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Forum topic by WarEagle8 posted 02-29-2016 02:01 AM 1080 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WarEagle8

4 posts in 277 days


02-29-2016 02:01 AM

Topic tags/keywords: new shop and equipment

Hello, I am new to the forum and am finally able to build and equip my dream shop. I am retired from the Army and my second job has kept me traveling. My wife told me not to wait any longer. I will be receiving some quotes to build a two car garage to house my shop on the first floor and a living space above. My idea is to buy my equipment now and build the space to fit it all. My current set up is in my attached garage with a delta cabinet table saw, delta scroll saw, delta chop saw, rigid planer and rigid spindle sander. On Friday I am going to buy the Powermatic drill press, and Laguna bandsaw (1412). Next month the Grizzley 8 inch jointer and 3 hp shaper. Does this look reasonable? Also, any ideas when building the garage such as, vacuum, electrical, water etc? I do not want to waste money but want to buy quality that will last my lifetime. My goal is to build furniture indoor and outdoor. Thank you for your help!!

Kev


25 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

753 posts in 1454 days


#1 posted 02-29-2016 02:27 AM

Some pro shops have dust collection buried in the floor. That would be slick, but you’ve got to know pretty darn close to exactly where you want all your tools to live.

Same for power if it is allowed in your area codes. Put the plug in the floor right where you want the tool. No cord problems. Ceiling mounted can also be nice, but doesn’t work great for the table saw.

Lots of lighting so you can see well at every tool.

Don’t forget some space for a nice wood rack to store your materials.

If you are going to have a living space above, you’ll have water so a shop sink is a no brain-er. But keep the hot water heater and furnace out of the shop so you don’t have to worry about dust getting hot on them or plugging filters.

If you can find a corner to wall off, use it for a finishing space. Put a fan in the wall to vent it outside and keep the smell down. It’ll fill the whole shop and rise upstairs to the living space too, unless ventilated well.

Someday, I hope to be living your same dream.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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AZWoody

693 posts in 683 days


#2 posted 02-29-2016 02:33 AM

Figure what your square footage is you think you’ll need and then double it, haha.

Seriously though, overbuild. I have a 20×40 shop and I have run out of room.

Also, get the largest dust collector you can afford and have a separate enclosure for it as they are loud. Very loud.

For electrical, make sure you have 240v outlets. The jointer more than likely will need it as well as the shaper. I would make sure you have 240v along every wall in case you get new machinery or decide to move things around.

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

25 posts in 293 days


#3 posted 02-29-2016 02:40 AM

Hey Kev, from one Army puke to another, THANK YOU and congratulations on the new shop. Your plan sounds reasonable to me. How big is the shop going to be? What are your plans for dust collection? When I built my shop I put in a 100 amp service which with your current tools and planned tools should be plenty. But there is nothing wrong in going bigger. I also ran plumbing, (but it is just roughed in right now). With tools I try to “buy once cry once” but the budget doesn’t always agree. Good luck on you build and keep us updated on your progress.

Bob

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Woodchuck2010

501 posts in 317 days


#4 posted 02-29-2016 02:51 AM

Sounds amazing! So is it going to ever be a garage, or are you making it strictly a shop?

-- Chuck, Michigan,

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WarEagle8

4 posts in 277 days


#5 posted 02-29-2016 03:12 AM

Chuck, my homeowners association says it must look like a garage from the outside but it will only be my shop.
Bob thank you for the advice. My shop will be an oversized two car garage so probably 28×25. I like the idea from AZwoody to section off the dust collection system to reduce noise. AZwoody and Brian suggested a 240 V on each wall and a plugs in the floor. I like that idea and will plan on that. I thought of a separate staining room but it will be small but doable. Thanks guys for your advice. Once I have the plans I will post and keep you updated on the progress with pictures.

Kevin

View JBrow's profile (online now)

JBrow

811 posts in 379 days


#6 posted 02-29-2016 05:18 AM

WarEagle8,

Thank you for your service. Congrats on the new from-scratch shop!

The tools you listed omitted an important tool. A powerful cyclone centralized dust collector will be an expensive but valuable accessory. Planer, jointer and shaper shavings build up pretty fast and a cyclone dust collector with fine filtration will go a long way in keeping the shop clean and you enjoying retirement longer than you worked to earn it.

I would suggest installing a 100 amp sub panel in the garage. This gives you the ability to conveniently run electric in the shop down the road, should you need it. LED lighting with color in the sun light range is real nice, especially for us older guys. About 5000 K is what I have.

When specing out the garage, consider all the heavy stuff that could be mounted to walls such as cabinets, etc. Blocking installed during framing with a map as to its location for after the walls are covered in wall board would be nice to have.

I heat my shop with electric infrared radiant lamps. They are quiet and operating and unit costs are affordable. The lamps are controlled by a thermostat and an on/off switch. Maintenance requires occasionally blowing out dust that can collect around the lamps. The advantage is that they move no air and put no moisture into the shop. However, from scratch in-floor radiant hydronic heat would be very nice.

A scale drawing of the shop and scale cut outs representing each piece of equipment would allow you to arrange the shop in different ways until you decide on the final layout. One area of space allocation often overlooked is an assembly area. If you build a large piece of furniture, you may want to assemble it and then fit drawers or whatever. If an assembly area is not allocated, the project can get in the way, making it difficult to use the machinery.

