LumberJocks

My first cutting board.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by invertMASA posted 02-24-2016 03:34 AM 793 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View invertMASA's profile

invertMASA

9 posts in 290 days


02-24-2016 03:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting board

I am new to all of woodworking. Just going to say that first. But I am going to be making my mother a cutting board, and really just looking for any tips or tricks, and the do’s and don’ts. Any info would be great. I will be using some combination of Bubinga, White Hard Maple, Purple Heart, and Black Walnut. I do have a table saw and I just bought my first planer and this will be the first time I have ever used one. So any tips with that would also be great!

Thanks guys.

-- Looking for some pallet ideas? Check out this site http://thispallet.com/


16 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#1 posted 02-24-2016 04:45 AM

Hi,
I am assuming you are going to make strips, glue them together and cut the board to dimensions. The only advice is to run a board through your planer and see if there are snips at the ends. If there are, use a sacrificial bard the same thickness as your cutting board when you run it through the planer. Sand you board with 100 or 150 so it can absorb plenty of whatever you seal it with. Use Tidebond III waterproof glue. Use some wax paper when doing the glue up and apply enough pressure over the boards so you have a fairly even surface. Don’t clamp too hard; as soon as you see the glue oozing out, give it another 1/4 to 1/2 turn. Don’t clamp too loose either. Dry fit everything and mark them so you know the sequence.
Good luck

-- earthartandfoods.com

View chevybowtieguy's profile

chevybowtieguy

27 posts in 1066 days


#2 posted 02-28-2016 08:18 AM

Don’t put your cutting board through the planer once you have turned it to expose the end grain. It might be a quick end to you shiny new planer.

-- - chevybowtieguy

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#3 posted 02-28-2016 09:16 AM

It would help to know if you’re making an end grain or laminated board?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View invertMASA's profile

invertMASA

9 posts in 290 days


#4 posted 02-28-2016 03:13 PM

Thank you for all the advice! Sorry that is kind of a key piece of information I left out, It will be an end grain cutting board. O glad you said that chevybowtieguy, I would of ran it through the planer after I got it all glued up again. Now what if I do several glue ups and cuts, Whats the best way to ensure I get a flat top? Just sand it?

-- Looking for some pallet ideas? Check out this site http://thispallet.com/

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 385 days


#5 posted 02-28-2016 05:06 PM

invertMASA,

I checked the web for toxicity of bubinga and purple heart, but found nothing that relates to food-safe issues. However, you may want to do a little more research regarding food safety of these woods just to be sure. Tropical woods tend to have chemicals that impart some rot and insect resistance. That can make the fine dust from milling a problem, usually when entering the body by the lungs and skin. Therefore, it would be prudent to check out the tropical woods you will use to determine what precautions you may want to take. Wearing a NIOSH 95 dust and gloves (when you can – except when table sawing) would be prudent safety precautions. Also dust collection when cutting or sanding would be good if you have it, even if it is a shop vac.

Tropical woods offer their own unique challenges. Some include oils that can spoil a glue-up. Therefore before applying glue, wipe the jointed edges of the tropical woods with clean acetone or mineral spirits and once the solvent has flashed off, immediately proceed to glue-up. Do not let the solvent treated edges set for a prolonged period of time or oil can work its way back to the surface. Titebond III is a good water resistant glue. However, a cutting board could be immersed in water (no matter what you tell your Mom), so you may want to consider a waterproof glue compatible with the woods you are using. Resorcinol glue, also known as resorcinol-formaldehyde or an epoxy resin glue would be alternatives to a water resistant glue.

The other issue to consider is whether gluing woods with such differing densities together invites failure of the cutting board at some future time. Moisture entering the end grain will cause the wood fibers to swell and the differing species will expand by different amounts, possibly leading to cracks or warping. Generally I would think the less dense the wood, the more swelling and movement. In this case, if I am correct, walnut would be the biggest problem. However, since the pieces of wood making up the cutting board will be small and no edge banding to constrain movement is mentioned, this may not be a problem for your project. But wood movement is something to consider.

When the project is ready to the finish, pick a finish that is food safe. Mineral oil and walnut oil work, but have to be frequently re-applied.

With the equipment you have, the only way I can think of to flatten the end grain surfaces of the cutting board is by sanding (keep it out of the planer!). A belt sander is faster than a random orbital sander. Since you are new to woodworking, I suggest using 120 grit paper on the belt sander. Any courser grit may be too hard to control. Great care is required with the belt sander. A slight tilt will leave a gouge. Staying in one spot too long will leave a deep divot. Switch to a random orbital sander when the panel is flat. If you do not have a belt sander, a random orbital sander will work, but takes longer – but keep it riding flat on the surface. Start with 80 grit paper and if after getting an idea of how well it is going, perhaps switch to a 60 grit paper.

