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How would you clean up this dust collector?

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Forum topic by Killavolt posted 03-02-2016 03:46 PM 1613 views 1 time favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


03-02-2016 03:46 PM

Might be a misleading topic, sorry if it is, but I have this small 1HP dust collector, and I purchased a super dust deputy to use with it as well.

I’d love to close couple the fan to the cyclone, but it would seem that I can’t because I can’t mount my fan sideways to the separator like I see a lot of people have done. It has a rectangular bolt pattern.

The other caveat is that it has to be portable, both the collector and cyclone unit, and be able to fit through regular doorways so I can’t necessarily just build it all into a stand.

I’d like to have the dust collector and cyclone unit physically connected so they move together without putting strain on the ducting. I also want to improve the ducting such that it doesn’t have so many tight bends.

As it sits right now though it provides plenty of airflow for my needs, so even with all those bends it isn’t having a negative effect on my requirements for it

Basically I kind of just want to strengthen it up a little bit. as you can see it’s a little hard to remove the lid from the garbage can because of the solid ducting and if I do remove the can from the bottom I have nothing to support the weight of the dust deputy or ducting.

This is a pretty rough setup right now though I just fit everything together so I could play around with it.

Keep in mind that all I have for woodworking tools is a 12” miter saw and a circular saw, so I can’t just plop down a giant sheet of wood and start making accurate cuts.


27 replies so far

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

816 posts in 380 days


#1 posted 03-14-2016 12:42 AM

Killavolt,

My first thought is to create two stacks. The first stack is the filter and the fine dust bin located under the filter. The second stack would be the dust collection barrel on the bottom, the cyclone, and then the blower housing setting on top.

Obviously a support structure is required. It could start with a piece of 2’ x 4’ plywood as the base. The entire assembly would set on this platform. Round all four corners so when the corners contact something in the shop, the base will slide off the obstruction and not catch. The base would be on casters.

A frame would support the dust collection barrel, cyclone, and blower housing and the four platforms described below. 2” x 2” or 2” x 3” framing lumber could work. The frame would have four corner posts and cross members for lateral support. The frame is secured to the base. The frame would offer mounting points for the platforms.

The first platform would be plywood mounted high enough so the dust collection barrel can slide under it with room to lift the lid for easy empting. A hole in the center of the first platform would be sized so that a flex hose from the cyclone body to the dust collection barrel’s lid could pass through the first platform and penetrate the lid of the dust collection barrel.

Above the first platform is a second and third platform that would support the cyclone body. The length and width of the second and third platforms would be same as the first platform. The second platform would be mounted low and have a hole that will accept the lower portion of the cyclone body. The third platform would be a higher and a few inches below the cyclone inlet. A hole cut in the third platform, a little larger than the in the second platform would support the upper part of the cyclone body.

The fourth platform would have the same width and length as the first 3. The fourth platform would support the blower housing. It would have a hole through which a flex hose could be installed to make the connection between the top of the cyclone and the blower housing inlet. Some dowels installed around the perimeter of the blower housing into the plywood would kept the blower housing in place.

The only thing left is to make the connection from the blower housing outlet and the filter assembly. If the connection is square and therefore allows the blower housing to be rotated 90 degrees and keeps the bolt holes lined up, a direct connection could be made. However, cutouts in the platforms may be required to get the filter stack close enough to make the connection.

Assuming luck is not with you and a direct connection cannot be made, then building a pair of connecting adapters would be required. Both sets of connectors would be built the same, but dimensions and mounting hole locations may vary. The connection is two pieces of plywood (or 1” x 6” or 1” x 8” lumber) sandwiched together, penetrated by an HVAC 4” straight connector. A 4” hole through which the HVAC connector passes is cut through both pieces of plywood so that the holes align. A series of 1” long cuts are made about 1” – 2” apart in one end of a 4” HVAC straight coupling. The tabs created by the series of 1” long cuts are bent back. One piece of plywood is slipped over the straight coupler. Caulk is applied and the second piece of plywood is pressed into the caulk so that the bent tabs are captured by the plywood sandwich. The two pieces of plywood are screwed together. The adapter is then bolted in place and a flex hose connects the blower housing to the filter stack.

