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Treating maple burl?

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Forum topic by LoganN posted 02-27-2016 09:16 PM 565 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LoganN

330 posts in 1367 days


02-27-2016 09:16 PM

I went into my local lumber store and they showed me some great maple burl slabs they had just gotten. They knew i would life them, due to my love of Spalted maple. I talked to someone who bought from me in the past and they want me to make a matching coffee table and entry table with the burls. I’ve never worked with them though, Simon looking for suggestions on how to treat them and bring out the grain.
Any thoughts?


7 replies so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

2010 posts in 1733 days


#1 posted 02-27-2016 09:45 PM

I am going to watch/learn as we have a few nice silver maple cross section that we are slowly making tables from.

I took them from chainsaw rough to silky smooth with a hand belt sander then many more sandings with random and just orbital sanders.

I will eventually finish with a bar epoxy I think.

So please advise me t the same time

Thanks to all.

-- just rjR

View Andy's profile

Andy

208 posts in 294 days


#2 posted 05-24-2016 01:29 PM

I may be a little late but I just made a box on my lathe and I cut, dried and stabilized the burl myself. If the burl is soft and you cant machine it very well you can get a solution that soaks in the wood and hardens. This makes things alot easier and after stabilizing you can pretty much treat the burl as normal wood. I wound up stabilizing mine with polyurethane this is the link to my project. Something there may be helpful. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/247690

-- Andy Smith https://www.etsy.com/shop/xrayhardwoods

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1114 posts in 2411 days


#3 posted 05-24-2016 03:43 PM

I used to make a lot of things from burls and stumps. All I ever did was thin the heck out of the cheapest poly I could get, then apply it, over the course of a day or two, until it wouldn’t soak up any more.

I started with a 30% mix and would go through a gallon in short order. After a gallon or two, and the table wasn’t taking it in fast anymore, even in spots, I wiped off the excess and laid on my first top coat, thinned about ten percent.

One stump treated this way sat in front of the customer’s fire place for forty years and still hasn’t gained or lost moisture.

_
I poured a coat of Flexto two part epoxy on top. The actual working surface was a piece of 1/4” tempered glass, which rested on used car valves that had PVC pipe around them, so were undetectable.

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LoganN

330 posts in 1367 days


#4 posted 05-25-2016 12:05 PM

So, if you saw my posts of the finished projects yesterday you already know how this turned out! lol – I did a lot of work on this from epoxy and sanding to differing blends of polyurethane to really build this burl up. It turned out great and I’m really excited about it

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1114 posts in 2411 days


#5 posted 05-25-2016 02:51 PM

Didn’t see your post, but went searching in response to the mention of it. The project turned out beautifully, right down to the legs.

P.S. You should be excited about it.


So, if you saw my posts of the finished projects yesterday you already know how this turned out! lol – I did a lot of work on this from epoxy and sanding to differing blends of polyurethane to really build this burl up. It turned out great and I m really excited about it

- LoganN


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Planeman40

805 posts in 2227 days


#6 posted 05-25-2016 02:54 PM

”how to treat them and bring out the grain”

To bring out the grain on a Maple burl, use a dye before varnishing. Any liquid woodworking dye will do. Personally I prefer a yellow dye, but any color of dye will do. What happens is the dye will deeply penetrate the end grain on the face of the burl but will not penetrate the non-end grain very much, thus accenting the appearance of the burl making it “pop” as is often said. Apply whatever clear finish you prefer over the dye. I suggest trying this over a piece of burl scrap to see what happens.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View LoganN's profile

LoganN

330 posts in 1367 days


#7 posted 05-25-2016 09:39 PM

Planeman, where were you 3 months ago!! Lol – I used Danish oil and it had the same effect

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