Drawing lines spaced close together across the entire surface to be sanded with a lead (graphite) pencil is helpful. Then as you sand, the high spots and low spots will be revealed. The pencil marks left on the surface indicate low spots. This is especially helpful when flattening the cutting board.

Work your way up through the grits (60, 80, 100, 120, 150, 180, 220) when you get to finish sanding – I like to go to at least 220 grit for end grain and on oil finished projects, but you may decide to stop at a finer grit. Use raking light from a flash light before moving to the next grit. This will reveal any scratches that have not been removed.

Good luck!

View ShapingGrain's profile

ShapingGrain

14 posts in 280 days


#6 posted 03-04-2016 02:18 AM

When you are ready to finish you can cover in mineral oil. You can get 16 oz for $1.98 at walmart and it is foodsafe. Coat enough on an endgrain board so it draws it through to the other side. Leave it over night and coat again. If you want to be adventurous you can make a paste by adding in beeswax to make “spoon oil”. I would add simple rubber feet with stainless screws so no one leaves it on a puddle of water on the counter and makes it pop. It also keeps is from sliding around and easier to pick up. Go slow, be safe.

-- Ken, New Hampshire, www.shapinggrain.com

View invertMASA's profile

invertMASA

9 posts in 290 days


#7 posted 03-04-2016 02:33 AM

Thank you all again! Taking in all this advice! Going to start on it this weekend I think. So I will let you guys know how its going!

-- Looking for some pallet ideas? Check out this site http://thispallet.com/

View ShapingGrain's profile

ShapingGrain

14 posts in 280 days


#8 posted 03-10-2016 04:36 AM

Did you make progress? Let me know if you have questions.

-- Ken, New Hampshire, www.shapinggrain.com

View invertMASA's profile

invertMASA

9 posts in 290 days


#9 posted 03-10-2016 02:03 PM

Things are going great so far! Made a crosscut sled to true up my edges from after the first glue up. (Using portable table saw, does not have a huge work area) But did not have It quite square to my blade. So that caused some things not to be square. But still does not look bad unless you really look at it. Going to start the oil up process tonight. Will post a picture here soon.

-- Looking for some pallet ideas? Check out this site http://thispallet.com/

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2547 days


#10 posted 03-10-2016 02:26 PM

I would also recommend some way of pulling the dust out of the air. A dust mask will help minimize what yuu breath, but it will get into your eyes as well. Sanding is a tough way to flatten, it works but is slow. If you can make a router sled I think it is worth the time and effort.

Check Youtube for videos of how other people cut up and glue up the various bits and pieces.

-- Chris K

View invertMASA's profile

invertMASA

9 posts in 290 days


#11 posted 03-10-2016 11:41 PM

O that would be much faster then sanding! Yeah, sanding this one took FOREVER! I have another one being glued up right now. Might have to build a jig before I finish it. Save a few hours haha.

So here are some pics! Not too bad for my first one I dont think. Was not fully prepared when I was doing the glue up. So things are not perfectly lined up. Learned my lesson on that one. This second one is looking much better! Also did not pay any attention to the knots in the wood. So they are kinda an eyesore. Filled them with some glue so no food would get stuck down in it. And third, Due to my crosscut sled not being square, The pattern is not square. But other than all that, Not to bad. hahaha. Looks alot better in real life.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/o3ukgcv.jpg!

Whats the best tool to spread the glue? I bought a ” Wood glue brush/bottle” from menards. Kinda works but more or less just pushes the glue around and not leaving much behind.

-- Looking for some pallet ideas? Check out this site http://thispallet.com/

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 493 days


#12 posted 03-11-2016 12:38 AM

Board looks awesome for a first go at it!

I normally just run my glue in a zig-zag pattern and let the pressure applied while clamping spread it out. As long as you get some squeezeout at all joints, you’re good to go.

View BMichs75's profile

BMichs75

39 posts in 1123 days


#13 posted 03-11-2016 12:42 AM

All of those wood species are food safe and beautiful when finished. One warning…. DO NOT RUN AN ENDGRAIN CUTTING BOARD THROGH A PLANER!!!!! If you haven’t watch it yet, go to The Wood Whisperer.com and watch his cutting board video. That’s how I got started in woodworking . As for spreading glue, use your finger or an old playing card for full even coverage. This is one area you do not want to skimp

-- Brandon

View invertMASA's profile

invertMASA

9 posts in 290 days


#14 posted 03-11-2016 12:47 AM

Thank you McFly, Yeah I have been told a few times not to do that lol. Scared enough to never try it. And ooo a playing card. Thats a good idea.

-- Looking for some pallet ideas? Check out this site http://thispallet.com/

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 493 days


#15 posted 03-12-2016 03:21 AM

We’ve always dropped straight lines down the center and make sure to pour out enough so that we see squeeze out on all sides when we clamp it into the rotisserie. Fails are fairly rare.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com