LumberJocks

"Tung Oil Finish" Maintenance

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Tommy H. posted 02-17-2010 05:26 AM 7835 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Tommy H.'s profile

Tommy H.

16 posts in 1751 days


02-17-2010 05:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tung oil humidor finishing walnut

I am using a Tung Oil Finish for the first time. I am wondering what kind of maintenance is involved. Will I need to apply a maintenance coat, and when?

It is being used on a walnut humidor. Should I put poly over it since I will not be able to maintain the finish under my spanish cedar lining?

Thanks, Tommy H.

-- Tommy H., Georgia, Lot to learn...


13 replies so far

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1728 days


#1 posted 02-17-2010 10:19 AM

Hi Tommy:

I just replied to your question in GREAT DETAIL. Inserted the Link. Checked it out and BLEW myself off Lumber Jocks. ......LOL… SO it’s gonna be shorter this time. Lee Valley Tools is my prefferred Supplier (Canada) they have GOOD information on TUNG OIL Seems as if “Polymerized Tung Oil” is the best. They have a “Fact Sheet” and an “Instruction Sheet ” that you can Download as a PDF File. SO! I’ll try and get the LINK in here again. If not you can Google The name as above and it will take you right there. When you get there click on “Woodworking”, then “Finishes” and you should see “Tung Oil” listed there.

Say HI! from Rick, from Canada to that GOOD Lookin’ GUY who’s Holding Dad’s Ears Apart in Your Site Picture Please.

Let me know how you make out. LINK HERE

Rick

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2823 days


#2 posted 02-17-2010 01:41 PM

“Tung Oil Finish” is NOT tung oil.
It’s a diluted wiping varnish.

How you apply real tung oil is NOT the same for “Tung Oil Finish”.

-- 温故知新

View KMJohnson's profile

KMJohnson

165 posts in 1716 days


#3 posted 02-17-2010 01:42 PM

Interesting information.

-- Let's do it in the wood pile!

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1728 days


#4 posted 02-17-2010 09:56 PM

Dear Mr. Goodwood:

Did you click on the link above and read the info sheets or review the products available there? ? NONE of the Tung Oil there contains any kind of VARNISH. Paint is a ”Finish” Polyurethane is a ”Finish” Shellec is a Finish etc.etc. When you ”FINISH something with “PURE TUNG OIL” it’s been Finished with Pure Tung Oil.

Maybe it’s different in your area and no doubt somewhere, somebody sells something that is called “Tung Oil Finish” that might contain Varnish.

Yes. You can “Thin” Pure Tung Oil but you use Mineral Spirits up to 50% for the First Coat as a Sealer. If PURE Tung Oil thickens which it does just by it’s nature you can restore it’s “Original Viscosity” by adding Mineral Spirits. NOT Varnish.

Varnish is Varnish. PURE Tung Oil is Just That… PURE Tung Oil. Simple as that. Now I’m “FINISHED”.

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2823 days


#5 posted 02-17-2010 10:52 PM

Rick:

1. Your link doesn’t work for me, but I am very familiar with Tung Oil and Polymerized Tung Oil.
I am also very familiar with the products offered by Lee Valley.
I’m involved in the production of artisan wood finishing products, including small batch polymerized tung oil.
Also, I’ve been a consulting chemist to several large paint and wood finishes manufacturers.

2. The original question mentioned the use of “tung oil finish” which is a popular product in the USA that is a diluted wiping varnish, not a tung oil product, e.g. Formby’s Tung Oil Finish and others.

3. The original question mentioned finishing a humidor. I would never use and kind of drying oil, e.g. BLO, tung, etc. Nor would I use anything that contained mineral spirits or turpentine. The smell will linger inside the box for a very long time; something you don’t want in a humidor. IMNSHO, a good way to ruin a humidor is to use real oil finishes or even so-called Danish Oils (oil and varnish blends).

The only finishes of choice for outside humidors is shellac and natural waxes.
The cedar liner should, of course, be left unfinished.

Note: I was answering the original question based upon the facts given.

Google “tung oil finish” for a plethora of discussions about this strangely mislabeled product.

-- 温故知新

View bob101's profile

bob101

186 posts in 2145 days


#6 posted 02-18-2010 12:22 AM

I make humidors on a regular basis, and would not use tung oil at all it is too strong in the odor department. for a simple finish you could use a furniture wax (french polishing), but it is labour intensive(buffing),I personally put nothing on the insides under the cedar and stain the outside and then apply polyurethane for protection.

-- rob, ont,canada

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1728 days


#7 posted 02-18-2010 01:33 AM

Randy:

It’s sometime amazing to find out how much we DON”T know. You just taught me something I didn’t know and I Sincerely thank you for that. You and Rob, from ONTARIO Canada who might live down the street from me …LOL…. are Totally right on the use of Tung Oil on a Humidor!!

