LumberJocks

Table base for granite slab

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Tom posted 03-01-2016 09:22 PM 678 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Tom's profile

Tom

130 posts in 523 days


03-01-2016 09:22 PM

We did a kitchen remodel back in 2008 and there was a leftover 3’x4’ piece of granite that I had the installer finish the edges.

It’s been sitting in my garage since then and it’s time to use it.

I want to make a picnic table type frame and I’m not sure whether the ‘X” frame or ‘A’ frame would be better. The slab is fairly heavy and it’ll need some good support. Any opinions on which is better? The X frame seem simpler…but the A frame appears that it may be a bit sturdier in the long run.


13 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#1 posted 03-01-2016 09:40 PM

I have a 3×5ft piece for a dining room table top. I made the base and did a Trestle design base. I know it was not hat you asked but thought I would mention it as an option.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View Tom's profile

Tom

130 posts in 523 days


#2 posted 03-01-2016 09:45 PM

When I said A frame I meant trestle…couldn’t remember what to call it. I was leaning toward that and using 2×6 lumber for the legs and some 2×4 for bracing.

View splatman's profile

splatman

558 posts in 862 days


#3 posted 03-02-2016 04:32 AM

With a 3’x4’ granite top, I would use something beefier than 2×6s for the legs. 3×6 (if you happen upon such lumber. Or cut a 6×6 in ½) or 4×4s for the legs. 2×4s would work fine for bracing.

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2545 days


#4 posted 03-02-2016 03:06 PM

You are going to want to use a trestle type design. The X will want to spread apart and will need a lot of extra support to prevent it. I would look at a design that has a fairly wide center section for the upright in the ends to help prevent any tipping when the top is leaned on.

-- Chris K

View Hammerthumb's profile (online now)

Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1438 days


#5 posted 03-02-2016 09:13 PM

That might be a little top heavy as the stone will weigh somewhere around 12-13lbs per sqft of 3/4 granite. Make sure that the base will not only support the weight, but has a wide enough stance that it won’t tip. 150lbs of stone on someone’s leg would not be a good idea.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#6 posted 03-02-2016 09:35 PM

Mine is 3×5 ft and 1 1/8 or 1 1/4 think, 2 men and a big boy to just lift the top off.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View Hammerthumb's profile (online now)

Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1438 days


#7 posted 03-02-2016 11:13 PM

1-1/4” is also called 3cm. Now that is over 16lbs per sqft. Would be quite a heavy top. Typically 3cm material is used for mechanically hung stone on building exteriors. Also used as standard countertop material in commercial projects on the east coast. It is rare to see 3cm specification for countertops on the west coast, but it happens sometimes.

“2 men and a big boy” – you betcha!

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View Tom's profile

Tom

130 posts in 523 days


#8 posted 03-02-2016 11:17 PM

The granite is the 2cm (3/4”) thickness and I can pick up the slab and move it without help. I figure a 2×6 trestle frame for the legs with some 2×4 or 4×4 bracing and a piece of plywood on the top to mount the slab will be best. I do plan on making the legs wide enough to keep it stable; it would be pretty bad to make the table and have someone knock it over at the first party.

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#9 posted 03-02-2016 11:33 PM



1-1/4” is also called 3cm. Now that is over 16lbs per sqft. Would be quite a heavy top. Typically 3cm material is used for mechanically hung stone on building exteriors. Also used as standard countertop material in commercial projects on the east coast. It is rare to see 3cm specification for countertops on the west coast, but it happens sometimes.

“2 men and a big boy” – you betcha!

- Hammerthumb


I live in WI and it was a remnant from a slab for counter tops here, that is the thickness they use in the Midwest.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View splatman's profile

splatman

558 posts in 862 days


#10 posted 03-03-2016 08:51 PM

I live in Western Wa a.k.a. The Pacific NW, and 3cm granite for countertops is Purdy much standard issue here.
2cm granite is the much-lesser-specified thickness. I know. I get scraps of C-top material 2 or 3 times a week, and seldom get 2cm stuff. About 55% granite, 45% engineered stone. Landscaping, flooring, whatever I come up with. Free stuff is good stuff. Only cost to me so far is going there and getting it. I usually do it when I go shopping or some other reason to be in town.

Already used this stuff as the floor of a shed I built 2 years ago:
The notch is to accommodate a root of that tree on the right.

View Hammerthumb's profile (online now)

Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1438 days


#11 posted 03-08-2016 09:47 PM

Venetian Hotel & Casino – 2cm material.

2cm is more typical to Las Vegas unless it is exterior cladding.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View JustplaneJeff's profile

JustplaneJeff

212 posts in 1366 days


#12 posted 03-09-2016 01:31 AM

built this base to hold a 3×4 quartz top

-- JustplaneJeff

View Tom's profile

Tom

130 posts in 523 days


#13 posted 03-09-2016 02:31 AM

That’s a nice base. My table is going to be outside so I’ll be using either redwood or pressure treated wood and paint it. I’m leaning more toward redwood because it looks nice.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com