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Drum Sander Construction Motor Power Question

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Forum topic by jmhockey23 posted 02-24-2016 03:33 AM 434 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jmhockey23

3 posts in 284 days


02-24-2016 03:33 AM

Hello,

Hopefully I’m posting in the right section and someone can help me with this. I’m building a drum sander that will be used primarily for carving canoe paddles. I was originally planning on making the drum 6” in diameter with 3/4” MDF board circles glued together to create a 18” wide drum. After cutting a circle I decided I wanted a larger drum…10” diameter. Then after cutting the circles I realized that the weight of the drum was adding up quickly and I questioned the strength of my motor. The motor I purchased is a Grizzly 1/3 hp 1725 RPM, 110v/5.3a, TEFC. I have a keyed 3/4” steel shaft that it will spin, what I was hoping was a 10” diameter 18” wide drum of MDF. I’m wondering do I need to upgrade the motor? Or would making the drum smaller say 15” or 13” wide or going back down to 6 or 8” diameter be better. The weight of 12 3/4” of the discs was about 26 lbs or about 2lbs per 3/4” thick 10” diameter MDF board. Any opinion would be appreciated before I keep building.

Thanks!


7 replies so far

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Ub1chris

85 posts in 841 days


#1 posted 02-24-2016 04:19 AM

I’ve never built a drum sander but have been reading about it as its on my “list” I think your motor will have problems. Most plans I’ve seen have a motor at least 3/4 HP. Also I’m not sure why you would want the drum diameter to be so large. Make it smaller but keep the length long.

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jmhockey23

3 posts in 284 days


#2 posted 02-24-2016 11:54 AM

Thanks for the response. For carving a canoe paddle the larger drum is better for the larger contact area. Not making something this big but this gives you the idea.

http://bangordailynews.com/2012/01/04/business/orono-company-offers-new-line-of-handcrafted-paddles-for-l-l-beans-centennial/

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tomsteve

393 posts in 680 days


#3 posted 02-24-2016 01:15 PM

working on a 23” wide drum sander myself even though only 5” dia drum, everything ive read suggests at least 1 1/2 hp motor.

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#4 posted 02-24-2016 01:29 PM

Are your discs solid or did you drill some holes in them to eliminate some mass? I think your motor will be underpowered, too.

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2543 days


#5 posted 02-24-2016 01:38 PM

The added diameter means you need extra torque from the motor, it will be too much for the 1/3HP motor. You will only be able to take very light cuts. The high inertia will help keep the speed up for a little bit. Most commercial drum sanders run at around 2200 feet per minute. A 10” drum will run at 4400 feet per minute. Pretty fast. You might be able to build a speed reducer to turn the drum at 800 RPM. It will just about double the torque, you loose some in the transmission.

A 1 HP motor will be a better choice.

-- Chris K

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jmhockey23

3 posts in 284 days


#6 posted 02-24-2016 02:03 PM

Thanks for the feedback. I haven’t cut holes in the discs to reduce weight, although I have considered it. I think I will upgrade the motor.

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lew

11336 posts in 3216 days


#7 posted 02-24-2016 02:52 PM

The one I built http://lumberjocks.com/lew/blog/27660 uses an old furnace blower motor- probably 1/4 to 1/3 hp- the drum is 3” PVC reinforced with wooden inserts. I can stall the drum if I try to take too much material off at a time.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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