I must state that I have never used Tung Oil on anything but am considering it for a “Rustic” Bench in my front hall. Probably because I’m getting tired of Staining & Slapping Urethane on everything ..LOL…

I think I’ll do as you suggest and Google Tung Oil as I understand there is some concern about using it on any type of food item. I also understand from the info on Lee Valley that there is Tung Oil and there is Tung Oil depending on what type of wood and what Country it came from.

You’re right on as far as mislabeled Products!! It IS something we should all be concerned about. There are LOTS of them out there and the big question is …WHY! I think we all know a probable answer to that question.

A friend told me to Google TEFLON, I did. Apparently 98% of the American Public can thank DuPont and the US Government (No insult intended, it’s just as BAD up here.) for depositing a Not Very Friendly, Cumulative, Unremovable, Chemical in ALL of our Bodies and they’ve known about it since about the mid 50’s. That REALLY Urinates me off!!

Thank you both for your input and another Learning experience for me.

Regards: Rick

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View Beetroot's profile

Beetroot

8 posts in 1715 days


#8 posted 02-18-2010 04:19 AM

I just put a coat of Minwax Tung Oil Finish on a humidor project I am working on. After reading this thread I’m having second thoughts regarding the potential for odor. After my tung oil finish dries, could I put a coat of poly on top of it to ward off any smells?

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 2482 days


#9 posted 02-20-2010 03:45 AM

Beetroot. If you have used the minwax tung oil finish, you have basically varnished it. Adding “poly” will just add more layers of varnish and will not seal in anything, just add more fumes. Both have to fully cure by oxidation. IF the finish is on the inside, you will need to let it dry open, for at least a week, and probably more (up to a month). Higher temp (not over 120 degrees F; 50 C) will speed things up after the first 48 hours.

Best “hard” finish for interior compartments where fumes are not wanted is shellac, with lacquer being the second best.

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

View Tommy H.'s profile

Tommy H.

16 posts in 1751 days


#10 posted 02-20-2010 04:00 AM

I am in the same boat with Beetroot. Since I have already applied a couple of coats of ‘varnish’, labeled as Tung Oil Finish, I believe that I will put several coats of wipe-on poly to reduce the smell. It’s not that bad now but all the comments have me nervous.

I will let you know how it comes out.

All the comments have been helpful. Thanks, TH

-- Tommy H., Georgia, Lot to learn...

View Rick's profile

Rick

6454 posts in 1728 days


#11 posted 02-20-2010 10:37 AM

Yes he is and I can see that you would agree with that by all the great looking ”Finished Projects” you’ve posted on this site. Are they finished with “Pure Tung Oil”? OH! Hang on. I think I have you confused with someone else.

-- COMMON SENSE Is Like Deodorant. The People Who need It Most, Never Use It.

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2823 days


#12 posted 02-20-2010 02:30 PM

socalwood:

I may be the only LumberJock with a Analytical Gas Chromatograph, but no table saw.
You would be surprised what is NOT in wood finishing products sold in the USA.
Our product labeling laws are confusing, deceptive and insulting.
Arm yourself with knowledge. It’s buyer beware.

“Polyurethane” is another labeling term that doesn’t tell the real contents of a product.
Generally, the term “Polyurethane” means that some actual polyurethane resin was used in the manufacture of the product but the amount and the proportions to other ingredients is not revealed. The cheaper brands of poly are high diluted with other (cheap) resins and drying oils (cheap). This is where brand names become important. Products from Waterlox, Epiphanes, General Finishes, Zar and others are gourmet quality compared to the fast food blandness of the MinWhacks of the world.

IMNSHO, in most cases tung oil is a better ingredient than a stand alone finishing product Varnishes made by cooking together tung oil with phenolic resins makes one helluva spar varnish (long oil) and a hardwood flooring varnish (medium oil) that is museum quality. It really boils down to using good finishing products with good ingredients and good techniques.

The marriage of pure tung oil and walnut produces a hand-rubbed finish like no other. I refinish walnut gun stocks with Polymerized Tung Oil (PTO) and they are beautiful and easy to repair. I’ve got some PTO finished crotch walnut table tops, plaques, frames and art objects that are spectacular. I love crotch walnut and tung oil, esp. PTO. While tung oil looks okay on pine, its not the best finishing choice for that wood, IMNSHO.

Another factor is the design and intended use of the wood project. If I’m making a Nakashima-style coffee table out of highly figured crotch walnut, then a hand-rubbed PTO finish is in order. If I’m making a coffee table that will be exposed to grandkids and beer-swilling in-laws, then polyurethane it must be. :)

D.R. Goodwood…

-- 温故知新

View Tommy H.'s profile

Tommy H.

16 posts in 1751 days


#13 posted 02-21-2010 01:21 AM

I would never disagree with anyone who has a Gas Chamber. Once again, thanks for all the help.

Thanks, Tommy H.

-- Tommy H., Georgia, Lot to learn...

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase