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Forum topic by NotaJock posted 02-25-2016 01:08 AM 652 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NotaJock

38 posts in 565 days


02-25-2016 01:08 AM

I’m starting to get a handle on making EGCBs but find smoothing the faces using my 1/4 sheet orbital sander to be tedious to say the least and totally unsatisfactory on my early attempts with variations in the faces of nearly 1/16”. Lacking a planer I’ve seen where others on LJ have made a sled to use their router to substitute and I’m curious whether such a setup will work on endgrain or suffer from too much tearout. If it does work what cutter is recommended?
Thanks,
NotAJock

-- Mike in SoCal


12 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

5032 posts in 3359 days


#1 posted 02-25-2016 01:32 AM

Im not a fan of cutting boards and prefer the complexities of turning a sequenced bowl, for at least then, some still work and might win an award ….... i just don’t get the cutting board thing

the only cutting board i have that still works

was made a 100 years ago and the science is still in business today : )

I recently came across the same sh:)

I pinned the wood and made a sled my router fit in

and carved it flat

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Moron

5032 posts in 3359 days


#2 posted 02-25-2016 02:00 AM

doing it for you

pointless

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View NotaJock's profile

NotaJock

38 posts in 565 days


#3 posted 02-25-2016 05:09 PM

Perhaps I’m a moron but find there is much of your post I don’t understand.
While I’m glad you get pleasure from turning bowls that’s far from my level of expertice yet and I’m at the stage where I’m looking for utility not awards.
What does ‘pinned the wood’ mean?
You failed to mention whether the cutting board you flattened was endgrain and it does make a difference I believe.
What is it you think you’re doing for me?

TIA

-- Mike in SoCal

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

296 posts in 700 days


#4 posted 02-25-2016 05:21 PM

Yes, the router jig will work well. It would also be recommended over a planer because the knives can compress the fiber ends together an jam or rip apart big chunks of the board, depending on how beefy your planer is.

The best bit for the job would be a “surface planing” or “bottom cleaning” bit. Make sure your jig doesn’t have any warp or twist. If it isn’t perfectly in plane, you will transfer the error directly to your work piece.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

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tomsteve

394 posts in 685 days


#5 posted 02-25-2016 05:32 PM


Im not a fan of cutting boards and prefer the complexities of turning a sequenced bowl, for at least then, some still work and might win an award ….... i just don t get the cutting board thing

- Moron

no complexities in this cutting board. prolly wouldnt win any awards either:
https://youtu.be/gliOZyHkdps

although sequenced bowls are nice, theres folk that dont get standing in front of a lathe for extended periods of time,too.

the bit style jon mentions works great for me.

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2548 days


#6 posted 02-25-2016 05:34 PM

Take a look at this sled.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/226450

It can be scaled to fit your needs. You can also add sacrificial boards to the outer edges to prevent tear out. Just cut them of after you flatten them.

For the record I prefer EGCB’s to bowl turning.

-- Chris K

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NotaJock

38 posts in 565 days


#7 posted 02-27-2016 01:40 AM

Jon,Tom, Chris, Thanks for the feedback.
This Dish Carving Router Bit (
http://www.rockler.com/1-dish-carving-router-bit-1-2-shank )
looks like it might do the trick, I think.

-- Mike in SoCal

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

215 posts in 928 days


#8 posted 02-27-2016 05:46 PM

Here are a couple of photos of the router sled I use. Works really well, and I made this originally to flatten a board that was to wide for my 13” planer. I took a class a couple years ago on router techniques. Picked up alot of tips and tricks. The instructor had a sled just like it. I remove the plastic plate from the router base and mount the base directly to the sled. This works really well to keep your router flat. You can see where I used some scrap wood to shim the cutting board. You want it to stay put. I also cut a couple wedges. You can’t tell from the photo, but the scraps are not making a tight fit. I still need to cut a couple wedges.


I’m sure the dish carving bit would work. But I started out with a 3/4 dado router bit.
I now have a 1-1/4” bit. The bigger the bit the faster the job goes. Bigger bits get expensive.
You said you don’t have a planer, so you may find yourself using a sled more often. I rarely use my sled so the 1-1/4” bit gets it done for me. You may want to look bigger.
And remember, find the hi spot on the work piece and make lite cuts.
Good luck.

-- John

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bigJohninvegas

215 posts in 928 days


#9 posted 02-27-2016 07:08 PM

Here are a couple of photos of the router sled I use. Works really well, and I made this originally to flatten a board that was to wide for my 13” planer. I took a class a couple years ago on router techniques. Picked up alot of tips and tricks. The instructor had a sled just like it. I remove the plastic plate from the router base and mount the base directly to the sled. This works really well to keep your router flat. Yoh can see where I used some scrap wood 5o shim the cutting board. You want it to stay put. I also cut a couple wedges. You can’t tell from the photo, but the scraps are not making a tight fit. I still need to cut a couple wedges.

-- John

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 685 days


#10 posted 02-27-2016 11:18 PM

that is a dam nice sled there, john!

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NotaJock

38 posts in 565 days


#11 posted 02-28-2016 03:26 AM

I quite agree and much simpler than what I was going to build.
I’ll borrow your design if you don’t mind.
I promise to return it when I’m done. ;-)
Thanks for the help.

-- Mike in SoCal

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bigJohninvegas

215 posts in 928 days


#12 posted 03-28-2016 04:31 PM

Hi Mike. Not sure if you had made your own router sled yet. The cutting board I posted on my sled warped a little when I glued it up, and was in need of flattening. I was finally able to get to it yesterday, and thought I would post a couple of photos of how I actually hold things in place while using the sled. The cutting board had a litlle wobble to it. So I hold it down flat and put a small wedge under it to keep it from rocking. Then tape that wedge so the I does not move. At the same time I use some scrap wood and wedges to secure the board to the sled. I take a very light cut. And you can see the 1st pass the corner did not get touched at all. When that side is done, I set it on my table saw to check to see that it is flat. If its good, flip it and do the other side.
Good luck,

-- John

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