LumberJocks

Crosscutting Hardwoods

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Olaf Gradin posted 2443 days ago 1218 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Olaf Gradin's profile

Olaf Gradin

69 posts in 2444 days


2443 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: freud d1280x diablo crosscut ash miter

I’m burning…er…crosscutting some 8/4 White Ash (6” wide) tonight and having some poor results at it. The pieces I’m cutting right now are from the base of the tree; there’s a huge difference in difficulty depending on whether or not I’m cutting at the base, or on the opposite end of the board – 6’ up the tree. I create a lot of smoke at the base. I’m cutting this with a 12” compound miter saw with an 80 tooth Freud (D1280X) blade. The blade has served me well for the 45° degree cuts I use when doing picture framing, but it’s having a tough time with the Ash. Is this normal, or should I be using a different tooth than this ATB variety? Do fewer teeth have less of a tendency to smoke?

-- It takes a viking to raze a village. &mdash Blog'r: http://www.gradin.com


11 replies so far

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1763 posts in 2595 days


#1 posted 2443 days ago

Sounds like you’re into wet, sappy wood near the base. An 80 tooth blade is great for “finishing” cuts…maybe you’ll want to try a 30-40 tooth blade and see what happens. Something a little more agressive ya know? Another one would be using a blade made for cutting pressure treated wood. That stuff is normally wet with chemicals but my blades didn’t seem to care.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8727 posts in 2704 days


#2 posted 2442 days ago

I use a 40 tooth ATB blade by CMT called “The General”. Using a 40 tooth blade may seen counter-intuitive, but this blade is exceptional in the cut that it provides. I use as few teeth as possible to get the job done. More teeth means more friction and more burning especially in hard wood like ash.

You would think that only 40 teeth would provide a rough cut. With blades from Lowes and Home Depot they do. The CMT General cuts like a laser, it is amazing. If you look at any of my projects I can tell you that all the cuts were done with “The General” and I prefer the thicker kerf too.

If a particularly thick piece of wood seems to burn I cut really close to the finish line, like 1/16”, which is 1/2 blade thickness, and then do the final cut.

I am not a salesman for CMT but they very quickly have become my favorite blades and bits.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2567 days


#3 posted 2442 days ago

Sounds to me like your blade is dull. I use DeWalt 12” chop saw blades in my Dewalt 12” saw. I just came in from cutting a bunch of 45’s in old fir that was actually 3.25×5 inches. No problem with a blade that isn’t brand new. I also trimmed some 5.25 square Fir by makeing 4 cuts with this saw. No smoking. Check your arbor and see if it is bent or out of line.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View cronk's profile

cronk

33 posts in 2727 days


#4 posted 2442 days ago

I agree with Thomas – dull blade more than likely. it pays to stay sharp.

-- cronk, oregon

View Karson's profile

Karson

34862 posts in 3006 days


#5 posted 2442 days ago

I agree with the Dull Blade – Unless – the wood is under pressure and is binding on the blade (closing at the cut line)

Try to just cut off 1/8” if it smokes it’s dull. if it cuts fine then it is probably a bind on the blade.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Olaf Gradin's profile

Olaf Gradin

69 posts in 2444 days


#6 posted 2442 days ago

So I guess it’s dull – or creating too much friction with the extra teeth. I cleaned the blade really well last night to see if that was my problem – it wasn’t. I bought a cheap IRWIN 12” 40 tooth general blade. It cuts like a charm, though certainly rougher than my 80 tooth. The kerf is thinner and I noticed that while the blade cuts quickly, it can choke up on feed rate if thrown into the cut too quickly. It’ll probably dull within the amount of lumber I have to cut, but at $30, I think it will serve my purposes nicely. Meanwhile, I’m interested in getting the Freud sharpened up. It has 80 teeth – any recommendations on making that less tedious?

-- It takes a viking to raze a village. &mdash Blog'r: http://www.gradin.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34862 posts in 3006 days


#7 posted 2442 days ago

Check for local sharpeners. Sometimes Woodcraft might collect blades for people and the sharpener picks them up there.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2567 days


#8 posted 2442 days ago

Believe me, you are not getting too much friction with the 80 tooth blade. My DeWalts are at least 60-80. What brand is this saw?

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Olaf Gradin's profile

Olaf Gradin

69 posts in 2444 days


#9 posted 2441 days ago

It’s a DeWalt 12” compound miter. Probably 4 years old now and in very good shape.

Related question – do you recommend flipping your board to get a crosscut when it’s too deep for the saw? I have some 10’ by 1½’ 8/4 ash that needs crosscutting. It’s unwieldy for the table saw too, but I thought if I cut it to length first, it would be easier.

-- It takes a viking to raze a village. &mdash Blog'r: http://www.gradin.com

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1763 posts in 2595 days


#10 posted 2441 days ago

Yes, you can flip the board. You’ll also find out if your saw is cutting a true 90 degrees. The two cuts won’t line up.

Wood magazine just did a saw blade test and review in their Dec 07 issue. Lots of good info there.

A word of caution: If you’re finding that the Irwin blade is “chokeing up on feed rate if thrown into the cut too quickly” then you’re rushing the machine. People seem to think a “chop saw” is a motorized hatchet (my son is the king of this) and that you can chop thru a cut. Look at your table plate…You’ll see that it’s butchered because at fast rates the blade actually warps just a little. This is especially true of the thinner kerf blades. That plate should have one kerf cut in it. Anything outside of that kerf means the blade was forced and warped. It will also throw your cut angle off making you believe that the saw is out of alignment. Remember, you own a “compound miter saw”. It’s a precision machine that makes precise cuts. Take your time.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Olaf Gradin's profile

Olaf Gradin

69 posts in 2444 days


#11 posted 2440 days ago

I hear you. I don’t “chop,” per se. The blade I have on there is a forward-swept variety and is probably more appropriate for ripping, though it’s referred to as a “general” use blade. Anyway, it’s quite aggressive and pulls itself through the stock. On the hard stuff, I have to actually limit how hard the blade is being pulled into the material.

-- It takes a viking to raze a village. &mdash Blog'r: http://www.gradin.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase