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Forum topic by 716 posted 02-18-2016 09:35 PM 750 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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716

502 posts in 376 days


02-18-2016 09:35 PM

I am trying to get a new crosscut blade for my 2HP Grizzly hybrid.
As of now I am debating between Freud LU73M010 and Freud D1060X Diablo. This is mostly for crosscutting hard and soft wood plus less frequently plywood.
Which one would yo stay with ( or any better alternatives that do not break the bank ?)

-- It's nice!


32 replies so far

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

976 posts in 912 days


#1 posted 02-18-2016 10:01 PM

Freud LU83 10” 50T TK

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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716

502 posts in 376 days


#2 posted 02-18-2016 10:10 PM

Isn’t it a combination blade ?

-- It's nice!

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MadMark

976 posts in 912 days


#3 posted 02-18-2016 10:20 PM

Yep and it does an excellent job at either.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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716

502 posts in 376 days


#4 posted 02-18-2016 10:38 PM

If combination blades were as good in cross/rip cutting as specialized blades there would be no specialized blades.

-- It's nice!

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MadMark

976 posts in 912 days


#5 posted 02-18-2016 10:46 PM

The specialty blades are used in shops where you have dedicated saws for running rips and crosscuts. You can use separate rip & crosscut blades on a single saw if you don’t mind changing the blade between cuts. I guarantee that production shops do not swap blades like that. Freud’s LU83 is a great compromise that lets you switch between rip & crosscut with excellent results at both for less than a Forrest WW blade.

There are also specialty blades for plywood, laminate, etc. Each should be used when volume and quality dictate, but for daily use in a small shop combo blades are a good compromise for general work.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 977 days


#6 posted 02-18-2016 10:54 PM

The Freud fusion blades and the WW2 make both rips and crosscut very well. I use a 40T combo blade for everything except when ripping boards thicker than 1” (25.4mm).

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jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#7 posted 02-18-2016 11:07 PM

I’d disagree with that. Sorry, but it’s definitely worth having different blades and switching them out. You won’t get as smooth as a finish crosscutting on a combo, and you won’t get as smooth or as quick of a cut as a combo as you would on a dedicated rip. For the extra $50 and <30seconds>s worth the better performance. Plus, a dedicated rip can come in a flat top grind, which makes cutting joinery easier.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1906 days


#8 posted 02-18-2016 11:14 PM

I use a Freud cross cut blade with 80 teeth,can’t remember the model # but it is a Diablo and not the industrial type.it cuts clean with no cut marks.
I have heard a lot good thing about the” glue line” blade but have not tried it.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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MadMark

976 posts in 912 days


#9 posted 02-18-2016 11:22 PM

The LU83 and other blades will give you glue line cuts. People often mistake the off-the-saw surface for having been sanded. Yes, dedicated blades are better. Blade changes are not ‘30 seconds’ and think thru your last project, how many times did you switch from rip to crosscut & back? Multiply that by your actual blade change time & charge that back to the project cost. You’ll soon pay for a 2nd dedicated ripping saw.

Or how about putting a dedicated crosscut saw blade on the chop saw and just rip on the ts? You can save by not having to use a ts miter gauge!

You can see that there are lots of rips & crosscuts in this little box, each is a potential blade change without a combo blade!

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7166 posts in 2036 days


#10 posted 02-18-2016 11:25 PM

http://www.infinitytools.com/SAW-BLADES-PACKAGES/departments/1026/

Get a rip and a cross cut blade it’s worth it, or if you like get a combo blade from

Infinity they work well.

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716

502 posts in 376 days


#11 posted 02-18-2016 11:30 PM

You can see that there are lots of rips & crosscuts in this little box, each is a potential blade change without a combo blade!

M

- MadMark

If you plan properly there is one blade change to make the box you pictured.
Oh, what about those burn marks ? Aren’t they from not using a specialized blade ? ;-)

-- It's nice!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#12 posted 02-18-2016 11:41 PM

716 your instincts are correct although a combo blade might be fine for xcuts, it won’t perform like a dedicated ripping blade.

After trying one, I highly recommend the Freud industrial line (not the red ones).
I have the LM74M01C rip it is superior to their other blades IMO.

I also like the CMT line quite well. They seem to have a beefier piece of carbide.
Rip 24 T 201.024.10

I have several industrial Xcut blades but the names have worn off.
I think they are Amana.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#13 posted 02-19-2016 12:24 AM


The LU83 and other blades will give you glue line cuts. People often mistake the off-the-saw surface for having been sanded. Yes, dedicated blades are better. Blade changes are not 30 seconds and think thru your last project, how many times did you switch from rip to crosscut & back? Multiply that by your actual blade change time & charge that back to the project cost. You ll soon pay for a 2nd dedicated ripping saw.

- MadMark

No, blade changes are indeed 30 seconds or less. Pop off the zero clearance insert, undo the arbor nut, swap blades, put the nut back on, put the zero clearance insert back in. Riving knife doesn’t even need to come off. And if you plan your cuts, and in the correct logical order, then you won’t change blades that often.

Dedicated blades are vastly superior. Definitely worth the minimal expense and time it takes to switch. Rips are significantly faster, which you need to take into account if you are concerned about the time it takes to switch blades. I’d argue that you more than make up for that time spent changing blades by using a rip blade.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Dabcan's profile

Dabcan

252 posts in 2130 days


#14 posted 02-19-2016 01:08 AM

Something to keep in mind, when you get your blades sharpened, you pay by the tooth, so if you are debating between too equally rated blades, pick the one with less teeth.

-- @craftcollectif , http://www.craftcollective.ca, https://www.etsy.com/shop/craftcollective?

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#15 posted 02-19-2016 01:24 AM

A zero clearance insert will help your cut quality significantly. I have been pleasantly surprised at the crosscut quality from a 24 tooth Diablo rip blade.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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