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Do not buy made in China ?

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Forum topic by 716 posted 02-18-2016 06:25 PM 2640 views 0 times favorited 90 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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716

502 posts in 381 days


02-18-2016 06:25 PM

“Chinese junk” is probably the most used cliche phrase. Buy American ! Here what you will be looking at: A 12” aluminum triangle for $129 and that is on preorder sale ! One would think that for the price it better be made of gold or at least titanium coated high speed steel.
I worked at manufacturing for some sizable portion of my life and can tell you it is very easy to machine this kind of tools to the stated specifications, despite the claims from this manufacturer how expensive it is.
Thanks, I will stay with my plastic triangle that I bought for $1.99 10 years ago,

-- It's nice!


90 replies so far

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1213 posts in 1575 days


#1 posted 02-18-2016 06:35 PM

My plastic drafting triangles work great… ;^)

Don’t forget, those aluminum triangles are “limited run”! Get ‘em before they’re gone!

View redesigningwood's profile

redesigningwood

139 posts in 299 days


#2 posted 02-18-2016 06:35 PM

I have always been on a smaller budget and could never figure out why people spring for outrageously expensive tools for casual users – some of the china stuff is garbage, but I for one have a LOT of harbor freight hand tools and
consumables as they are usually less then half the cost of a name brand item with the same quality.

What I WILL NOT buy from HF is any air or power tool, I once had a grinder actually come apart in my hands and refuse to try again. Cheap tools are great, but not worth losing a finger.

And yes, I love my 3$ empire plastic square too, thanks home depot!

-- Mat

View WillliamMSP's profile

WillliamMSP

747 posts in 1069 days


#3 posted 02-18-2016 06:37 PM

You could also buy an Empire Level square, many (most? all?) of which are made in the US.

...but I suspect that you’re just trolling and/or looking for stuff that fits the narrative playing through your head.

-- Practice makes less sucky. (Bill, Minneapolis, MN)

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#4 posted 02-18-2016 06:54 PM

Woodpeckers is less than 4 miles from my house and I’ve wanted to check the place out for a while, the thing keeping me from making such an inquiry is the lack of value for most of their products. If it’s close to twice the quality, I can pay three times as much, not 30 times as much!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#5 posted 02-18-2016 07:37 PM

Its all relative, some people leave more that 129 dollars for a dinner tip at fine restaurants.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Shadowrider's profile

Shadowrider

183 posts in 674 days


#6 posted 02-18-2016 07:41 PM

I tend to agree on this item but I will say this. You just CAN’T buy some items that are made in the USA in a lot of cases.

Find a table saw that’s is 100% manufactured here to buy and see what the price is. I think that’s a lot of the problem and I’ve got 25 years of machining and manufacturing under my belt too. It’s maddening that we have farmed out out manufacturing to the extent we have.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#7 posted 02-18-2016 07:55 PM

The “seniors” on this board will remember when “made in Japan” was a bad thing (at the time it was true). Things evolve…you get better or somebody else will eat your lunch (Toyota and Honda come to mind).

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#8 posted 02-18-2016 07:56 PM



I tend to agree on this item but I will say this. You just CAN T buy some items that are made in the USA in a lot of cases.

Find a table saw that s is 100% manufactured here to buy and see what the price is. I think that s a lot of the problem and I ve got 25 years of machining and manufacturing under my belt too. It s maddening that we have farmed out out manufacturing to the extent we have.

- Shadowrider


We’ve done to to ourselves. So many only see price when they shop. Look at Harbor Freight, they’re gowning like wild fire. There’s only one reason for that. People have voted in China made products with how they spend their dollars.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 397 days


#9 posted 02-18-2016 08:29 PM

There is more to this triangle than machining it :

Receiving the high grade, certified aluminum sheets
Rough cutting the sheet (for both the triangle and the fence)
Milling the triangle and fence
Drill, tap, countersink
Laser etch
Send out to anodize
Silk screen or pad print white markings
Package the screws, triangle and fence.
Ship to store

To this add: Fixed costs, depreciation of Equipment and manufacturer mark-up + resale and distribution profit.

This is probably not a high volume production item, its more of a quality measuring tool for quality consious shops and canot compare to a mass produced thin plastic device.

-- PJ

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#10 posted 02-18-2016 10:03 PM

While it’s neat, it’s still a textbook example of diminishing returns. It is capable of maintaining precision beyond what wood can hold, it makes as much sense as using a micrometer on your stock after planning. It represents a good value for those interested in showing off their tools and poor value for those trying to mark a square line.

View redesigningwood's profile

redesigningwood

139 posts in 299 days


#11 posted 02-18-2016 10:42 PM

50 or 60 years ago I can imagine why being made in America was such a great thing, but as far as now, I just don’t think it matters where something is made as much as what it is made of and what quality the item is.

-- Mat

View Jeff2016's profile

Jeff2016

72 posts in 329 days


#12 posted 02-18-2016 11:37 PM



I have always been on a smaller budget and could never figure out why people spring for outrageously expensive tools for casual users -

- redesigningwood

I am on a very tight budget as well and used to think the same thing. I can tell you first hand the enjoyment of this hobby increases (for me anyway) tenfold when you know you can depend on your tools. I know when I set a tool to square it will stay that way instead of spending my time questioning and checking, or finding out too late it wasn’t truly square. I save and buy one tool at a time. It’s slow but worth it!

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#13 posted 02-18-2016 11:46 PM

716 I feel you but truthfully you need a better square for ww’ing if that framing square is all you’re using.

After doing some checking I discovered one of my Stanley framing square so far off it was ridiculous.
Got a Starrett. Dead on accurate.

I also got a Starrett 8” square that is NOT accurate.
The Empire and Johnson stuff you see at HD is totally unreliable.

Unfortunately they are expensive for some reason.

I think the iGaging line is fairly decent.
Or you can pick up some machinists squares cheap sometimes.

Or you can make your own but you have to check them periodically.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#14 posted 02-18-2016 11:53 PM

Makes me ponder the question,
What’s more valuable the square you use to draw the line, or the square line that has been drawn?
I believe when it’s all said and done, all that matters is that you have a square line.
Kudos to those that can afford nice things. Wish I had one. It would be a joy to use every time I got to use it.
Although getting by with crappy tools is just as well.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 590 days


#15 posted 02-19-2016 12:32 AM



50 or 60 years ago I can imagine why being made in America was such a great thing, but as far as now, I just don t think it matters where something is made as much as what it is made of and what quality the item is.

- redesigningwood

A lot of politics involved on the entire question and I’ll politely decline to go there. For me quality matters most. I think people have to realize that we have “progressed” to the point where we will not be able to compete on a lot of things. We won’t be the first country to experience that…it’s just how things work and always have.

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