When done, the filter stack, cyclone and dust collection barrel are all on one platform, with the dust collection barrel, cyclone body and impeller housing setting inside the frame. The dust collection hose, firmly attached to the cyclone body, can be used to pull the unit since the cyclone body is firmly fixed in place by the second and third platforms and the base is on caters. However, I would not move the unit in this manner.

Emptying the barrel is possible because of the flex hose connecting the cyclone body to the dust collection barrel lid and the extra room left when the second platform was installed.

Cutting plywood is minimized by using 2’ x 4’ or 4’ x 4’ sheets. A straight edge and circular saw can make cuts too large for the mitre saw. Construction lumber and ½” plywood keep the cost low, however, I would consider using ¾” plywood for the base and to support the blower housing because of the weight these support.

If you want to minimize plywood, the second, third, and fourth platforms could be frames built with construction lumber.

I hope my description was not too confusing and, even if not used, that it gives you some fresh ideas. Good luck with your modifications.

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#2 posted 03-18-2016 05:54 PM

wow, long read, but I think that’s what I’m going to do, like this, but I’ll have to keep it shorter.
https://www.monolocoworkshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/20150711_2321161.jpg

The outlet on my blower is indeed rectangle so I can’t just turn it sideways, however, the company actually makes adapters that will work perfectly for me. They’re for a different collector that has a bag connected directly to the outlet, so it has a rectangle-4” round adapter that will allow me to turn it sideways and connect the blower to the filter assembly.

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sepeck

314 posts in 1602 days


#3 posted 03-18-2016 08:07 PM

There is a video of some guy mounting his on a wall. Slightly different setup, but one thing he did differently then pretty much everyone, was he mounted his cyclone (or thein) securely. Then he made a platform for the chip can, that was pushed up by a wedge, so when he wants to empty the can, he pops the wedge out from under the can and the can drops down. Easy easy. I will try and find the video link tonight and add it here.

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#4 posted 03-18-2016 08:25 PM

I can’t wall mount it, I need the entire unit to be portable and to fit through a regular sized door….... otherwise I would do just that probably.

It’s only a 1HP system so I don’t want to have long lengths of tubing cutting into my air flow.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1467 days


#5 posted 03-18-2016 08:50 PM

Somebody here has done exactly what you are asking for…. gimme a minute and I’ll find it.
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(insert the “waiting music theme” from Jeopardy here while I search the archives…
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OK, I cant seem to find the exact one I’m remembering, but these 2 guys have done a similar “in-line” cart setup that you could make to fit thru your doorways.
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http://lumberjocks.com/projects/223994
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http://lumberjocks.com/topics/32589

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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sepeck

314 posts in 1602 days


#6 posted 03-18-2016 08:50 PM

You can do the same thing on a platform. That’s my goal only smaller DC.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKcy1lNb-iU&list=LLNJdEfs2KLhc6pNiM8Vk08w&index=10

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#7 posted 03-19-2016 06:57 PM

Does anyone know if there would be any benefit in adding a thien baffle or something like the Jet baffle?

I don’t exactly have the tools to whip up a proper thien baffle, but a wok, or similar, lid I could easily add in place.

But would it just be more detrimental in a 2 stage system with a cyclone, or would it still keep dust out of the pleated filter?

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

816 posts in 380 days


#8 posted 03-20-2016 09:44 PM

Killavolt,

I would think that a 3 stage system made by adding a thein baffle or a Jet style baffle would offer some benefit. However, that benefit comes at the cost of design, time and material, space, and increased static pressure/reduced air flow.

I have the Oneida Dust Deputy on my shop vac. It seems to do a very good job of separating dust and keeping the filter clean. I have to believe the Super Dust Deputy is superior to my smaller Dust Deputy. Therefore I doubt there would be much benefit to adding a third stage. My approach would be to keep the dust collector a 2 stage unit and forgo the additional separator.