View Redoak49's profile (online now)

Redoak49

1933 posts in 1448 days


#7 posted 02-29-2016 12:11 PM

You can never have enough electrical outlets and lights.

I think flexibility is important as you will probably change things around. I would love to have higher ceilings in my shop to make running runs for dust collection.

Two other items…..air compressor also in an enclosed area for noise…..plan for storage of lumber and sheet goods.

View RossCapolupo's profile

RossCapolupo

10 posts in 332 days


#8 posted 02-29-2016 08:05 PM

Kev, congrats on building your shop. May I ask why you’re buying a Powermatic drill press? Obviously a terrific brand but seems like overkill for furniture building. Believe it or not, I get by with a Ryobi bench top… Putting that savings into a more important tool, the A3-31 Jointer Planer!

View Brian's profile

Brian

177 posts in 1491 days


#9 posted 02-29-2016 08:14 PM

I have a detached 2 car garage as my shop, and I am in the process of framing in half of the front and putting an actual door with window and just having 1 overhead garage door. It may sound silly, but it’s really annoying to not be able to walk out of the front of my shop whenever I want. Plus, I like being able to see who is driving up to it. Even with my insulated garage door, it still leaks air. I’m hoping a single bay door will reduce that since my shop has central heat and air.

-- “Always take a banana to a party, bananas are good!” - Tenth Doctor

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

393 posts in 678 days


#10 posted 02-29-2016 08:33 PM

welcome,kev.
only thing i’ll suggest is if possible have 9’ walls in the shop.
oh…..
plan a bathroom.

anda build thread.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1394 days


#11 posted 02-29-2016 11:53 PM

I could really go on for a while on this topic, but I’ll keep it short and sweet with my #1 tip from my favorite shop I ever had.

Install garage doors at both ends of the shop. It’ll cost a little extra, but nothing, and I mean nothing clears dust out of a room like instantly opening 2 of the 4 walls. It creates a great flow through the space and clears the air way faster than any dust collector ever could. This was the setup I had in my first real shop and I loved it. When things got dusty, I just opened both doors and pulled out the leaf blower.

May not be practical in your situation, but that is the one tip I have that doesn’t typically get mentioned by others.

Have Fun!

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View WarEagle8's profile

WarEagle8

4 posts in 277 days


#12 posted 03-01-2016 12:14 AM

You guys are great! You have helped me so much. Jbrow I will look into the cyclone dust collector and will ensure the collector is enclosed along with my air compressor recommended by Redoak49. Tomsteve my ceilings will e 9ft. Brian great tip and when I meet with the contractor I will run the ne door idea by him. It will also give me more wall space. I will mount my outlets above 4ft and talk about putting a smaller garage door on the back side of the shop. LED lights and radiant heating. I live n South Carolina so cooling will b more of an issue.
Ross, I know the powermatic is overkill but I really want a full drill press. After comparing it to the Jet I think it will last longer and I never will regret going big.

Thanks everyone,
Kevin

View mercwear's profile

mercwear

30 posts in 682 days


#13 posted 03-01-2016 07:36 PM

I came to this forum to ask the same question.. We are in the process of buying a new home that does not have a garage so I will be building my shop.

Here is what I was planning on doing:
  • In floor dust collection (4” PVC)
  • 220 on each wall (in addition to 120)
  • In floor outlets for my larger tools
  • Using the Grizzly workshop planner for some basic layout ideas (http://grizzly.com/workshopplanner)
  • I will probably rough up some plans in sketchup before hiring someone to make plans for the contractor

I am still on the fence with what floor to use. Since it’s a workshop and not a garage I am thinking of doing a raised plywood floor that will allow me to access the dust collection and power run below it but I am unsure if local building codes will allow for this.

This is an awesome thread, I hope people keep posting ideas.

View WarEagle8's profile

WarEagle8

4 posts in 277 days


#14 posted 03-01-2016 07:51 PM

Mercwear, I like the idea of an in floor dust collection system but how will you clear any clogs? If mounted on the walls or ceilings I can identify remove or replace the pipe if necessary. This will be fun to work together on ideas our fellow woodworkers have given us. I meet Thursday with the first contractor to discuss the plan and price!

Kevin

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 683 days


#15 posted 03-01-2016 08:07 PM



I came to this forum to ask the same question.. We are in the process of buying a new home that does not have a garage so I will be building my shop.

Here is what I was planning on doing:
  • In floor dust collection (4” PVC)
  • 220 on each wall (in addition to 120)
  • In floor outlets for my larger tools
  • Using the Grizzly workshop planner for some basic layout ideas (http://grizzly.com/workshopplanner)
  • I will probably rough up some plans in sketchup before hiring someone to make plans for the contractor

I am still on the fence with what floor to use. Since it s a workshop and not a garage I am thinking of doing a raised plywood floor that will allow me to access the dust collection and power run below it but I am unsure if local building codes will allow for this.

This is an awesome thread, I hope people keep posting ideas.

- mercwear

If you’re wanting to do it right, you want 6” rather than 4” on the dust collection.

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