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Need Help - 2 fold issue on Bandsaw

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Forum topic by Rayne posted 02-27-2016 08:47 PM 646 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rayne

470 posts in 1002 days


02-27-2016 08:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question bandsaw

Hello fellow LJ’s. I need some advice/help on what I can do to fix 2 issues I found with my bandsaw as I was reorganizing my shop. I would appreciate whatever you guys can come up with. I have a Porter Cable 14” Bandsaw with a 9” riser block.

1) Need to shim the riser block. I found out last night that when I raised the guide bar all the way up, it deflects the blade, which would cause me to re-adjust everything, yet it wouldn’t solve the deflection problem entirely. I decided to take a look further and noticed that there is indeed an angle on the upper wheel housing. Any ideas what material I can buy/make/find that would suffice as a shim? I was thinking tin can but it’s so malleable that I think it would just flatten until I layered it enough but not sure how stable it would be considering it would only be locked down by force of the single bolt holding it together.

2) Age old problem. I wanted to originally put a 4” port on my door for dust collection, but with the way the door is made, it won’t be that easy to install. Would a 2.5” port suffice if I used both the 2.5” port and the built-in port? 2.5” port will fit in those corners on the door. What do you think? Have you had good experience with the 2.5” port on the door?


12 replies so far

View TMGStudioFurniture's profile

TMGStudioFurniture

55 posts in 282 days


#1 posted 02-28-2016 01:51 AM

I don’t quite understand your conclusion that the riser block is out of square, and even if it is slightly I don’t know that would make much difference. You might remove the riser block and measure it to see if it is indeed out of square.

I’d check a few things:

1. If you remove the riser block, and run the saw in the standard configuration, do you still have the same problem?

2. It could be that the holder for the blade guide rod is out of true (i.e. the clamp isn’t perfectly vertical), or that the guide rod itself is bent.

3. Is the blade square to the table in both directions?

I’d also look at how much the blade is deflected from the ‘full down’ position to the ‘full up’ position. I think some small deflection is probably acceptable. You might also try the stock blade guide and see if that makes any difference.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TMGStudioFurniture

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Rayne

470 posts in 1002 days


#2 posted 02-28-2016 03:22 AM

Thanks for the reply.

1) In the standard configuration, I don’t recall ever having that problem, but since it was much lower, it may not have moved much to begin with. Not sure how to test. I do know the blade is at 90 degrees to the table when the guide is lower and it most definitely is not when the guide is up at the top.

2) Guide rod is straight and true, so it’s not that. The holder being out of true…that could be a possibility. I’ll check that later on.

3) Yes, the blade is square when the guide is lowered. It’s not when it starts going up; enough that the thrust bearing can no longer make contact with the blade.

Yeah, it’s not a small deflection when the blade no longer is in alignment with the thrust bearing, so something is up from the riser block area. Even if the wheel housing was never true, shimming the riser and shifting the wheel housing appropriately should solve the problem. I just need examples of what type of shim I could use that would take that kind of pressure, especially after I torque down on the bolt.

I appreciate the feedback and thought-provoking questions.

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 392 days


#3 posted 02-28-2016 03:40 AM



Thanks for the reply.

1) In the standard configuration, I don t recall ever having that problem, but since it was much lower, it may not have moved much to begin with. Not sure how to test. I do know the blade is at 90 degrees to the table when the guide is lower and it most definitely is not when the guide is up at the top.

2) Guide rod is straight and true, so it s not that. The holder being out of true…that could be a possibility. I ll check that later on.

3) Yes, the blade is square when the guide is lowered. It s not when it starts going up; enough that the thrust bearing can no longer make contact with the blade.

Yeah, it s not a small deflection when the blade no longer is in alignment with the thrust bearing, so something is up from the riser block area. Even if the wheel housing was never true, shimming the riser and shifting the wheel housing appropriately should solve the problem. I just need examples of what type of shim I could use that would take that kind of pressure, especially after I torque down on the bolt.

I appreciate the feedback and thought-provoking questions.

- Rayne

Pices of soda can walls will work, tin can should work fine too! Even thin plastic will work. The bolt that holds the bandsaw together is not nearly strong enough to compress any of those materials.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

295 posts in 696 days


#4 posted 02-28-2016 03:41 AM

I’ve used tin foil as shim material. It is very easy to get the exact shape and thickness you need. I’ve never had an issue with it squeezing out over time.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 981 days


#5 posted 02-28-2016 04:19 AM

Have you released the blade tension to check for deflection? The frame of the saw may be deflecting under the tension of the blade.

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joey502

487 posts in 981 days


#6 posted 02-28-2016 04:22 AM

A cheap set of feeler gauges (HF are a couple dollars) can be used to shim machines. A set or two of the feeler gauges gives you a wide range of thickness.

View xmastree's profile

xmastree

43 posts in 443 days


#7 posted 02-28-2016 04:57 AM



A cheap set of feeler gauges (HF are a couple dollars) can be used to shim machines. A set or two of the feeler gauges gives you a wide range of thickness.

- joey502

Took the words right out of my mouth.

-- Every tree is a Chistmas tree with its gifts hidden inside.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

470 posts in 1002 days


#8 posted 02-29-2016 02:43 AM

Thanks for the feedback and suggestions. I was at HF today but completely forgot to buy the feeler gauges. I do have a soda can, but since I have the ability to drive past it from work (coming home) tomorrow, I might as well do that. I also need to pick up the wrenches to deal with the bolts. I’m not going to deal with them like I did last time; too much headache with what I have and Home Depot has some great prices on the larger size wrenches, so if it’ll make my headache go away, it’s worth it. I’ll update on the progress.

As for the dust collection, I think I found a way to use a 4” port without even drilling into the bandsaw. I’ll have to sketch it on paper to see what’s plausible.

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Rayne

470 posts in 1002 days


#9 posted 03-02-2016 05:12 AM

I finally finished tuning / repairing my bandsaw. I think it’s all good now (I hope). The wheels are now coplanar as much as possible and the guide is near perfect from top to bottom. It’s good enough that it won’t affect my cuts, that’s for sure. I did buy the feeler gauge from HF and did end up using one to shim the upper wheel assembly, but not in the direction I had imagined. I had to shim it from the front as I later discovered a front-to-back alignment problem; the shim solved that. As for the side-to-side alignment, I just turned the riser block around and that seemed to solve that problem. I also heard some knocking from the bottom wheel, so I took it off and cleaned it up; put it back in and it works find now. Hopefully when I switch to larger blades that this won’t be an issue any longer. One can hope, but for now, I’m exhausted. Thanks for all the suggestions. Next stop is the dust collection and I have an idea I’ll try to put into reality this week.

Riser Block turned around; looks horrid but it works

Blade in guide is relatively straight; far better than what I recalled before.

Perfect 90 degrees top to bottom; no deflection in the blade anymore.

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 392 days


#10 posted 03-02-2016 12:26 PM

Haha thats pretty funny! Good luck, keep us updated on your efforts!

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2187 posts in 1488 days


#11 posted 03-03-2016 03:23 AM

2.5” dust collection may be okay, as a bandsaw doesn’t produce as much sawdust or as quickly as TS and other tools.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Rayne

470 posts in 1002 days


#12 posted 03-09-2016 04:10 AM

I think I solved my Bandsaw Dust problem. Here’s what I came up with. Very little dust inside and out. The dust you see inside is all MDF I couldn’t clean out with my vacuum. Amazing results compared to what it was before.

After the cuts

Very clean below

Clean inside

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