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#9 posted 04-29-2016 12:55 AM

I’ve been working at this the last couple of days, and this is where I’m at so far.
I had to turn the housing around on the motor because the motor mount was facing the wrong direction, so now I’m stuck at how I should mount the filter assembly.

I was going to just use 90 degree elbows then it would’ve fit over the platform better, but I found some perfectly fitting 4” ABS fittings in a 60 degree elbow so I went with those to reduce airflow restriction and still allow me to move this through a doorway.

So, any creative ideas to securely mount that filter assembly without drilling extra holes in it?

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JBrow

816 posts in 380 days


#10 posted 04-29-2016 02:18 AM

Killavolt,

The unit Looks good, nice clean build.

One method to keep the filter in place would be to build a 2×2 rectangular frame with a piece of ½” thick plywood screwed to the frame. This shelf on which the filter sets could be attached to the two vertical filter supporting posts. A pair of diagonal braces running from the outside edge of the shelf to the base would function to support the cantilevered shelf. These diagonal braces could even be attached to the vertical support posts for some added structure. Two pieces of ½” plywood attached to the diagonal braces, one at the top and the other at the bottom ends of the braces would help control racking. If eye hooks are screwed into the filter support shelf, one on each side of the filter, then a properly sized bungee cord stretched over the filter and held at each end by the pair of eye hooks would keep the filter from tipping off the shelf. Running two bungee cords at right angles to one another would be added insurance.

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#11 posted 04-29-2016 02:41 AM

I like that idea, but there’s a bag on the bottom of that filter, so I can’t just set that ring on a shelf. I have to support it and let the bag hang down on to a shelf to support any weight.

It looks good in the pic, but it’s not perfect lol. The boards are pretty cheap and so not completely straight, and my floors are a little warped, so it’s been a challenge getting things lined up.

I have to say though, the Kreg Rip Cut has been a worthwhile investment for straight cuts.

View Rentvent's profile

Rentvent

148 posts in 309 days


#12 posted 04-29-2016 03:11 AM

Invert the filter assembly. If the cyclone leaves stuff that gets passed onto the filter, it has failed.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

816 posts in 380 days


#13 posted 04-29-2016 03:43 AM

Killavolt,

I looked for the bag but did not see one. Now I think I understand the problem.

Since you have a cyclone separator, very little dust should make it to the bag. If willing to forego the bag, the shelf could still be used. A 6 sided cleanout box of some height could be built on which the filter sets. The cleanout box sets on the shelf. A large hole cut into the top of the box would allow dust to settle into the box. If the box were equipped with a polycarbonate window, it would be easy to check if the box is getting full. If you add a cleanout port, the dust could be removed from the cleanout box with a shop vac.

One way to determine the height of the box is to suck up a bunch of dust with the bag connected to collect any dust. The amount of dust observed could guide the height of the cleanout box. Felt weather stripping seems to work well as a seal between the cleanout box and the filter. Some downward pressure, perhaps from bungee cords, could be enough to perfect the seal.

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#14 posted 04-29-2016 11:39 AM

That’s a pretty good idea, I think I’ll toy with it a bit, but I’ve been trying to avoid buying more stuff. Although that gets me thinking about possibly using some kind of cylinder in place of the bag.
The reason you don’t see the bag is because I have it shoved up inside so I could rest the unit on that little 2×2 to take the picture which is also hidden due to camera trickery lol.

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Killavolt

15 posts in 277 days


#15 posted 05-05-2016 09:19 PM

A few more finishing touches like a platform under the bag, and it’ll be ready to use.

However I’m pretty disappointed by this stand and now want to build a better one because it seems like it was haphazardly thrown together and because my floors are terribly uneven the stand suffered a bit too as it isn’t exactly as square as I’d like.

I’d really love some input on how to better build this stand.

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