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Help needed! What kind of nuts on this saw!

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Forum topic by Sprot posted 02-22-2016 09:01 AM 1034 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sprot

9 posts in 643 days


02-22-2016 09:01 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question saw handsaw restoration

Hi

I got this oldish looking dovetail saw from local auction site. It looks a bit rough – definitely not a high end saw but it has a comfortable handle and a nice size that I don’t yet have.

The problem is that it has a bit loose handle and I want to try my hand on restoring this into usable condition. Fix the crack in handle. Clean and sharpen plate etc. But I stumbled upon a problem. I can not figure out what kind of nuts it is using. From far it seemed like splitnut but it doesn’t have splits into them. Could it be that it is riveted over brass washers?

Here is some closer pictures:

Hope that you can help me to figure this out!


11 replies so far

View James Wright's profile

James Wright

233 posts in 328 days


#1 posted 02-22-2016 01:45 PM

They look like ground down rivets. that was done on cheaper saws. sorry to say. I have never tried to restore them but I would have to drill them out and put in a good pair.

-- James Wright, Rockford IL, https://www.youtube.com/c/WoodWright

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

3315 posts in 1151 days


#2 posted 02-22-2016 01:58 PM

Interesting little saw. Is there a name stamped on the spine?

The old saw makers who used split nuts would file the screw heads and nuts flush with the handle after installing them. They didn’t give much thought to ever having to take the handles off. Occasionally, the filing would be enough that it would remove the grooves in the nuts. I’ve had 2 or 3 saws like this.

What I’ve done is take a small graving instrument (like a small narrow chisel) and cut enough of a groove in the nut that I could get it off. You might also try a small cutoff wheel in a dremel. Another technique that I’ve had mixed results with is, after cleaning the nut well, epoxy a hex head nut onto it. Once you get the nut off, heat will loosen the epoxy.

You may damage the nuts getting them off, but replacements are available from a few sources. I don’t think they are rivets. If you can get enough of a groove in the nuts to grasp them with a split nut driver, they will come off.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#3 posted 02-22-2016 01:59 PM

If the handle isn’t loose I would just fill the crack with epoxy and clean the saw up as best you can and leave the handle alone.

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Sprot

9 posts in 643 days


#4 posted 02-22-2016 03:32 PM



Interesting little saw. Is there a name stamped on the spine?

The old saw makers who used split nuts would file the screw heads and nuts flush with the handle after installing them. They didn t give much thought to ever having to take the handles off. Occasionally, the filing would be enough that it would remove the grooves in the nuts. I ve had 2 or 3 saws like this.

What I ve done is take a small graving instrument (like a small narrow chisel) and cut enough of a groove in the nut that I could get it off. You might also try a small cutoff wheel in a dremel. Another technique that I ve had mixed results with is, after cleaning the nut well, epoxy a hex head nut onto it. Once you get the nut off, heat will loosen the epoxy.

You may damage the nuts getting them off, but replacements are available from a few sources. I don t think they are rivets. If you can get enough of a groove in the nuts to grasp them with a split nut driver, they will come off.

- summerfi

Thanks for reply. I will try this way to open those.

About the name: at least I don’t see any stamps currently but there is lot of rust and grime.

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Sprot

9 posts in 643 days


#5 posted 04-29-2016 07:45 AM

Hi again.

I finally got to the saw again. It seems that there were no threads. At least I couldn’t get any of them working like thread. So I drilled one side off and used an old nail to remove the pins.

The plate seems quite OK. It had a slight bend on it but I think I managed to true it up. Also there is no extreme pitting on the plate.

Here’s some pictures of starting of the restoration process.

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Sprot

9 posts in 643 days


#6 posted 04-29-2016 07:47 AM



If the handle isn t loose I would just fill the crack with epoxy and clean the saw up as best you can and leave the handle alone.

- dhazelton

The handle was loose sadly. So I had to take the handle off.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#7 posted 05-04-2016 12:15 AM

it looks like its well worth the attention.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View rtbrmb's profile

rtbrmb

468 posts in 1852 days


#8 posted 05-04-2016 09:23 PM

Thanks for logging in & posting updated pictures. I am looking forward to following this post until the saw is finished.

Bill in MI

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Sprot

9 posts in 643 days


#9 posted 05-05-2016 05:19 AM

Few updates:
The back of the saw and handle are now cleaned:
I removed all old finish from the handle as i wanted to make it smoother than it was.

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Sprot

9 posts in 643 days


#10 posted 05-13-2016 08:25 AM

Here is the finished saw :)

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#11 posted 05-13-2016 11:58 PM

Nice indeed

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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