally they are called corner beading bits, but the trick is finding just the right one.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


#11 posted 03-02-2016 09:40 PM


Oh, okay I see it now. That s not a profile I see very often these days. I m sure an Infinity or Freud catalog would have a matching profile. Prepare to open your wallet for some of those specialty bits. Last time I went shopping for a specialty router bit they were asking more than I paid for my router table.

Generally they are called corner beading bits, but the trick is finding just the right one.

- pintodeluxe


Thanks for the feedback. A woodworker hobbyist friend is actually helping me on this one since he has all the tools, and he is doing the work.

He said that the radius is much more like an egg standing up, and a standard roundover radius bit is too long (Opposite of skinny like the egg standing on its side). So he tried a few things but said the roundover radius is still too long.

To go without spending on an extra bit, would it be ideal to cut a separate piece and nail/glue it on like this? Or is that a big no no and would it be prone to cracking the paint later with time? Or is this acceptable?

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2274 days


#12 posted 03-02-2016 10:45 PM

your overthinking it…..that profile can easily and quickly be done on the table saw.

Run on edge with back to fence

think about it for a minute….you ll see it.

edges can be sanded easily and eased to suit.

JB

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HandyFrank

35 posts in 2228 days


#13 posted 03-03-2016 08:08 PM


your overthinking it…..that profile can easily and quickly be done on the table saw.

Run on edge with back to fence

think about it for a minute….you ll see it.

edges can be sanded easily and eased to suit.

JB

- cabmaker


Thanks again everyone for the help. I myself don’t have a ton of experience with custom wood work, and the hobbyist helping/doing the work for me only has a few years so we are both in the learning phase with lots more to learn, so I’m sorry if this is a simple job for most and we aren’t grasping it, and I appreciate the help and guidance.

We can’t grasp how best to do this based on the easy recommendations. Seems like the roundover is just too rounded (Not oval enough) to give us a half decent matching profile.

If anyone has any more suggestions, or can help explain how best to achieve this with detail that we can grasp that would be awesome.

Relating to the question I asked earlier, an easy solution would be to cut a strip with a standard radius, then on the table saw cut both sides to minimize the radius, and glue/nail (Or tongue and groove) to the side of the stock. Would this be a bad way to go about it if we can’t get it done with a bit or lack the crafty talents?

Here is the question and picture again:
Would it be ideal to cut a separate piece and nail/glue (Or tongue and groove) it on like this? Or is that a big no no and would it be prone to cracking the paint later with time? Or is this acceptable?

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1440 days


#14 posted 03-03-2016 08:38 PM

that’s the way I would do it. Do a test piece.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#15 posted 03-04-2016 12:51 AM

I wonder if the original panel wasn’t built without the thicker interior perimeter boards that were added later. I did something similar on kitchen cabinets to create “the illusion”. Paint cracking? Looking at what you are trying to mimic I’d say that with time you’ll get enough paint on there so you won’t know it! Just kidding there…I used an Ace paint formulated for cabinets and my “facades” (what would be your interior perimeter trim) show no sign of paint failure.

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