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Help with a 3 way Joinery for a stool leg

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Forum topic by ruco posted 02-27-2016 03:18 PM 651 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ruco

22 posts in 285 days


02-27-2016 03:18 PM

Hi to all,

I need help with a 3 way joint for a stool leg

,
Does anybody have an idea how to do this joint?
I will like it to have the joint concealed,
Thanks!
Mario


23 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#1 posted 02-27-2016 08:38 PM

They use lose mortise and tenon for 3 way 45 miter joints. I don’t know why lose M&T would work of this.

Search “domino 3 way 45 joint”

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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jerryminer

528 posts in 906 days


#2 posted 02-27-2016 08:50 PM

Here’s one possibility:

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#3 posted 02-27-2016 09:04 PM


Here s one possibility:

- jerryminer


I like it!

There is one piece of importation information the OP didn’t provide. How thick is the stock going to be for the leg material?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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ruco

22 posts in 285 days


#4 posted 02-27-2016 09:57 PM

Thanks Jeryyminer for the solution!,
I know that there must be several ways to do this, but I like your solution!

Thank you AlaskaGuy as well, the stock i will be using for the stool legs is a 1 1/2” stock.
Regards.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#5 posted 02-28-2016 01:58 AM

Mortise and tenon but strength will come from the shoulders. Sorry Jerry, I like bridle joints but it’s the wrong choice here.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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jerryminer

528 posts in 906 days


#6 posted 02-28-2016 04:03 AM


Mortise and tenon but strength will come from the shoulders. Sorry Jerry, I like bridle joints but it s the wrong choice here.

- Rick M.

I thought of M&T first, too, but couldn’t reconcile getting the tenons to avoid each other. How would you do that?

...and why “wrong choice”? Not enough glue surface? too small shoulders? ...?

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ruco

22 posts in 285 days


#7 posted 02-28-2016 02:19 PM

lets suppose I use the bridle joint that Jerry propose, i see no problem making the tenons, but how do you make the mortise in the vertical piece, since this piece has a diamond shape end?

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#8 posted 02-28-2016 02:28 PM



lets suppose I use the bridle joint that Jerry propose, i see no problem making the tenons, but how do you make the mortise in the vertical piece?

- ruco

Table saw, Do it before you cut the angles.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#9 posted 02-28-2016 06:00 PM

<blockquote>

I thought of M&T first, too, but couldn t reconcile getting the tenons to avoid each other. How would you do that?

...and why “wrong choice”? Not enough glue surface? too small shoulders? ...?

- jerryminer
</blockquote>

Mitered, same as in a table apron.

If there is any tension or compression, because of the angles, the only strength in that bridle joint will come from the glue. A M&T will have shoulders to resist those forces.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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jerryminer

528 posts in 906 days


#10 posted 02-29-2016 12:13 AM


Mitered, same as in a table apron.

- Rick M.

So you’re thinking something like this would be stronger?:

I suggested the bridle joint because of the increased glue area. The M&T joint above looks quite weak to me. Note that the bridle joint also has shoulders.

ruco—- to your question about making the “female” portion of the joint: Yes, it is an interior cut and would be quite challenging. A mortise could help, with some jigging, but mostly it looks like a hand-work exercise to me.

Overall, I don’t really know why you want to join three pieces like this. I don’t think there is a great, robust way to do it in wood, but if you MUST, then the bridle joint I show in post #2 is a possible solution.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#11 posted 02-29-2016 02:11 AM

Jerryminer’s tenons (post #2) don’t conflict because they’re offset so that they lap in the joint. Still, I wouldn’t use this design for a stool that I would sit on. Okay maybe for a purely decorative stool. Keep your cat on it so no one would think to sit there. Would work best with a very inert cat.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#12 posted 02-29-2016 02:25 AM

I don’t know what the design looks like but I would trust that bridal joint.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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ruco

22 posts in 285 days


#13 posted 02-29-2016 03:12 AM

This is the stool design, and yes, it´s for sitting, haha!
Thank you all for your help, I really hope to have a proper solution for this joint.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#14 posted 02-29-2016 03:51 AM



So you re thinking something like this would be stronger?:


- jerryminer

Actually I didn’t realize your bridle joints overlapped because the first time I read this was on my phone and the pictures were too small. Overlapping bridles will be stronger but could be fussy to make. My gut feeling is that even overlapping bridles will not stand up by themselves without glue or pegs. I think they will scissor apart with moderate compression. Whereas the M&T joint would stand up by itself. Actually I wouldn’t build that stool or use that joint at all, but if I had to make the choice, I think M&T would be better. On the other hand, with glues being as strong as they are; either joint glued will be adequate.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#15 posted 02-29-2016 06:17 AM

I wouldn’t trust it without a stretcher across the bottom. Be interesting to see how much weight that joint will stand up to and support. Probably less than old fats guys generate ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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