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Tilting and Sliding Router Table

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Forum topic by Jack Colliflower posted 02-22-2016 06:39 PM 1868 views 1 time favorited 56 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jack Colliflower

39 posts in 1593 days


02-22-2016 06:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router slider router table tilting

Hello, Fellow Woodworkers.
My name is Jack Colliflower, and I make products for wood workers (namely zero-clearance plates for table and miter saws).
I have a new product which I’d like some feedback about. I’m going to attach some pics and a video link.
It’s not for sale now, but I’d like to put it on the market soon.
Mainly, I have my experience and the opinion of some great wood workers. But I’d like some more opinions. I am a machinist first and wood worker second (I’m looking forward to the time it will be the other way around :)
It’s a router table/plate that is installed similarly to a router plate which is put in a table top.
It can be used traditionally (like any router table), but it has a fence which functions as a sliding table; it can tilt zero to ninety and lock into position; and in that position, it can slide back and forth. It can accomplish angles that, otherwise, would be quite difficult.
Attached are pics. Please ask if there are any questions.
Patent-pending.
Jack Colliflower
PS: There was some sort of problem with loading the pics, so here is the video link and I’ll work on the photos: www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnWlmNviM0s

-- J Colliflower


56 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#1 posted 02-22-2016 07:41 PM

Is this spam Jack?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 376 days


#2 posted 02-22-2016 07:51 PM

That’s very cool !
You definitely can save on chamfer router bits as essentially with your table any straight bit becomes chamfer bit. However you need to consider if the extra expense for the table worth the saving.
Other than that what other benefit do I get from the table ?
I would not consider the sliding action to be of much use as it is very small and is superseded by the table fence.

-- It's nice!

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2591 days


#3 posted 02-22-2016 08:01 PM

I see a lot of potential safety issues with that thing.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 376 days


#4 posted 02-22-2016 08:14 PM



I see a lot of potential safety issues with that thing.

- Ger21


Sounds like “No, because I said so!”

-- It's nice!

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

39 posts in 1593 days


#5 posted 02-22-2016 10:18 PM



Is this spam Jack?

- AlaskaGuy

This is not spam. Just wanting some feedback.

-- J Colliflower

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

39 posts in 1593 days


#6 posted 02-22-2016 10:25 PM



That s very cool !
You definitely can save on chamfer router bits as essentially with your table any straight bit becomes chamfer bit. However you need to consider if the extra expense for the table worth the saving.
Other than that what other benefit do I get from the table ?
I would not consider the sliding action to be of much use as it is very small and is superseded by the table fence.

- 716

Thanks! Yes, the cost of chamfer bits can be saved.
The fact that the fence acts like a sliding table is huge, as most sliding action seems to be for the short ends which will fit in the table.
All the angles which can be accomplished is a big bonus too. Currently we are limited to bit angles and jigs (which can take a bit of time to make) in order to get all sorts of weird angles. With this tool, you can get any angle between zero and ninety in a flash. That opens up a lot of doors for more varied wood working.
Tongue and groove applications are made easy in the 90 position.
The slide action functions similarly to the sliding table and is great for joints. One benefit of using it this way is that the fence functions as a featherboard.
Thanks for the opinion.

-- J Colliflower

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

39 posts in 1593 days


#7 posted 02-22-2016 10:26 PM



I see a lot of potential safety issues with that thing.

- Ger21

I think there are many potential safety issues with most tools, and much depends on understanding how the tool works.

-- J Colliflower

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

39 posts in 1593 days


#8 posted 02-22-2016 10:36 PM

Trying again for pics….

Here are a couple of cuts which would be really tough to make on a “regular” router table.
(I’m not saying these cuts are particularly useful—just showing some capabilities.)
Jack

-- J Colliflower

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 376 days


#9 posted 02-22-2016 10:47 PM

Thanks! Yes, the cost of chamfer bits can be saved.
The fact that the fence acts like a sliding table is huge, as most sliding action seems to be for the short ends which will fit in the table.
All the angles which can be accomplished is a big bonus too. Currently we are limited to bit angles and jigs (which can take a bit of time to make) in order to get all sorts of weird angles. With this tool, you can get any angle between zero and ninety in a flash. That opens up a lot of doors for more varied wood working.
Tongue and groove applications are made easy in the 90 position.
The slide action functions similarly to the sliding table and is great for joints. One benefit of using it this way is that the fence functions as a featherboard.
Thanks for the opinion.

- Jack Colliflower

I am still not convinced about the sliding action, but you do have a good point about the angles. In fact I can imagine a very deep like 2” sliding dovetail with random angle ( as long as you can leave with or take care of a non flat bottom) made entirely with a straight bit. I might be wrong but I do not think as of now there is such option with precanned router bits.
So the invention definitely has a user. Call Rockler, they are after such things :-)

-- It's nice!

View Jack Colliflower's profile

Jack Colliflower

39 posts in 1593 days


#10 posted 02-23-2016 03:21 AM

Thanks for your opinion. I have contacted some of the “biggies” to see if they’re interested. We’ll see….

Thanks! Yes, the cost of chamfer bits can be saved.
The fact that the fence acts like a sliding table is huge, as most sliding action seems to be for the short ends which will fit in the table.
All the angles which can be accomplished is a big bonus too. Currently we are limited to bit angles and jigs (which can take a bit of time to make) in order to get all sorts of weird angles. With this tool, you can get any angle between zero and ninety in a flash. That opens up a lot of doors for more varied wood working.
Tongue and groove applications are made easy in the 90 position.
The slide action functions similarly to the sliding table and is great for joints. One benefit of using it this way is that the fence functions as a featherboard.
Thanks for the opinion.

- Jack Colliflower

I am still not convinced about the sliding action, but you do have a good point about the angles. In fact I can imagine a very deep like 2” sliding dovetail with random angle ( as long as you can leave with or take care of a non flat bottom) made entirely with a straight bit. I might be wrong but I do not think as of now there is such option with precanned router bits.
So the invention definitely has a user. Call Rockler, they are after such things :-)

- 716


-- J Colliflower

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2591 days


#11 posted 02-23-2016 03:29 AM


I think there are many potential safety issues with most tools, and much depends on understanding how the tool works.

- Jack Colliflower

The safety issues were with the way you were using it. I don’t think any major tool company would bring something to market that was used in the way you showed that being used.
It wouldn’t take two days of that being on e market before someone had their fingers or hands in the router bit.
Just my opinion.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 376 days


#12 posted 02-23-2016 06:57 AM


I think there are many potential safety issues with most tools, and much depends on understanding how the tool works.

- Jack Colliflower

The safety issues were with the way you were using it. I don t think any major tool company would bring something to market that was used in the way you showed that being used.
It wouldn t take two days of that being on e market before someone had their fingers or hands in the router bit.
Just my opinion.

- Ger21


The table in the video is not more dangerous than any of the existing router tables ( I do feel jealousy in your posts Ger21, and hence “No ! It is bad!”)

-- It's nice!

View ErikF's profile

ErikF

508 posts in 1704 days


#13 posted 02-23-2016 09:56 AM

I think there are many potential safety issues with most tools, and much depends on understanding how the tool works.

- Jack Colliflower

The safety issues were with the way you were using it. I don t think any major tool company would bring something to market that was used in the way you showed that being used.
It wouldn t take two days of that being on e market before someone had their fingers or hands in the router bit.
Just my opinion.

- Ger21

That’s it…

I used to be on this site a lot and asked a lot of questions- I now avoid it for the most part because it seems to be trolled by butt-plugs, know-it-all’s, and safety police. The whole concept and build of this thing is awesome, for whatever reason it stirred your inner douche and demanded a safety flag.

I’m about to head to my shop- there are a few tools without guards, no salt on the frozen driveway, and I might drive through a yellow light. I hope none of these things offend you.

-- Power to the people.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#14 posted 02-23-2016 12:52 PM

Pretty slick. Not sure of the practicality/need but then again I’m not a huge router user.

Mattias Wandel has a tilting router lift he uses to make unique moldings.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1181 days


#15 posted 02-23-2016 01:03 PM

That’s a neat concept. What are you using for bearings in the slides? Is there a way to incorporate toggle clamps into the router plate (perhaps from the bottom) to keep from needing an allen key to lock it down?

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